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Current Red blood cells News and Events, Red blood cells News Articles.
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Healthy blood vessels may delay cognitive decline
High blood pressure may affect conditions such as Alzheimer's disease by interfering with the brain's waste management system, according to new research in rats published in JNeurosci. (2019-06-17)
New assay detects patients' resistance to antimalarial drugs from a drop of blood
Antimalarial drugs appear to follow a typical pattern, with early effectiveness eventually limited by the emergence of drug resistance. (2019-06-13)
Researchers develop new method to rapidly, reliably monitor sickle cell disease
Researchers have developed a rapid and reliable new method to continuously monitor sickle cell disease using a microfluidics-based electrical impedance sensor. (2019-06-13)
Common conditions keep many patients out of knee cartilage research studies
Issues like age or existing arthritis may preclude patients from participating in clinical studies for new therapies that could benefit them (2019-06-13)
Identification of protective antibodies may be key to effective malaria vaccine
Researchers from the University of Oxford, along with partners from five institutions around the world, have identified the human antibodies that prevent the malaria parasite from entering blood cells, which may be key to creating a highly effective malaria vaccination. (2019-06-13)
Lowering cholesterol is not enough to reduce hyperactivity of the immune system
Despite treatment with statins, many patients with elevated cholesterol levels will still develop cardiovascular disease. (2019-06-13)
Encouraging critically necessary blood donation among minorities
Better community education and communication are critical for increasing levels of blood donation among minorities, according to a study by researchers at Georgia State University and Georgia Southern University. (2019-06-13)
Researchers identify human protein that aids development of malaria parasite
Researchers in Japan have discovered that the Plasmodium parasites responsible for malaria rely on a human liver cell protein for their development into a form capable of infecting red blood cells and causing disease. (2019-06-12)
Reaching and grasping -- Learning fine motor coordination changes the brain
When we train the reaching for and grasping of objects, we also train our brain. (2019-06-12)
Sweating for science: A sauna session is just as exhausting as moderate exercise
Your blood pressure does not drop during a sauna visit - it rises, as well as your heart rate. (2019-06-12)
First blood-brain barrier chip using stem cells developed by Ben-Gurion University researchers
''By combining organ-chip technology and human iPSC-derived tissue, we have created a neurovascular unit that recapitulates complex BBB functions, provides a platform for modeling inheritable neurological disorders, and advances drug screening, as well as personalized medicine,'' Ben-Gurion University researcher Dr. (2019-06-12)
Sensitive, noninvasive platform detects circulating tumor cells in melanoma patients
Scientists have created a laser-based platform that can quickly and noninvasively screen large quantities of blood in patients with melanoma to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) -- a precursor to deadly metastases. (2019-06-12)
Sickle cell disease needs more attention
Article signed by researchers affiliated with institutions in the US, UK, Ghana and Brazil highlights recent progress in diagnosis and treatment but warns that more screening of newborns is needed. (2019-06-12)
Breathing new life into dye-sensitized solar cells
Japanese researchers are poised to reboot the field of aromatic-fused porphyrin sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells, the most efficient solar efficient solar technology available at present. (2019-06-12)
Increasing red meat consumption linked with higher risk of premature death
People who increased their daily servings of red meat over an eight-year period were more likely to die during the subsequent eight years compared to people who did not increase their red meat consumption, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. (2019-06-12)
Increasing red meat intake linked with heightened risk of death
Increasing red meat intake, particularly processed red meat, is associated with a heightened risk of death, suggests a large US study published in The BMJ today. (2019-06-12)
Cardiovascular diseases -- Promoting self-healing after heart attack
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers led by Oliver Söhnlein have shown that a protein which stimulates the resolution of inflammatory reactions enhances cardiac repair following heart attack in both mice and pigs. (2019-06-11)
New pathogens in beef and cow's milk products: More research required
In February 2019, the German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ) presented findings on new infection pathogens that go by the name of 'Bovine Milk and Meat Factors' (BMMF). (2019-06-11)
Are blood donor sex, pregnancy history and death of transfusion recipients associated?
