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Current Recycling News and Events

Current Recycling News and Events, Recycling News Articles.
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Six degrees of nuclear separation
For the first time, Argonne scientists have printed 3D parts that pave the way to recycling up to 97 percent of the waste produced by nuclear reactors. (2019-10-11)
Reducing, reusing Europe's 2.5 million tonnes of plastic in e-waste each year
Plastics account for about 20% of materials in electronic and electrical equipment (EEE); most isn't designed for recovery and reuse. (2019-10-10)
For the first time, UMD professor observes crystallized iron product, hemozoin, made in mammals
For the first time ever, a UMD professor has observed a crystallized iron product called hemozoin being made in mammals, with widespread implications for future research and treatment of blood disorders. (2019-10-01)
First fully rechargeable carbon dioxide battery with carbon neutrality
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago are the first to show that lithium-carbon dioxide batteries can be designed to operate in a fully rechargeable manner, and they have successfully tested a lithium-carbon dioxide battery prototype running up to 500 consecutive cycles of charge/recharge processes. (2019-09-25)
Learning to read boosts the visual brain
How does learning to read change our brain? Does reading take up brain space dedicated to seeing objects such as faces, tools or houses? (2019-09-18)
Parasitology: Mother cells as organelle donors
Microbiologists at LMU and UoG have discovered a recycling process in the eukaryotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii that plays a vital role in the organism's unusual mode of reproduction. (2019-09-13)
Not all meat is created equal: How diet changes can sustain world's food production
David Vaccari, an environmental engineer at Stevens Institute of Technology, has created a model that predicts how several different conservation approaches could reduce demand for a nonrenewable resource that is absolutely vital for feeding the world: phosphorus. (2019-09-06)
Corals take control of nitrogen recycling
Corals use sugar from their symbiotic algal partners to control them by recycling nitrogen from their own ammonium waste. (2019-09-03)
Beetle scales hold secret to creating sustainable paint from recycled plastic, research shows
The structure of ultra-white beetle scales could hold the key to making bright-white sustainable paint using recycled plastic waste, scientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered. (2019-08-29)
Producing protein batteries for safer, environmentally friendly power storage
Proteins are good for building muscle, but their building blocks also might be helpful for building sustainable organic batteries that could someday be a viable substitute for conventional lithium-ion batteries, without their safety and environmental concerns. (2019-08-26)
Here's how early humans evaded immunodeficiency viruses
The cryoEM structure of a simian immunodeficiency virus protein bound to primate proteins shows how a mutation in early humans allowed our ancestors to escape infection while monkeys and apes did not. (2019-08-22)
Deciphering pancreatic cancer's invade and evade tactics
Two known gene mutations induce pathways that enhance pancreatic cancer's ability to invade tissues and evade the immune system. (2019-08-05)
Drop of ancient seawater rewrites Earth's history
The remains of a microscopic drop of ancient seawater has assisted in rewriting the history of Earth's evolution when it was used to re-establish the time that plate tectonics started on the planet. (2019-08-01)
Molecular biophysics -- the ABC of ribosome recycling
Ribosomes, the essential machinery used for protein synthesis is recycled after each one round of translation. (2019-07-25)
Biochemistry: Versatile recycling in the cell
Ribosomes need regenerating. This process is important for the quality of the proteins produced and thus for the whole cell homeostasis as well as for developmental and biological processes. (2019-07-18)
Algae-killing viruses spur nutrient recycling in oceans
Scientists have confirmed that viruses can kill marine algae called diatoms and that diatom die-offs near the ocean surface may provide nutrients and organic matter for recycling by other algae, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2019-07-18)
The physiology of survival
Bacteria do not simply perish in hunger phases fortuitously; rather, the surrounding cells have a say as well. (2019-07-17)
Improving heat recycling with the thermodiffusion effect
In a study recently published in EPJ E, researchers find that the absorption of water vapour within industrial heat recycling devices is directly tied to a physical process known as the thermodiffusion effect. (2019-07-15)
Solar power with a free side of drinking water
An integrated system seamlessly harnesses sunlight to cogenerate electricity and fresh water. (2019-07-10)
Awareness of product transformation increases recycling
A plastic bottle becomes a jacket, an aluminum can a bicycle. (2019-07-10)
Why is east Asian summer monsoon circulation enhanced under global warming?
