Current Racial bias News and Events

Current Racial bias News and Events, Racial bias News Articles.
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Black, Hispanic adolescents significantly more likely to die by police intervention than whites
A recent study evaluating the use of force by police against children found that Black and Hispanic adolescents are significantly more likely to die from shootings related to police intervention compared to non-Hispanic white adolescents. The findings, led by Children's National Hospital researchers and reported online Nov. 24 in Pediatrics, mirror similar racial and ethnic disparities in adults and highlight the need for interventions and policies to mitigate these tragedies. (2020-11-24)

Historical bias overlooks genes related to COVID-19
A historical bias -- which has long dictated which human genes are studied -- is now affecting how biomedical researchers study COVID-19, causing many virus-related genes to go largely unexplored. (2020-11-24)

For African American men with prostate cancer, decision regret linked to medical mistrust
Medical mistrust is one reason why African American patients are more likely to have regrets about their choice of treatment for prostate cancer, suggests a study in The Journal of Urology¬ģ, Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-11-24)

Closing the racial disparity gap in survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest
In-hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA) represent catastrophic and often terminal events. Despite investments to improve the quality of resuscitation efforts, fewer than 25% of all patients that experience cardiac arrests in hospitals survive to discharge, and survival varies significantly across hospitals and by race. Until now, few have been able to specify reasons for the between-hospital differences. (2020-11-24)

Commentary: Want to understand health disparities? Get your antiracist goggles on
How do we shrink persistent racial health disparities, especially among children? Dell Medical School's Elizabeth Matsui says it starts by applying an antiracist blueprint to guide the way we fund, evaluate and disseminate research. (2020-11-19)

Racial attitudes in a community affect COVID-19 numbers
Implicit racial attitudes within a community can effectively explain racial disparities seen in rates of COVID-19 in the United States, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by George Cunningham and Lisa Wigfall of Texas A&M University, USA. (2020-11-18)

UTSA researcher examines drug overdose mortality in the Hispanic community
UTSA researcher Manuel Cano, assistant professor in the Department of Social Work at UTSA is shedding light to understand the topic of drug overdose deaths in the Hispanic community. In the article ''Drug Overdose Deaths Among US Hispanics: Trends (2000-2017) and Recent Patterns'' published in ''Substance Use & Misuse'' Cano used national death certificate data (data recording all deaths of U.S. residents) to examine drug overdose mortality in different Hispanic subgroups, based on heritage, place of birth and gender. (2020-11-18)

Ethnic minorities face rising disparity in homicide risk across England and Wales
Calculations now familiar from coronavirus coverage - cases per 100,000 people - applied to ethnicity and homicide victimisation in the UK for the first time. So far this century, Black Britons have been over five and a half times more likely to become murder victims than White British people. Researchers call on ONS and police forces to calculate and present more 'meaningful' crime data to aid prevention and public understanding. (2020-11-17)

Americans' attitudes about guns influenced by owners' race and gender
A new study from researchers at Rice University found that Americans' attitudes about gun ownership are impacted by the gender and race of firearms' potential owners. (2020-11-17)

Drawing the line to answer art's big questions
Algorithms have shown that the compositional structure of Western landscape paintings changed 'suspiciously' smoothly between 1500 and 2000 AD, potentially indicating a selection bias by art curators or in art historical literature, physicists from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) and colleagues report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). (2020-11-13)

Why do so many parents avoid talking about race?
BU social psychologists share ways adults can overcome their own assumptions and discomfort to talk honestly about race with children. (2020-11-13)

Study of infants finds that sleep differences by race, income emerge early
A new study led in part by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital takes a look at 24-hour sleep-wake cycles for infants across racial/ethnic and socioeconomic categories. The team found several distinct differences in sleep-wake patterns, largely explained by discrepancies in socioeconomic status. (2020-11-13)

Racial disparities in pediatric diabetes treatment
Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the third most common pediatric chronic disease in the United States, and the risk of the disease has risen sharply in non-Hispanic Black (NHB) children in the last 20 years, data show. Ironically, the significant advances in T1D therapeutics over recent years, especially new technologies, may have exacerbated racial disparities in diabetes treatment and outcomes. (2020-11-12)

