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Current Red blood cells News and Events, Red blood cells News Articles.
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California's crashing kelp forest
First the sea stars wasted to nothing. Then purple urchins took over, eating and eating until the bull kelp forests were gone. (2019-10-21)
Women with anemia twice as likely to need transfusion after cesarean delivery
Pregnant women with anemia are twice as likely to need blood transfusions after a cesarean delivery, as those without the condition, according to a study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting. (2019-10-21)
Immune reaction causes malaria organ damage
Immune cells can be the body's defenders and foes at the same time (2019-10-21)
Repurposing heart drugs to target cancer cells
This study has highlighted a novel senolytic drug - drug that eliminates senescent cells -- that are currently being used to treat heart conditions that could be repurposed to target cancer cells, and a range of other conditions. (2019-10-21)
Protein in blood protects against neuronal damage after brain hemorrhage
Patients who survive a cerebral hemorrhage may suffer delayed severe brain damage caused by free hemoglobin, which comes from red blood cells and damages neurons. (2019-10-21)
A compound effective to chemotherapy-resistant cancer cells identified
A compound effective in killing chemotherapy-resistant glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) has been identified, raising hopes of producing drugs capable of eradicating refractory tumors with low toxicity. (2019-10-18)
UK veterinary profession simply not ready for 'no deal' Brexit
The UK veterinary profession is simply not prepared for a 'No Deal' Brexit, warns the editor of Vet Record. (2019-10-18)
Study: First evidence of immune response targeting brain cells in autism
Post-mortem analysis of brains of people with autism revealed cellular features not previously linked to autism. (2019-10-17)
When added to gene therapy, plant-based compound may enable faster, more effective treatments
Today's standard process for administering gene therapy is expensive and time-consuming--a result of the many steps required to deliver the healthy genes into the patients' blood stem cells to correct a genetic problem. (2019-10-17)
The Lancet Haematology: First global estimates suggest around 100 million more blood units are needed in countries with low supplies each year
In the first analysis to estimate the gap between global supply and demand of blood, scientists have found that many countries are critically short of blood, according to a modelling study published in The Lancet Haematology journal. (2019-10-17)
Surveying solar storms by ancient assyrian astronomers
University of Tsukuba researcher finds evidence of ancient solar magnetic storms based on cuneiform astrological records and carbon-14 dating. (2019-10-16)
RUDN University veterinarians developed a way to protect carp from the harmful effects of ammonia
Veterinarians from RUDN University have developed a way to increase the resistance of carp, the most common fish in fish farms, to the harmful effects of ammonia, which is found in almost all water bodies. (2019-10-15)
Cell family trees tracked to discover their role in tissue scarring and liver disease
Researchers have discovered that a key cell type involved in liver injury and cancer consists of two cellular families with different origins and functions. (2019-10-15)
Drug-light combo could offer control over CAR T-cell therapy
UC San Diego bioengineers are a step closer to making CAR T-cell therapy safer, more precise and easy to control. (2019-10-15)
Glowing particles in the blood may help diagnose and monitor brain cancer
A chemical that has improved surgeries for brain cancer by making tumor cells fluorescent may also help doctors safely diagnose the disease and monitor its response to treatment. (2019-10-15)
Resurrection of 50,000-year-old gene reveals how malaria jumped from gorillas to humans
For the first time, scientists have uncovered the likely series of events that led to the world's deadliest malaria parasite being able to jump from gorillas to humans. (2019-10-15)
Overcoming the blood-brain-barrier: Delivering therapeutics to the brain
For the first time, scientists have identified a simple way that can effectively transport medication into the brain - which could lead to improved treatments for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. (2019-10-11)
Viagra shows promise for use in bone marrow transplants
Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have demonstrated a new, rapid method to obtain donor stem cells for bone marrow transplants using a combination of Viagra and a second drug called Plerixafor. (2019-10-10)
AI-based cytometer detects rare cells in blood using magnetic modulation and deep learning
Researchers at UCLA Samueli School of Engineering, led by Prof. (2019-10-10)
When blood vessels are overly permeable
In Germany alone there are around 400,000 patients who suffer from chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. (2019-10-09)
