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Current Reciprocity News and Events

Current Reciprocity News and Events, Reciprocity News Articles.
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Developmental psychology -- One good turn deserves another
Five-year-olds enforce reciprocal behavior in social interactions. A study by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich psychologists shows that children come to recognize reciprocity as a norm between the ages of 3 and 5. (2019-09-18)
Liberals and conservatives have different views on equity, but share 'protestant work ethic'
American liberals and conservatives have different views on equity, according to a new study focusing on Moral Foundations Theory, but are not that different from each other when it comes to the 'Protestant work ethic.' (2019-08-07)
From the Oscars to the Nobel Prize, winners need to choose their friends wisely
Being friends with an award juror can increase a person's chance of being nominated but decrease their chances of being selected as the victor, according to new research published in the Academy of Management Journal. (2019-07-12)
Most dog and cat owners not aware of pet blood donation schemes
Most dog and cat owners are not aware of pet blood donation schemes and animal blood banks, finds a survey of pet owners published in Vet Record. (2019-07-09)
PSU study finds people prefer to donate time -- even when charities lose out
Each year during the holiday season, soup kitchens and charities alike are flooded with offers to volunteer. (2019-06-24)
New time-banking system utilizes blockchain tech to measure one's value to society
Citizens from the island of Aneityum in the Republic of Vanuatu are working with faculty from Binghamton University, State University of New York to test their true value as humans. (2019-06-17)
Your circle of friends, not your Fitbit, is more predictive of your health
To get a better reading on your overall health and wellness, you'd be better off looking at the strength and structure of your circle of friends, according to a new study in the Public Library of Science journal, PLOS ONE. (2019-06-17)
It pays to be free: No-cost products garner strong word-of-mouth recommendations
Consumers who get a web-based product or mobile app for free are more likely to give it a word-of-mouth boost than a product they buy, suggesting they feel 'one good turn deserves another.' (2019-06-05)
How do we make moral decisions?
When it comes to making moral decisions, we often think of the golden rule: do unto others as you would have them do unto you. (2019-04-18)
New study questions effects of reintroducing top predators
There's little evidence that reintroducing top predators to ecosystems will return them to the conditions that existed before they were wiped out, according to new research. (2019-04-03)
Want to save the planet? Stop trying to be its friend
Research published in Frontiers in Psychology reveals how advertisers, politicians and economic systems play on the psychology of 'climate compensation' -- and encourages a more rational approach to environmental responsibility. (2019-03-04)
Scientists find routine allomaternal nursing in an Old World monkey
A team of scientists led by Professor Li Ming at the Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found widespread allomaternal nursing behavior in an Old World monkey, the golden snub-nosed monkey. (2019-02-22)
Seen for the first time: Golden snub-nosed monkeys nurse other females' infants
More than 87 percent of golden snub-nosed monkey infants evaluated in a five-year field study were nursed by females other than their mothers -- a phenomenon called allomaternal nursing. (2019-02-20)
Why does bribery work?
