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Current Reciprocity News and Events

Current Reciprocity News and Events, Reciprocity News Articles.
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Weaving Indigenous knowledge with scientific research: a balanced approach
Insights from bicultural research can enhance practical applications from a palaeotsunami database to land-use decisions, according to a new review in Earth Surface Dynamics (2020-07-16)
Is not helping a bad person good or bad?
A research team led by Hitoshi Yamamoto from Rissho University has analyzed how the social norm of indirect reciprocity is adopted in human society and revealed results that contradicted previous theoretical predictions. (2020-07-01)
'One-way' electronic devices enter the mainstream
Columbia engineers are the first to build a high-performance non-reciprocal device on a compact chip with a performance 25 times better than previous work. (2020-05-21)
Parent-led discussion about mutual strengths benefits parent-teen communication
A primary care-based intervention to promote parent-teen communication led to less distress and increased positive emotions among adolescents, as well as improved communication for many teens, according to a new study by researchers at the Center for Parent and Teen Communication at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). (2020-05-19)
Researchers use machine learning to unearth underground Instagram 'pods'
Not all engagement with posts on social networks is organic, according to a team of researchers at New York University Tandon School of Engineering and Drexel University, who have published the first analysis of a robust underground ecosystem of ''pods.'' These groups of users manipulate curation algorithms and artificially boost content popularity -- whether to increase the reach of promoted content or amplify rhetoric -- through a tactic known as ''reciprocity abuse,'' whereby each member reciprocally interacts with content posted by other members of the group. (2020-04-27)
Web of psychological cues may tempt people to reveal more online
While most people will say they are extremely concerned with their online privacy, previous experiments have shown that, in practice, users readily divulge privacy information online. (2020-04-25)
Flat-panel technology could transform antennas, wireless and cell phone communications
Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are reinventing the mirror, at least for microwaves, potentially replacing the familiar 3-D dishes and microwave horns we see on rooftops and cell towers with flat panels that are compact, versatile, and better adapted for modern communication technologies. (2020-03-23)
'Feeling obligated' can impact relationships during social distancing
In a time where many are practicing 'social distancing' from the outside world, people are relying on their immediate social circles more than usual. (2020-03-19)
In acoustic waves, engineers break reciprocity with 'spacetime-varying metamaterials'
Working in an emerging field known to as 'spacetime-varying metamaterials,' University at Buffalo engineers have demonstrated the ability to break reciprocity in acoustic waves. (2020-02-17)
A conversation could be the answer to successful rehabilitation of prisoners
Researchers have found people on the brink of release from a prison sentence have lost any sense of being connected to the outside world and, as a result, become prejudiced towards wider society. (2020-01-09)
Space-time metasurface makes light reflect only in one direction
Breaking reciprocity is important in optical systems that require asymmetric flow of light, such as full-duplex communication systems and lasers. (2019-12-20)
Asking if behavior can be changed on climate crisis
One of the more complex problems facing social psychologists today is whether any intervention can move people to change their behavior about climate change and protecting the environment for the sake of future generations. (2019-11-20)
Prisoner's dilemma game reveals cooperation leads to leadership
Game theory has historically studied cooperation and hierarchy, and has sought to explain why individuals cooperate, even though they might be better off not to do so. (2019-10-23)
Developmental psychology -- One good turn deserves another
Five-year-olds enforce reciprocal behavior in social interactions. A study by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich psychologists shows that children come to recognize reciprocity as a norm between the ages of 3 and 5. (2019-09-18)
Liberals and conservatives have different views on equity, but share 'protestant work ethic'
American liberals and conservatives have different views on equity, according to a new study focusing on Moral Foundations Theory, but are not that different from each other when it comes to the 'Protestant work ethic.' (2019-08-07)
From the Oscars to the Nobel Prize, winners need to choose their friends wisely
Being friends with an award juror can increase a person's chance of being nominated but decrease their chances of being selected as the victor, according to new research published in the Academy of Management Journal. (2019-07-12)
Most dog and cat owners not aware of pet blood donation schemes
Most dog and cat owners are not aware of pet blood donation schemes and animal blood banks, finds a survey of pet owners published in Vet Record. (2019-07-09)
PSU study finds people prefer to donate time -- even when charities lose out
Each year during the holiday season, soup kitchens and charities alike are flooded with offers to volunteer. (2019-06-24)
New time-banking system utilizes blockchain tech to measure one's value to society
Citizens from the island of Aneityum in the Republic of Vanuatu are working with faculty from Binghamton University, State University of New York to test their true value as humans. (2019-06-17)
Your circle of friends, not your Fitbit, is more predictive of your health
To get a better reading on your overall health and wellness, you'd be better off looking at the strength and structure of your circle of friends, according to a new study in the Public Library of Science journal, PLOS ONE. (2019-06-17)
It pays to be free: No-cost products garner strong word-of-mouth recommendations
Consumers who get a web-based product or mobile app for free are more likely to give it a word-of-mouth boost than a product they buy, suggesting they feel 'one good turn deserves another.' (2019-06-05)
How do we make moral decisions?
