Current Race News and Events

Current Race News and Events, Race News Articles.
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51% of Americans agree paying college athletes should be allowed
More Americans than not believe that college athletes should be allowed to be paid more than what it costs them to go to school, a new national study of nearly 4,000 people suggests. Findings from the National Sports and Society Survey (NSASS) suggest that 51 percent of adults agree that college athletes should have the ability to be paid above school costs, 41 percent disagree and 8 percent don't know. (2020-11-24)

How moving slower allows groups of bacteria to spread across surfaces
Scientists have found that bacterial groups spread more rapidly over surfaces when the individuals inside them move slowly, a discovery that may shed light on how bacteria spread within the body during infections. (2020-11-23)

Commentary: Want to understand health disparities? Get your antiracist goggles on
How do we shrink persistent racial health disparities, especially among children? Dell Medical School's Elizabeth Matsui says it starts by applying an antiracist blueprint to guide the way we fund, evaluate and disseminate research. (2020-11-19)

Racial attitudes in a community affect COVID-19 numbers
Implicit racial attitudes within a community can effectively explain racial disparities seen in rates of COVID-19 in the United States, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by George Cunningham and Lisa Wigfall of Texas A&M University, USA. (2020-11-18)

Americans' attitudes about guns influenced by owners' race and gender
A new study from researchers at Rice University found that Americans' attitudes about gun ownership are impacted by the gender and race of firearms' potential owners. (2020-11-17)

Why do so many parents avoid talking about race?
BU social psychologists share ways adults can overcome their own assumptions and discomfort to talk honestly about race with children. (2020-11-13)

Racial/ethnic minorities comprise small portion of patients referred with AL amyloidosis
Despite being theoretically at an increased risk for AL amyloidosis, underrepresented minorities make up only a small percentage of patients seen at specialized treatment centers for this disease. (2020-11-10)

Study finds patients prefer doctors who share their same race/ethnicity
Patients who shared the same racial or ethnic background as their physician were more likely to give the maximum patient rating score, according to a new analysis of 117,589 patient surveys from 2014 to 2017. (2020-11-09)

Minority patients with rheumatic diseases have worse COVID-19 outcomes
New research at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting, reveals that people of color with rheumatic disease have worse health outcomes from COVID-19 infection, are more likely to be hospitalized to treat their coronavirus infection, and are more likely to require invasive ventilator treatment. (2020-11-06)

Different outcomes by race/ethnicity among patients with COVID-19 and rheumatic disease
Among US patients with rheumatic disease and COVID-19, racial/ethnic minorities had higher risks of needing to be hospitalized and put on ventilators. The findings come from an analysis published in Arthritis & Rheumatology. (2020-11-04)

New Texas poll: Trump and Biden in close race
President Donald Trump is about even with former Vice President Joe Biden in a close contest for Texas' 38 electoral votes in a new swing state poll of Texas likely voters released today. (2020-10-29)

Fatal police shootings among black Americans remain high, unchanged since 2015
Overall, the report found 5,367 fatal police shootings in the five-year span, of which 4,653 were eligible for analysis because both race and age were identified. The researchers calculated that this represented an annual average of 31,960 years of life lost. (2020-10-27)

Rice rolls out next-gen nanocars
Rice University researchers continue to advance the science of single-molecule machines with a new lineup of nanocars, in anticipation of the next international Nanocar Race in 2022. (2020-10-26)

Racial, socioeconomic disparities in extensive-stage small cell lung cancer treatment
A new study shows that Black individuals with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer are less likely to receive chemotherapy for their disease compared to white and other racial groups. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center, the results indicate that individuals who are Black, elderly, uninsured, or have non-private health insurance and lower education levels, were less likely to be treated with chemotherapy for this type of lung cancer. (2020-10-26)

Study reveals the influence of race correction in kidney disease care
Results have implications for timely kidney disease management, referral to nephrology, and dialysis planning. (2020-10-15)

Online horse race bettors are less keen to gamble after a losing day
A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that a bettor likely stays away from betting for a 27% longer time after a losing day than after a day on which they won or broke even. The study looked at how losing or winning on the previous betting day predicts how long it takes from a bettor to return to the next session of online horse race betting. (2020-10-14)

When reproductive rights are less restrictive, babies are born healthier
American women living in states with less restrictive reproductive rights policies are less likely to give birth to low-birth weight babies, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier. The findings show that women, particularly US-born Black women, giving birth in states with less restrictive reproductive rights policies have a seven percent lower low-birth weight risk, compared to women in states with more restrictive policies. (2020-10-13)

Black police officers disciplined disproportionately for misconduct, IU research finds
An examination of racial differences in the disciplining of police officers in three of the largest U.S. cities consistently found that Black officers were more frequently disciplined for misconduct than White officers, despite an essentially equal number of allegations being leveled. This included allegations of severe misconduct. (2020-10-12)

Predicting sports performance with "big data"
Smartphones and wearable devices are not simple accessories for athletes. A CNRS researcher has developed a simple mathematical model for studying the performance of endurance athletes. A recent collaboration with a scientist from the Polar Electro Oy company (Finland) made it possible to apply the model to data gathered from approximately 14,000 runners training in real conditions. (2020-10-06)

People with Parkinson's disease have a higher risk of dying from COVID-19
A new database analysis of approximately 80,000 patients shows that people with Parkinson's disease (PD) have a 30% higher death rate from COVID-19 than people without the neurodegenerative condition. The new analysis of patient data in the TriNetX COVID-19 research network conducted by University of Iowa researchers and published in Movement Disorders suggests that Parkinson's disease is an independent risk factor for dying from COVID-19. (2020-10-01)

