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Current Recognition News and Events

Current Recognition News and Events, Recognition News Articles.
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Controlling ion recognition in reactive host-guest systems
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in the Journal of the American Chemical Society that in reactive host-guest systems, both the molecular recognition and the chemical reaction can happen first. (2019-10-17)
Lab develops novel approach to study sound recognition in acoustically orienting animals
A new study by Dr. Norman Lee, in collaboration with St. (2019-09-20)
Sound deprivation in one ear leads to speech recognition difficulties
Chronic conductive hearing loss, which can result from middle-ear infections, has been linked to speech recognition deficits, according to the results of a new study of 240 patients, led by scientists at Massachusetts Eye and Ear. (2019-09-06)
Emotion recognition deficits impede community integration after traumatic brain injury
Dr. Helen Genova: 'Our findings suggest that deficits in facial emotion recognition may contribution to the social isolation experienced by so many people with traumatic brain injury. (2019-08-30)
New findings on human speech recognition at TU Dresden
Neuroscientists at TU Dresden were able to prove that speech recognition in humans begins in the sensory pathways from the ear to the cerebral cortex and not, as previously assumed, exclusively in the cerebral cortex itself. (2019-08-28)
Skeletal shapes key to rapid recognition of objects
In the blink of an eye, the human visual system can process an object, determining whether it's a cup or a sock within milliseconds, and with seemingly little effort. (2019-08-20)
New test to snare those lying about a person's identity
A new test developed by the University of Stirling could help police to determine when criminals or witnesses are lying about their knowledge of a person's identity. (2019-08-07)
Study gives insight into sun-induced DNA damage and cell repair
A team led by a Baylor University researcher has published a breakthrough article that provides a better understanding of the dynamic process by which sunlight-induced DNA damage is recognized by the molecular repair machinery in cells as needing repair. (2019-07-14)
HSE scholars propose new method for measuring individual well-being
Researchers at HSE University have applied an emotion recognition method to measure the subjective well-being of individuals. (2019-07-10)
Simple 'smart' glass reveals the future of artificial vision
University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers have devised a method to create pieces of 'smart' glass that can recognize images without requiring any sensors or circuits or power sources. (2019-07-08)
Study: Poor women are more hopeful than poor men
The researchers concluded that even when men are poor and unemployed, their recognition and role is tied to work, money, and markets. (2019-07-08)
More money, skills and knowledge needed for social prescribing to serve as route into work
A new report from The Work Foundation, Embedding Work and Related Outcomes into Social Prescribing: Overcoming Challenges and Maximising Opportunities, says social prescribing can be an effective means of integrating people into work. (2019-07-04)
Study provides insights into depression in people with inflammatory bowel disease
Depression is common in people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the actual causes of depression in this group are unknown. (2019-07-03)
Scientists propose gait-based biometric identification method for the old with wearable devices
Professor Li Ye and his colleagues Dr. Sun Fangmin and Dr. (2019-06-28)
A wearable vibration sensor for accurate voice recognition
Professor Kilwon Cho of Chemical Engineering and Professor Yoonyoung Chung of Electronic and Electric Engineering from POSTECH successfully developed a flexible and wearable vibration responsive sensor. (2019-06-24)
Neural networks taught to recognize similar objects on videos without accuracy degradation
Andrey Savchenko, Professor at the Higher School of Economics (HSE University), has developed a method that can help to enhance image identification on videos. (2019-06-21)
Children's brains reorganize after epilepsy surgery to retain visual perception
Children can keep full visual perception -- the ability to process and understand visual information -- after brain surgery for severe epilepsy, according to a study funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2019-06-04)
Raw or cooked: this is how we recognise food
Do we see an apple? The occipital cortex in our brain will activate itself to recognise it. (2019-05-30)
New framework improves performance of deep neural networks
Researchers have developed a new framework for building deep neural networks via grammar-guided network generators. (2019-05-21)
Structural and functional mechanisms of a new class of bacterial sigma/anti-sigma factors revealed
Prof. FENG Yingang and his colleagues from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently revealed the structural and functional mechanism of the SigI/RsgI factors from C. thermocellum. (2019-05-19)