First cell map of developing human liver reveals how blood and immune system develops
In a world first, scientists have created the human developmental liver cell atlas that provides crucial insights into how the blood and immune systems develop in the fetus. (2019-10-09)
Fresh insights could lead to new treatments for liver disease
The fight against liver disease could be helped by the discovery of cells that cause liver scarring. (2019-10-09)
Surprise finding about HIV reservoir could lead to better therapies
HIV antiretroviral (ART) meds cannot completely eradicate the virus; it persists in reservoirs inside immune cells. (2019-10-09)
Atopic dermatitis: How allergens get on our nerves
Atopic dermatitis, or eczema, primarily affects infants and children. A skin disease characterized by flare-ups, it is often treated with topical anti-inflammatories. (2019-10-07)
From sleeping cell to assassin -- how immune cells work
Scientists at the University of Dundee have carried out one of the most comprehensive studies into how immune cells sense and respond to their environment to fight infection and destroy tumours. (2019-10-07)
E-cigarette smoke caused lung cancer in mice
Exposure to electronic-cigarette (E-cig) smoke caused mice to develop lung cancer, a new study finds. (2019-10-07)
Treatment for 'low T' could someday come from a single skin cell, USC research shows
USC researchers have successfully grown human, testosterone-producing cells in the lab, paving the way to someday treat low testosterone with personalized replacement cells. (2019-10-07)
Targeting certain rogue T cells prevents and reverses multiple sclerosis in mice
Multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disorder, is known to be driven by 'helper' T cells, white blood cells that mount an inflammatory attack on the brain and spinal cord. (2019-10-04)
The 'Goldilocks' principle for curing brain cancer
University of Minnesota Medical School researchers found that a stable body temperature holds the key to awakening the body's immune response to fight off brain cancer. (2019-10-04)
Study: Ibrutinib linked to high blood pressure and other heart problems
Over half of people prescribed the targeted blood cancer-fighting drug ibrutinib developed new or worsened high blood pressure within six months of starting the medication, according to a new study published online today in Blood. (2019-10-03)
New method to purify cell types to high purity
Current biology research relies on the ability to purify cell types using antibodies or transgenic constructs. (2019-10-03)
Parkinson's disease is also present in the blood
The behaviour of immune cells in the blood is so different in patients with Parkinson's disease that it advocate for a new type of supplementary medicine, which can regulate the immune system and thus inhibit the deterioration of the brain. (2019-10-03)
Immune cell identity crisis: What makes a liver macrophage a liver macrophage?
UC San Diego researchers investigated how a type of immune cell called a macrophage becomes specialized to the liver. (2019-10-03)
Imprinting on mothers may drive new species formation in poison dart frogs
By rearing frogs with parents -- or foster parents -- of different colors, a team from the University of Pittsburgh working at the Smithsonian in Panama discovered that behavior in response to color may be more important than genetics in the evolution of new species. (2019-10-03)
New fluorescence method reveals signatures of individual microbes
University of Tsukuba researchers have developed a new method that reveals the unique fluorescence patterns produced by individual cells in mixtures of bacteria, yeast and fungi. (2019-10-03)
NIH researchers create new viral vector for improved gene therapy in sickle cell disease
Researchers at NIH have developed a new and improved viral vector -- a virus-based vehicle that delivers therapeutic genes -- for use in gene therapy for sickle cell disease. (2019-10-02)
Engineered T cells may be harnessed to kill solid tumor cells
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that a form of immunotherapy used to treat the blood cancer leukemia may be effective in treating other kinds of cancer as well. (2019-10-02)
Pioneering red light-activated anti-tumor prodrug reduces side effects
Phorbiplatin, a new anti-cancer prodrug that can be controllably activated by red light was developed by a research team from City University of Hong Kong. (2019-10-02)
Environmental toxins impair immune system over multiple generations
New research shows that maternal exposure to a common and ubiquitous form of industrial pollution can harm the immune system of offspring and that this injury is passed along to subsequent generations, weakening the body's defenses against infections such as the influenza virus. (2019-10-02)
Mutant cells team up to make an even deadlier blood cancer
Two very different mutations have been identified as unexpected partners in crime for causing the blood cancer acute myeloid leukemia (AML). (2019-10-02)
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