New NH poll: Biden leads Trump in run for president
Former Vice President Joe Biden has an eight-point lead over President Donald Trump among likely New Hampshire voters, according to a new poll released today by the UMass Lowell Center for Public Opinion. (2020-09-29)

New NC poll: Biden and Trump tied
President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden are deadlocked in the race for North Carolina's 15 electoral votes, according to a new poll released today. (2020-09-29)

Sweet success: Heavy consumption of sugary beverages declined in the US from 2003 to 2016
According to a new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, the percentage of heavy sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumers - those who drink more than 500 calories of SSBs daily - trended downwards in the United States between 2003 and 2016. (2020-09-24)

Poll: Americans' views of systemic racism divided by race
In the wake of outrage across the nation and racial justice protests spurred by the deaths and injuries of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Jacob Blake and other Black Americans, more than half of Americans believe policing in the country is not fair, according to a new national poll released today by the UMass Lowell Center for Public Opinion. (2020-09-23)

News coverage in Chicago disproportionately devalues Black and Hispanic lives
Social scientists found that homicide victims killed in Chicago's predominantly Black and Hispanic neighborhoods received less news coverage than those killed in mostly white neighborhoods. (2020-09-22)

Interim data from early US COVID-19 hotspot show mortality and seriousness of disease were not associated with race/ethnicity
A study of interim data from two hospitals in an early US COVID-19 hotspot, to be presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online 23-25 September), shows that race and ethnicity were not significantly associated with higher in-hospital COVID-19 mortality, and that rates of moderate, severe, and critical forms of COVID-19 were similar between racial and ethnic groups. (2020-09-17)

Machine learning models identify kids at risk of lead poisoning
Machine learning can help public health officials identify children most at risk of lead poisoning, enabling them to concentrate their limited resources on preventing poisonings rather than remediating homes only after a child suffers elevated blood lead levels, a new study shows. (2020-09-16)

Viruses on glaciers highlight evolutionary mechanism to overcome host defenses
An international team of scientists led by Christopher Bellas from the University of Innsbruck, Austria, studying life on the surface of glaciers in the Arctic and Alps challenge assumptions on virus evolution. Their study, now published in the journal Nature Communications shows that, contrary to expectations, the viruses on glaciers in the Alps, Greenland and Spitsbergen are remarkably stable in the environment. (2020-09-02)

Newly identified gene grants tomatoes resistance to bacterial speck disease
Bacterial speck disease, which reduces both fruit yield and quality, has been a growing problem in tomatoes over the last five years. Because the culpable bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae, prefers a cool and wet climate, crops in places such as New York State have been particularly susceptible. Researchers at the Boyce Thompson Institute have uncovered the first known gene to impart resistance to a particular strain of the bacterium that causes speck disease. (2020-09-02)

EBMT trial shows improvements in treatment of Severe Aplastic Anaemia
The European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT), Europe's collaborative peer network of professionals working in the field of stem cell transplantation and cellular therapy, announced today the results of the phase III RACE trial during EBMTs virtual 46th Annual Meeting. Preliminary data show that adding Eltrombopag to standard immunosuppressive treatment is safe and increases response rates in patients with Severe Aplastic Anaemia (SAA). (2020-08-31)

Children notice race several years before adults want to talk about it
Adults in the United States believe children should be almost 5 years old before talking with them about race, even though some infants are aware of race and preschoolers may have already developed racist beliefs, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-08-27)

When it comes to supporting candidates, ideology trumps race and gender
Voters who express prejudice against minorities and women are still more likely to support candidates who most closely align with their ideologies, regardless of the race or sex of such candidates, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-08-24)

Dementia kills nearly three times more people than previously thought: BU study
Dementia may be an underlying cause of nearly three times more deaths in the U.S. than official records show, according to a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study. (2020-08-24)

Having a doctor who shares the same race may ease patient's angst
When doctors are the same race as their patients, it can sometimes forge a sense of comfort that helps to reduce anxiety and pain, particularly for Black patients, new research from the University of Miami suggests. (2020-08-24)

Biomedical research may miss key information by ignoring genetic ancestry
A new study of Black residents of four distinct US cities reveals variations in genetic ancestry and social status that underscore the inadequacy of using skin color as a proxy for race in research. Dede Teteh of City of Hope Medical Center in Duarte, California, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on August 19, 2020. (2020-08-19)

Increasing graduation rates of students of color with more faculty of color
A new analysis published in Public Administration found that student graduation rates improve as more faculty employed by a college or university share sex and race/ethnic identities with students. (2020-08-19)

COVID-19 hospitalizations analysis shows disparities across racial and ethnic groups
Adding to mounting evidence of COVID-19's disproportionate impact on some US communities, a new analysis of hospitalization rates from the University of Minnesota shows Black, Hispanic, American Indian and Alaskan Native populations in the United States are significantly more likely to be hospitalized due to COVID-19 than whites. (2020-08-17)

Review: Consequences of systemic racism in urban environments
Even as studies have shown that the uneven distribution of urban heat islands, urban tree canopy cover, and urban environmental hazards, for example, are strongly dictated by structural racism and classism in cities, relatively few studies have addressed the varied contributions of social factors like race to ecological heterogeneity in cities. (2020-08-13)

Research suggests bias against natural hair limits job opportunities for black women
New research suggests Black women with natural hairstyles, such as curly afros, braids or twists, are often perceived as less professional than Black women with straightened hair. (2020-08-12)

Study gauges specific site stomach cancer risks among ethnic groups
Non-white Americans, especially Asian Americans, are at disproportionately higher risk for gastric cancer compared to non-Hispanic white Americans. A new study breaks down this risk according to specific ethnicities and locations within the stomach. (2020-08-06)

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