Sociologists dispel the 'bad apple' excuse for racialized policing
According to a study by University of Miami sociologists published in the American Sociological Association's Contexts magazine, almost one of five police officers exhibit high levels of implicit, or unconscious, pro-white/anti-Black bias, and roughly one of eight officers exhibit high levels of explicit, or conscious, pro-white bias. (2020-11-11)

New genome alignment tool empowers large-scale studies of vertebrate evolution
Three papers published November 11 in Nature present major advances in understanding the evolution of birds and mammals, made possible by new methods for comparing the genomes of hundreds of species. Researchers at the UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute developed a powerful new genome alignment method that has made the new studies possible, including the largest genome alignment ever achieved of more than 600 vertebrate genomes. (2020-11-11)

Multiracial congregations in US have nearly tripled, Baylor University study finds
Racially diverse congregations have more than tripled in the United States over the past 20 years, and the percentage of all-white congregations has declined, according to a study by a Baylor University sociologist and two colleagues. (2020-11-11)

Losing the American Dream
As many Americans struggle to pay their bills, keeping up with mortgage payments can be daunting with the risk of losing one's home. The challenges to retain a home are stratified along racial differences. Black homeowners are twice as likely to lose their homes and transition back to renting than white homeowners, according to a recent Dartmouth-led study published in Demography. African American owners exit their homes at a rate of 10 percent compared with whites' exit rate of five percent. (2020-11-11)

Racial/ethnic minorities comprise small portion of patients referred with AL amyloidosis
Despite being theoretically at an increased risk for AL amyloidosis, underrepresented minorities make up only a small percentage of patients seen at specialized treatment centers for this disease. (2020-11-10)

Explaining the religious vote for Trump
New research by Louisiana State University sociologists indicate it wasn't Christian nationalism that drove churchgoers' Trump vote in 2016. Rather, surprisingly, Christian nationalism was important among non-churchgoers. (2020-11-10)

Black patients less likely to receive added, higher dose meds to control blood pressure
Racial inequities in treatment intensification - prescribing a new medication for hypertension or increasing the dose for existing medication - may be responsible for nearly one-third of racial disparities in treating the condition. Blood pressure control rates were lower in Black patients and higher in Asian American patients compared to other racial groups. (2020-11-09)

Serious disparities in care and outcomes found among Black and non-white heart patients
Adults who are Black or from other underrepresented racial/ethnic groups received up to 10% fewer early treatments for heart problems compared to white patients. When compared to whites, Black patients had longer hospital stays and fewer discharges to home. Hispanics, Asians, Pacific Islanders and Native Americans all had higher in-hospital death rates than white patients. (2020-11-09)

Soldiers benefit from psychological health research
Army scientists developed computer-based training to help Soldiers avoid unnecessary social conflict and mitigate anger-related outcomes. (2020-11-09)

You drive like a girl: Study shows gender bias in perceptions of ride-sharing performance
While digital brokerages provide a more efficient method for the exchange of goods and services and an improved way for consumers to voice their opinions about the quality of work they receive, bias and discrimination can emerge as part of the review process, according to Notre Dame research. (2020-11-09)

Study finds patients prefer doctors who share their same race/ethnicity
Patients who shared the same racial or ethnic background as their physician were more likely to give the maximum patient rating score, according to a new analysis of 117,589 patient surveys from 2014 to 2017. (2020-11-09)

Black patients with lupus have three times higher risk of stroke
New research reveals that, in the U.S., Black patients with lupus have a threefold higher risk of stroke and a 24-fold higher risk of ischemic heart disease. The study also found several lupus-specific symptoms that predict stroke and IHD in these patients. Details of the study was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College Rheumatology's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