When it comes to making moral decisions, we often think of the golden rule: do unto others as you would have them do unto you. (2019-04-18)
New study questions effects of reintroducing top predators
There's little evidence that reintroducing top predators to ecosystems will return them to the conditions that existed before they were wiped out, according to new research. (2019-04-03)
Want to save the planet? Stop trying to be its friend
Research published in Frontiers in Psychology reveals how advertisers, politicians and economic systems play on the psychology of 'climate compensation' -- and encourages a more rational approach to environmental responsibility. (2019-03-04)
Scientists find routine allomaternal nursing in an Old World monkey
A team of scientists led by Professor Li Ming at the Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found widespread allomaternal nursing behavior in an Old World monkey, the golden snub-nosed monkey. (2019-02-22)
Seen for the first time: Golden snub-nosed monkeys nurse other females' infants
More than 87 percent of golden snub-nosed monkey infants evaluated in a five-year field study were nursed by females other than their mothers -- a phenomenon called allomaternal nursing. (2019-02-20)
Why does bribery work?
A new study from Carnegie Mellon University suggests that greed, and not the willingness to return the favor, is the main reason people give in to bribery. (2019-02-12)
Theoretical model may help solve molecular mystery
When it comes to realizing low-power electronic devices, spintronics looks promising. (2019-02-05)
Researchers defy 19th Century law of Physics in 21st century boost for energy efficiency
Research led by a University of Sussex scientist has turned a 156-year-old law of physics on its head. (2018-11-21)
No cooperation without open communication
In models that explore how humans act when their reputation is at stake, usually assumptions were made that are at odds with reality. (2018-11-12)
Gender equality and economic development promote gender-specific preferences
The more equal women's opportunities compared to men's, and the more resources women have, the more their preferences differ from men's, suggests a new study based on survey data from nearly 80 countries. (2018-10-18)
Rural and urban communities need different policies to boost economic mobility
The farther away from a city a person is raised, the more likely they are to climb the economic ladder, according to economists, who also found that community characteristics associated with upward mobility actually have different effects in rural and urban locations. (2018-09-12)
Study shows PR best practices are only second best
Charles Marsh has studied economic experiments, evolutionary biology and philosophy to examine how indirect reciprocity, or cooperation without expectation of payment, is actually a better approach to public relations than the dominant competition-based approach. (2018-06-07)
USTC develops all-optically controlled non-reciprocal multifunctional photonic devices
USTC Microcavity Research Group in the Key Laboratory of Quantum Information have perfected a 4-port all-optically controlled non-reciprocal multifunctional photonic device based on a magnetic-field-free optomechanical resonator is demonstrated for the first time. (2018-05-08)
Why children with autism may be at risk of bullying
Children with autism may be at risk from bullying because they are more willing to accept unfair behavior say psychologists. (2018-05-03)
Evolving cooperation
A new study shows that in repeated interactions winning strategies are either partners or rivals, but only partners allow for cooperation. (2018-04-24)
How lemurs win 'friends' and influence other lemurs
In human social networks, people often find it useful to spend time with others who are successful and well informed. (2018-04-05)
Online tech is changing the dynamics of gift-giving
Online gift-giving is spreading in social networks and causing people to give more gifts -- online and in person -- according to a new study led by René Kizilcec, Cornell University assistant professor of information science. (2018-03-21)
Are those who help the bad good or bad? The answer depends on adaptive architectures.
Are those who help the bad good or bad? Game theoreticians reveal that the answer depends on whether the society adopts 'individualism' or 'dividualism'. (2018-03-09)
A research study analyzes the mental health care community model
Results from the citizen science project 'Juegos x la salud mental', that analyzes interactions in the community formed by people with mental health problems, their family members, and caregivers, were presented and appeared in the journal Scientific Reports. (2018-03-08)
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