Whether blood donors' sex and pregnancy history were associated with death for red blood cell transfusion recipients was investigated in this study that analyzed data from three study groups totaling more than 1 million transfusion recipients. (2019-06-11)
Red blood cell donor pregnancy history not tied to mortality after transfusion
A new study has found that the sex or pregnancy history of red blood cell donors does not influence the risk of death among patients who receive their blood. (2019-06-11)
Researchers reveal key role of pressure-sensing protein in lung edema
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago describe for the first time the role of a unique, pressure-sensing protein in the development of lung edema -- a condition in which chronic high vascular pressure in the lungs causes fluid from the bloodstream to enter the air spaces of the lungs. (2019-06-11)
New research could help predict seizures before they happen
A new study has found a pattern of molecules that appear in the blood before a seizure happens. (2019-06-10)
Stanford researchers synthesize healing compounds in scorpion venom
Stanford chemists have identified and synthesized two new healing compounds in scorpion venom that are effective at killing staph and tuberculosis bacteria. (2019-06-10)
Scientists recreate blood-brain barrier defect outside the body
Scientists can't make a living copy of your brain outside your body. (2019-06-06)
Researchers spot mutations that crop up in normal cells as we age
Cell division is not perfect. As we get older, mutations often appear in genes in normal cells. (2019-06-06)
Bird personalities influenced by both age and experience, study shows
For birds, differences in personality are a function of both age and experience, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-06-06)
Unsalted tomato juice may help lower heart disease risk
In a study published in Food Science & Nutrition, drinking unsalted tomato juice lowered blood pressure and LDL cholesterol in Japanese adults at risk of cardiovascular disease. (2019-06-05)
Study follows the health of older adults with prediabetes problems
In a Journal of Internal Medicine study that followed older adults with prediabetes for 12 years, most remained stable or reverted to normal blood sugar levels, and only one-third developed diabetes or died. (2019-06-05)
New study sheds light on how blood vessel damage from high glucose concentrations unfolds
A mechanism in the cells that line our blood vessels that helps them to process glucose becomes uncontrolled in diabetes, and could be linked to the formation of blood clots and inflammation according to researchers from the University of Warwick. (2019-06-05)
Scientists discover how hepatitis C 'ghosts' our immune system
Scientists from Trinity College Dublin have discovered how the highly infectious and sometimes deadly hepatitis C virus (HCV) 'ghosts' our immune system and remains undiagnosed in many people. (2019-06-05)
Combating undetected lung inflammation in patients with an autoimmune disorder
An observational study involving 50 patients with APECED -- a genetic autoimmune disorder -- has demonstrated that targeting T and B cell activity combats a serious lung-related complication often overlooked or misdiagnosed in patients with the condition. (2019-06-05)
A new way to block malaria transmission by targeting young contagious parasite forms
Boosting our natural antibody responses against the transmissible parasite stage could hold the key to combatting the malaria parasite and preventing the spread of the disease. (2019-06-05)
Red and white meats are equally bad for cholesterol
Contrary to popular belief, consuming red meat and white meat such as poultry, have equal effects on blood cholesterol levels, according to a study published today in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. (2019-06-04)
Gene mutation evolved to cope with modern high-sugar diets
A common gene mutation helps people cope with modern diets by keeping blood sugar low, but close to half of people still have an older variant that may be better suited to prehistoric diets, finds a new UCL-led study. (2019-06-04)
Zebrafish capture a 'window' on the cancer process
Cancer-related inflammation impacts significantly on cancer development and progression. New research has observed in zebrafish, for the first time, that inflammatory cells use weak spots or micro-perforations in the extracellular matrix barrier layer to access skin cancer cells. (2019-06-04)
'Citizen scientists' help track foxes, coyotes in urban areas
As foxes and coyotes adapt to urban landscapes, the potential for encounters with humans necessarily goes up. (2019-06-04)
High blood pressure during pregnancy increases risk of heart attacks and strokes
Women who have high blood pressure during their pregnancies, or a related more severe condition called pre-eclampsia, are at much higher risk of heart attacks and strokes than those who have normal blood pressure, according to new research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and presented at the British Cardiovascular Society Conference today in Manchester. (2019-06-04)
'Cannibalism' is a double-whammy for cell health
University of Sydney mathematician Hugh Ford has developed a model tested by experiment that shows cell cannibalism is an important driver in the build-up of cholesterol and other harmful materials. (2019-06-04)
Native Hawaiians at far greater risk for pancreatic cancer
Native Hawaiians are at highest risk for pancreatic cancer, according to a USC study that provides a surprising look at disparities surrounding the deadly disease. (2019-06-03)
Remote sensing of toxic algal blooms
Algal blooms in the Red Sea can be detected with a new method that accounts for dust storms and aerosols. (2019-06-03)
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