Black patients with RA less likely to receive biologic, more likely to get glucocorticoids
A new study reveals that Black patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were less likely to be prescribed a biologic treatment and more likely to use glucocorticoids, which carry a risk of serious long-term side effects. This study highlights ongoing racial disparities in the care of patients with rheumatic disease. Details of the study was shared at ACR Convergence, the ACR's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

Minority patients with rheumatic diseases have worse COVID-19 outcomes
New research at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting, reveals that people of color with rheumatic disease have worse health outcomes from COVID-19 infection, are more likely to be hospitalized to treat their coronavirus infection, and are more likely to require invasive ventilator treatment. (2020-11-06)

Underinsurance is growing, but HSAs aren't keeping up: BU study
High deductible health plans (HDHPs) have become much more common among all racial/ethnic and income groups, but the health savings accounts (HSAs) that make these plans potentially workable are far less common among Black, Hispanic, and lower-income enrollees--and the gap is growing. (2020-11-06)

Different outcomes by race/ethnicity among patients with COVID-19 and rheumatic disease
Among US patients with rheumatic disease and COVID-19, racial/ethnic minorities had higher risks of needing to be hospitalized and put on ventilators. The findings come from an analysis published in Arthritis & Rheumatology. (2020-11-04)

Convection-permitting modelling improves simulated precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau
A China-UK research team explains the possible reasons for excessive precipitation over the TP in the mesoscale convection-parameterized models. (2020-11-04)

New form of brain-training helps prevent relapse after alcohol treatment
A recent study has shown that it may be possible to dampen the workings of the subconscious brain to prevent alcohol relapse, the results leading to a world-first trial of a personalized smartphone app called 'SWiPE'. (2020-11-04)

Discrimination increases against Asian and Asian American population, affecting health
Reports of racial discrimination against Asians and Asian-Americans have increased since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic hit the United States, coinciding with an increase in reported negative health symptoms, according to Washington State University researchers. (2020-11-02)

A versatile photodetector assisted by photovoltaic and bolometric effects
A versatile photodetector based on MoTe2/VO2 heterostructure integrates photovoltaic and bolometric effects. The photodetector can realize three different functional modes including p-n junction, bolometer and Schottky junction, satisfying the demand of ultrasensitive and ultrabroad spectrum response, showing great potential in advanced photodetector. (2020-11-01)

Study documents racial differences in US hospice use and end-of-life care preferences
In a new medical records analysis of racial disparities in end-of-life care, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and three collaborating institutions report that Black patients voluntarily seek substantially more intensive treatment in the last six months of life, while white patients more often choose hospice services. (2020-10-28)

Racial disparities in treatment for common lung cancer persist despite gains
African American patients with lung cancer are still less likely to receive the most effective treatment for a common type of early stage lung cancer. (2020-10-28)

Black Hispanic individuals hardest hit by COVID-19
Results from a new study led by Boston Medical Center (BMC) demonstrate the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on Hispanic groups within the US, with the most severe outcomes, including death and intensive care, among Hispanic Black individuals. (2020-10-27)

1 in 12 parents say their teen has attended a demonstration about racism or police reform
A growing number of demonstrators taking to the streets to protest police brutality and racial injustice may include teenagers, a new national poll suggests. (2020-10-26)

Racial, socioeconomic disparities in extensive-stage small cell lung cancer treatment
A new study shows that Black individuals with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer are less likely to receive chemotherapy for their disease compared to white and other racial groups. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center, the results indicate that individuals who are Black, elderly, uninsured, or have non-private health insurance and lower education levels, were less likely to be treated with chemotherapy for this type of lung cancer. (2020-10-26)

Study reveals details behind transplant disparities experienced by black patients
In an analysis of information on patients with kidney failure, Black patients are less likely than white patients to be placed on transplant waiting lists. For patients on such lists, Blacks are less likely to receive transplants than whites. Results from the study will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25. (2020-10-25)

Why do white Americans support both strict immigration policies and dream act?
White Americans support strict immigration policies while at the same time favor the DREAM Act that would grant legal status to some immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, a contradiction linked to racial resentment and the belief that equality already exists, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2020-10-22)

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