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Current Reading News and Events, Reading News Articles.
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Reading in company boosts creativity
Language has evolved as a consequence of social interaction; however, most research is conducted with participants in isolation. (2020-09-22)
Solar storm forecasts for Earth improved with help from the public
Scientists used observations recorded by members of the public to increase accuracy of computer model predictions of when harmful CMEs will hit Earth. (2020-09-18)
Complex phonological tests are useful for diagnosing reading dysfunction
HSE University researchers have confirmed that the level of phonological processing skills in children can impact their ability to master reading. (2020-09-18)
An evolutionary roll of the dice explains why we're not perfect
Scientists have found that chance events can be more important than natural selection in defining the genome of species like humans and other mammals. (2020-09-09)
Brain stimulation reduces dyslexia deficits
Restoring normal patterns of rhythmic neural activity through non-invasive electrical stimulation of the brain alleviates sound-processing deficits and improves reading accuracy in adults with dyslexia, according to a study published September 8, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Silvia Marchesotti and Anne-Lise Giraud of the University of Geneva, and colleagues. (2020-09-08)
Bilingual children may lose less brain matter as they grow up
Children and adolescents who speak more than one language may reach adulthood with better brain structure, according to a new study. (2020-09-02)
Heavy TV and computer use impacts children's academic results
Grade 3 students who watch more than two hours of TV daily or spend more than one hour a day on a computer experience a decline in academic results two years later, a new study has found. (2020-09-02)
Federal and state websites flunk COVID-19 reading-level review
Information about COVID-19 offered by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the White House, and state health departments failed to meet recommendations for communicating with the public. (2020-08-18)
Analysis shows that political speeches now use simpler language, express more sentiments
Research by Kansas State University shows how politicians from both major parties have changed their political speech from previous centuries. (2020-08-18)
Unread second-opinion radiology reports waste health care resources
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), 537 of 4,696 second-opinion reports--11.4%, likely underestimated, too--were not read by a clinician. (2020-08-13)
Young nearsighted kids benefit from bifocal contact lenses, study shows
Bifocal contact lenses aren't just for aging eyes anymore. In nearsighted kids as young as 7 years old, multifocal contact lenses with a heavy dose of added reading power can dramatically slow further progression of myopia, new research has found. (2020-08-11)
Key brain region was 'recycled' as humans developed the ability to read
An MIT study offers evidence that the brain's inferotemporal cortex, which is specialized to perform object recognition, has been repurposed for a key component of reading called orthographic processing -- the ability to recognize written letters and words. (2020-08-04)
Two studies suggest strategies to help students at community colleges and broad access institutions
A brief reading and writing exercise designed to alleviate worries about sense of belonging helped students at a midwestern broad-access public university with a high Hispanic population stay in school, raising continuous enrollment over 2 years by 9% among socially disadvantaged students, according to a new study. (2020-07-15)
Early childhood education centers can boost parents' engagement at home
When early childhood education centers communicate well with parents, those parents are more likely to engage in educational activities with their children at home, a new University of Arizona study finds. (2020-07-07)
Variability in natural speech is challenging for the dyslexic brain
A new study brings neural-level evidence that the continuous variation in natural speech makes the discrimination of phonemes challenging for adults suffering from developmental reading-deficit dyslexia. (2020-06-25)
Poor sleep significantly linked with teenage depression
Teenagers who experience very poor sleep may be more likely to experience poor mental health in later life, as depressed teens in study slept 30 minutes less per night than other groups. (2020-06-17)
Agroforestry is 'win win' for bees and crops, study shows
Agroforestry has long been suggested as a solution to halt the decline of pollinators, yet observational studies in temperate climates have been virtually non-existent. (2020-06-16)
The brain uses minimum effort to look for key information in text
The human brain avoids taking unnecessary effort. When a person is reading, she strives to gain as much information as possible by dedicating as little of her cognitive capacity as possible to the processing. (2020-06-11)
Better reading proficiency linked to fewer youth homicides
A good education system has long been linked with providing opportunity for people to get better jobs and escape poverty. (2020-06-11)
Speed of space storms key to protecting astronauts and satellites from radiation
Measuring the speed of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) as they erupt from the sun, in addition to their size, found to be crucial in providing accurate early warnings that keep astronauts and technology safe. (2020-06-10)
Boys' poor reading skills might help explain higher education gender gap
Researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Essex in the United Kingdom found boys' poor reading skills in adolescence, combined with the social attitudes about women attending college, can help explain why fewer men than women enroll in higher education or other types of post-high school education. (2020-06-08)
Yes, your dog wants to rescue you
Imagine you're a dog. Your owner is trapped in a box and is crying out for help. (2020-05-28)
Teleradiology enables social distancing during coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic
Transitioning from on-site interpretation of imaging studies to remote interpretation via home PACS workstations requires a careful balancing of hospital and departmental finances, engineering choices, and educational and philosophical workflow issues, according to an open-access article published ahead-of-print by the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR). (2020-05-21)
Just read my face, baby
Are you good at reading your partner's emotions? Your perceptiveness may very well strengthen your relationship. (2020-05-20)
School segregation by wealth creating unequal learning outcomes in the Global South
Millions of the world's poorest children are leaving school without mastering even basic levels of reading or maths because of an overlooked pattern of widespread, wealth-based inequalities in their countries' education systems, new research suggests. (2020-05-19)
Engineers develop low-cost, high-accuracy GPS-like system for flexible medical robots
Roboticists at the University of California San Diego have developed an affordable, easy to use system to track the location of flexible surgical robots inside the human body. (2020-05-18)
Climate change will bring bigger swings in European summer temperatures
Global average temperatures are set to increase under climate change, but temperature deviations in relation to this average will not be affected in the same way. (2020-05-18)
Cold War nuke tests changed rainfall
Historic records from weather stations show that rainfall patterns in Scotland were affected by charge in the atmosphere released by radiation from nuclear bomb tests carried out in the 1950s and '60s. (2020-05-13)
From scaffolding to screens: Understanding the developing brain for reading
In the debate about nature versus nurture for developing reading skills, cognitive neuroscientists have a clear message: both matter. (2020-05-04)
Reduced obesity for weighted-vest wearers
Scientists from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have found a new method of reducing human body weight and fat mass using weighted vests. (2020-04-30)
'Ethnic spaces' make minority students feel at home on campus
New research by the University of Washington and the University of Exeter examined the value that college students -- of many races -- place on ethnic cultural centers. (2020-04-27)
IKBFU and University of Oviedo Physicists tested new research model on magnetic materials
Laboratory of Novice Magnet Materials working in collaboration with Spanish scientists (the University of Oviedo, Spain) tested the Preisach model using interfacing Fe-based microwires. (2020-04-23)
Study of sewage finds link between different rates of sepsis in UK and presence of E. coli in the community
A study to be presented at European Congress on Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) shows that rates of Escherichia coli related sepsis in different regions of the UK could be directly linked to the levels of pathogenic (disease-causing) E. coli in the community, as determined by its presence in sewage in that area. (2020-04-17)
Little scientists: Children prefer storybooks that explain why and how things happen
Children have a never-ending curiosity about the world around them and frequently question how and why it works the way it does. (2020-04-15)
Children who read books daily score higher in school tests, vast new study states
What children choose to read outside school directly influences their academic performance, according to a major new study led by the University of Malaga and UCL, and published in the peer-reviewed journal Oxford Review of Education. (2020-02-27)
Do girls read better than boys? If so, gender stereotypes may be to blame
A new longitudinal study of fifth and sixth graders in Germany examined the relation between classmates' gender stereotypes and individual students' reading outcomes to shed light on how these stereotypes contribute to the gender gap in reading. (2020-02-26)
TMI: More information doesn't necessarily help people make better decisions
New research from Stevens Institute of Technology suggests that too much knowledge can lead people to make worse decisions, pointing to a critical gap in our understanding of how new information interacts with prior knowledge and beliefs. (2020-02-21)
When the best treatment for hypertension is to wait
A new study concluded that a physician's decision not to intensify hypertension treatment is often a contextually appropriate choice. (2020-02-18)
The use of jargon kills people's interest in science, politics
When scientists and others use their specialized jargon terms while communicating with the general public, the effects are much worse than just making what they're saying hard to understand. (2020-02-12)
AJR: Smartphone, laptop prove reliable and accurate for acute ischemic stroke decision
A unique assessment of imaging-based recommendations for the administration of IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator based on unenhanced brain CT scans, the results published ahead-of-print in this April article from the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) constitute a strong foundation for the development of mobile-based telestroke services because they increase neuroradiologist availability and the possibility of using reperfusion therapies in resource-limited countries. (2020-02-12)
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