A new study from Carnegie Mellon University suggests that greed, and not the willingness to return the favor, is the main reason people give in to bribery. (2019-02-12)
Theoretical model may help solve molecular mystery
When it comes to realizing low-power electronic devices, spintronics looks promising. (2019-02-05)
Researchers defy 19th Century law of Physics in 21st century boost for energy efficiency
Research led by a University of Sussex scientist has turned a 156-year-old law of physics on its head. (2018-11-21)
No cooperation without open communication
In models that explore how humans act when their reputation is at stake, usually assumptions were made that are at odds with reality. (2018-11-12)
Gender equality and economic development promote gender-specific preferences
The more equal women's opportunities compared to men's, and the more resources women have, the more their preferences differ from men's, suggests a new study based on survey data from nearly 80 countries. (2018-10-18)
Rural and urban communities need different policies to boost economic mobility
The farther away from a city a person is raised, the more likely they are to climb the economic ladder, according to economists, who also found that community characteristics associated with upward mobility actually have different effects in rural and urban locations. (2018-09-12)
Study shows PR best practices are only second best
Charles Marsh has studied economic experiments, evolutionary biology and philosophy to examine how indirect reciprocity, or cooperation without expectation of payment, is actually a better approach to public relations than the dominant competition-based approach. (2018-06-07)
USTC develops all-optically controlled non-reciprocal multifunctional photonic devices
USTC Microcavity Research Group in the Key Laboratory of Quantum Information have perfected a 4-port all-optically controlled non-reciprocal multifunctional photonic device based on a magnetic-field-free optomechanical resonator is demonstrated for the first time. (2018-05-08)
Why children with autism may be at risk of bullying
Children with autism may be at risk from bullying because they are more willing to accept unfair behavior say psychologists. (2018-05-03)
Evolving cooperation
A new study shows that in repeated interactions winning strategies are either partners or rivals, but only partners allow for cooperation. (2018-04-24)
How lemurs win 'friends' and influence other lemurs
In human social networks, people often find it useful to spend time with others who are successful and well informed. (2018-04-05)
Online tech is changing the dynamics of gift-giving
Online gift-giving is spreading in social networks and causing people to give more gifts -- online and in person -- according to a new study led by René Kizilcec, Cornell University assistant professor of information science. (2018-03-21)
Are those who help the bad good or bad? The answer depends on adaptive architectures.
Are those who help the bad good or bad? Game theoreticians reveal that the answer depends on whether the society adopts 'individualism' or 'dividualism'. (2018-03-09)
A research study analyzes the mental health care community model
Results from the citizen science project 'Juegos x la salud mental', that analyzes interactions in the community formed by people with mental health problems, their family members, and caregivers, were presented and appeared in the journal Scientific Reports. (2018-03-08)
Scientists realize breakthrough in controlling the transmission of light
In the cover-story paper published in today's Nature Electronics, researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY) and at the University of Texas at Austin detail the development of a new light wave-isolation method. (2018-02-08)
Ways to make data sharing between the global north and south more fair
Many researchers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are hesitant to embrace open data policies. (2018-02-08)
New study debunks the theory of 'war-like' business competition in financial markets
A new study, 'Toward a Social Practice Theory of Relational Competing' shows that the perception of war-like competitiveness is flawed and misleading. (2018-01-25)
BU: More permissive concealed-carry laws linked to higher homicide rates
Easier access to concealed firearms is associated with significantly higher rates of handgun-related homicide, according to a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health researcher. (2017-10-19)
Asymmetric sound absorption lets in the light
Many asymmetric absorbers are currently based on a single-port system, where sound enters one side and is absorbed before a rigid wall. (2017-10-06)
Solidarity between good and justice keeps a society together
Soka University researcher Isamu Okada and his collaborators Tatsuya Sasaki (University of Vienna) and Yutaka Nakai (Shibaura Institute of Technology) have found that the solidarity of philanthropism and reciprocity is necessary to maintain cooperative societies. (2017-09-22)
Teens' ability to consider the intentions of others linked to structural changes in the brain
When it comes to the concept of fairness, teenagers' ability to consider the intentions of others appears to be linked to structural changes underway in the brain, according to a Dartmouth-led study published by Scientific Reports. (2017-09-13)
Cooperation driven by reciprocity, not conformity
From an evolutionary perspective, cooperating with others can yield benefits that increase chances of survival. (2017-09-11)
Higher levels of cooperation for provision than for maintenance of public goods
A research team was able to show that people are less willing to cooperate to maintain public goods than to provide new ones. (2017-08-30)
Modeling human psychology
A human being's psychological make-up depends on an array of emotional and motivational parameters. (2017-08-16)
A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved at EPFL
EPFL researchers have found a way around what was considered a fundamental limitation of physics for over 100 years. (2017-06-22)
Achieving near-perfect optical isolation using opto-mechanical transparency
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated a new level of optical isolation necessary to advance on-chip optical signal processing. (2017-05-09)
Differences in levels of trust and power can affect buyer-supplier performance
Mutual trust does not appear on the ledger sheets of buyers and suppliers, but researchers suggest that levels of trust between companies may be an important influence on how they operate and perform. (2017-05-05)
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