Miro2 is a Parkin receptor for selective removal of damaged mitochondria
Defects in mitophagy are linked to a variety of human diseases including Parkinson's and cardiac disorders. (2019-05-16)
Half a face enough for recognition technology
Facial recognition technology works even when only half a face is visible, researchers from the University of Bradford have found. (2019-05-01)
Widespread brain connections enable face recognition
Remembering a familiar face engages a wider network of brain regions than previously thought, according to a study of healthy men and women published in JNeurosci. (2019-04-29)
Bacteria use their enemy -- phage -- for 'self-recognition'
Scientists discovered that cells can distinguish themselves from closely related competitors through the use of a virus, and the harboring of phage in bacterial genomes benefits host cells when facing competitors in the environment. (2019-04-22)
Peptide keeps predatory nematodes from eating their kin
A small peptide produced in the skin of predatory nematodes prevents them from cannibalizing their immediate family members, while they feed upon their close relatives, a new study finds. (2019-04-04)
Ready, steady, go: 2 new studies reveal the steps in plant immune receptor activation
Two landmark studies provide unprecedented structural insight into how plant immune receptors are primed -- and then activated -- to provide plants with resistance against microbial pathogens. (2019-04-04)
HSE researchers teach neural networks to determine crowd emotions
Scholars from the Higher School of Economics have developed an algorithm that detects emotions in a group of people on a low-quality video. (2019-03-19)
Earning a bee's wings
When a honey bee turns 21 days old, she leaves the nest to look for pollen and nectar. (2019-02-26)
Face it. Our faces don't always reveal our true emotions
When it comes to reading a person's state of mind, visual context -- as in background and action -- is just as important as facial expressions and body language, according to a new study from the University of California, Berkeley. (2019-02-25)
Plants can skip the middlemen to directly recognize disease-causing fungi
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne have revealed that direct physical associations between plant immune proteins and fungal molecules are widespread during attempted infection. (2019-02-19)
Catch me if you can: Study reveals disguises are surprisingly effective
In a new study, led by researchers at the universities of York and Huddersfield, disguises reduced the ability of participants to match faces by around 30 percent, even when they were warned that some of the people had changed the way they look. (2019-02-18)
Linking sensing to signaling during plant immunity
A new study by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIPZ) in Cologne has revealed that a previously unappreciated structural feature underlies the ability of the plant immune molecule EDS1 to provide a timely defense boost against pathogens. (2019-02-15)
Oral contraceptives could impair women's recognition of complex emotions
Women who take the pill are nearly 10 percent worse at recognizing subtle expressions of complex emotions like pride or contempt, according to research published in Frontiers in Neuroscience. (2019-02-11)
Toward automated animal identification in wildlife research
A new program developed by researchers from Penn State and Microsoft Azure automatically detects regions of interest within images, alleviating a serious bottleneck in processing photos for wildlife research. (2019-02-11)
New legislation needed to regulate police facial recognition technology
Facial recognition technology, being trialled by two major police forces in Britain, should be subjected to more rigorous testing and transparency, according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) and Monash University. (2019-02-07)
In test of wisdom, new research favors Yoda over Spock
A person's ability to reason wisely about a challenging situation may improve when they also experience diverse yet balanced emotions, say researchers from the University of Waterloo. (2019-01-28)
Sustainable choices on palm oil must be easier for consumers, says new study
Consumer goods companies and retailers need to be upfront about where palm oil in their products comes from to relieve consumers of the burden of making sustainable choices. (2019-01-03)
Interpreting emotions: A matter of confidence
We are exposed to the facial expressions of the people. (2018-12-21)
Neural network taught to detect age and gender by video almost 20 percent more accurately
Researchers from the Higher School of Economics have created a technology to help neural networks identify certain people on video, detecting their age and gender more quickly and accurately. (2018-12-20)
How marijuana may damage teenage brains in study using genetically vulnerable mice
In a study of adolescent mice with a version of a gene linked to serious human mental illnesses, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have uncovered a possible explanation for how marijuana may damage the brains of some human teens. (2018-12-17)
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