A collaborated study shows that the Tibetan Plateau plays an essential role in enhancing the East Asian summer monsoon circulation under global warming through enhanced latent heating over the Tibetan Plateau. (2019-07-08)
Parasitology -- On filaments and fountains
Microbiologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that Toxoplasma gondii, the parasite that is responsible for toxoplasmosis, utilizes at least two modes of locomotion during its infection cycle. (2019-07-02)
Toxic substances found in the glass and decoration of alcoholic beverage bottles
New research by the University of Plymouth shows that bottles of beer, wine and spirits contain potentially harmful levels of toxic elements, such as lead and cadmium, in their enamelled decorations. (2019-06-28)
New unprinting method can help recycle paper and curb environmental costs
Imagine if your printer had an 'unprint' button that used pulses of light to remove toner - and thereby quintupled the lifespan of recycled paper. (2019-06-26)
National trash: Reducing waste produced in US national parks
When you think of national parks, you might picture the vast plateaus of the Grand Canyon, the intricate wetlands of the Everglades, or the inspiring viewscapes of the Grand Tetons. (2019-06-25)
Scientists unearth green treasure -- albeit rusty -- in the soil
Cornell University engineers have taken a step in understanding how iron in the soil may unlock naturally occurring phosphorus bound in organic matter, which can be used in fertilizer, so that one day farmers may be able to reduce the amount of artificial fertilizers applied to fields. (2019-06-17)
Carbon-neutral fuels move a step closer
Chemists at EPFL have developed an efficient process for converting carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide, a key ingredient of synthetic fuels and materials. (2019-06-13)
Bacteria's protein quality control agent offers insight into origins of life
The discoveries not only offer new directions for fighting the virulence of some of humanity's most dangerous pathogens, they have implications for our understanding of how life itself evolved. (2019-05-30)
Early humans deliberately recycled flint to create tiny, sharp tools
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that prehistoric humans 'recycled' discarded or broken flint tools 400,000 years ago to create small, sharp utensils with specific functions. (2019-05-29)
How to program materials
Can the properties of composite materials be predicted? Empa scientists have mastered this feat and thus can help achieve research objectives faster. (2019-05-21)
People recycle more when they know what recyclable waste becomes
A new study shows that consumers recycle more when they think about how their waste can be transformed into new products. (2019-05-16)
Clean and effective electronic waste recycling
E-waste recycling is far below what it should be to reduce its impact on the environment and human health simply because it is not economically feasible. (2019-05-15)
Plastic gets a do-over: Breakthrough discovery recycles plastic from the inside out
A team of researchers at Berkeley Lab has designed a recyclable plastic that, like a Lego playset, can be disassembled into its constituent parts at the molecular level, and then reassembled into a different shape, texture, and color again and again without loss of performance or quality. (2019-05-06)
Missing molecule hobbles cell movement
Cells are the body's workers, and they often need to move around to do their jobs. (2019-05-03)
Plant cells eat their own ... membranes and oil droplets
Biochemists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have discovered two ways that autophagy, or self-eating, controls the levels of oils in plant cells. (2019-04-29)
Why researchers are mapping the world's manure
Farmers rely on phosphorus fertilizers to enrich the soil and ensure bountiful harvests, but the world's recoverable reserves of phosphate rocks, from which such fertilizers are produced, are finite and unevenly distributed. (2019-04-17)
Researchers improve method to recycle and renew used cathodes from lithium-ion batteries
UC San Diego researchers have improved their recycling process that regenerates degraded cathodes from spent lithium-ion batteries. (2019-04-17)
Plastic's carbon footprint
From campaigns against microplastics to news of the great Pacific garbage patch, public awareness is growing about the outsized effect plastic has on the world's oceans. (2019-04-15)
'Molecular scissors' for plastic waste
A research team from the University of Greifswald and Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin (HZB) has solved the molecular structure of the enzyme MHETase at BESSY II. (2019-04-12)
Bacteria surrounding coral reefs change in synchrony, even across great distance
A study published in Nature Communications revealed that the bacteria present in the water overlying dozens of coral reefs changed dramatically during the night, and then returned to the same daytime community as observed the morning before. (2019-04-12)
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