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Current Rice News and Events, Rice News Articles.
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KIST uesed eco-friendly composite catalyst and ultrasound to remove pollutants from water
Developed eco-friendly, low-cost, and high-efficiency wastewater processing catalyst made from agricultural byproduct, and High efficiency and removal rate achieved through application of ultrasound stimulation, leading to high expectation for the development of an environmental hormone removal system. (2019-07-19)
UMD releases comprehensive review of the future of CRISPR technology in crops
CRISPR is thought of as 'molecular scissors' used to cut and edit DNA, but Yiping Qi, assistant professor at the University of Maryland, is looking far beyond these applications in his new publication in Nature Plants. (2019-07-15)
Rice device channels heat into light
Rice University engineers use their carbon nanotube films to create a device to recycle waste heat. (2019-07-12)
Moon-forming disk discovered around distant planet
Using Earth's most powerful array of radio telescopes, astronomers have made the first observations of a circumplanetary disk of gas and dust like the one that is believed to have birthed the moons of Jupiter. (2019-07-11)
Researchers can finally modify plant mitochondrial DNA
Researchers in Japan have edited plant mitochondrial DNA for the first time, which could lead to a more secure food supply. (2019-07-08)
What journalism professors are teaching students -- about their futures
A new study from Rice University and Rutgers University finds educators are encouraging aspiring journalists to look for work outside the news business. (2019-06-27)
We need to talk about chloramphenicol -- how does this antibiotic cause damage to eukaryotes?
A group of scientists from Japan -- led by Professor Takashi Kamakura of Tokyo University of Science -- has demonstrated, for the first time, the molecular and cellular basis of the 'adverse' effects of the antibiotic chloramphenicol on eukaryotic cells. (2019-06-26)
Cereal grains scientists fight hidden hunger with new approach
Global demand for staple crops like maize, wheat, and rice is on the rise -- making these crops ideal targets for improving nutrition through biofortification. (2019-06-20)
Directed evolution comes to plants
Accelerating plant evolution with CRISPR paves the way for breeders to engineer new crop varieties. (2019-06-19)
Whites' racial prejudice can lessen over time, research shows
Prejudice among white people can lessen over time, according to new research from Rice University. (2019-06-19)
Phage display for engineering blood-contacting surfaces
Surfaces that enable endothelial cell attachment without causing blood clotting are needed for various tissue engineering efforts. (2019-06-19)
'Hot spots' increase efficiency of solar desalination
Rice University researchers showed they could boost the efficiency of their nanotechnology-enabled solar membrane desalination system by more than 50% simply by adding inexpensive plastic lenses to concentrate sunlight into 'hot spots.' (2019-06-18)
Columbia researcher studies how climate change affects crops in India
In a paper published in Environmental Research Letters, Columbia Researcher Kyle Davis found that the yields from grains such as millet, sorghum, and maize are more resilient to extreme weather in India; their yields vary significantly less due to year-to-year changes in climate and generally experience smaller declines during droughts. (2019-06-17)
Researchers take two steps toward green fuel
An international collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT),Japan, has developed a two-step method to more efficiently break down carbohydrates into their single sugar components, a critical process in producing green fuel. (2019-06-14)
A shady spot may protect species against rapid climate warming
A shady refuge on a hot day could be more than a simple comfort in a warming world. (2019-06-14)
Old ice and snow yields tracer of preindustrial ozone
Using rare oxygen molecules trapped in old ice and snow, US and French scientists have answered a long-standing question: How much have 'bad' ozone levels increased since the start of the Industrial Revolution? (2019-06-12)
How bosses react influences whether workers speak up
Speaking up in front of a supervisor can be stressful -- but it doesn't have to be, according to new research from a Rice University psychologist. (2019-06-11)
Direct from distant planet: Spectral clues to puzzling paradox
CI Tau b is a paradoxical planet, but new research about its mass, brightness and the carbon monoxide in its atmosphere is starting to answer questions about how a planet so large could have formed around a star that's only 2 million years old. (2019-06-10)
Antennas of flexible nanotube films an alternative for electronics
Metal-free antennas made of thin, strong, flexible carbon nanotube films are as efficient as common copper antennas, according to Rice University researchers. (2019-06-10)
Sellers on classified ad websites favor buyers from affluent neighborhoods
New Rice University research has found that people selling stuff on classified ad websites prefer dealing with buyers from affluent neighborhoods. (2019-06-10)
Molecular bait can help hydrogels heal wounds
Rice University bioengineers develop modular, injectable hydrogels enhanced by bioactive molecules anchored in the chemical crosslinkers that give the gels structure. (2019-06-05)
Nanomaterial safety on a nano budget
A Rice University laboratory develops and shares a low-cost method to safely handle the transfer of bulk carbon nanotubes and other nanomaterials. (2019-06-03)
New genetic weapons challenge sickle cell disease
Researchers advancing gene-editing techniques to help patients with sickle cell disease discover an unexpected boost in fetal hemoglobin production, which mutes the effect of the disease. (2019-06-03)
Flexible generators turn movement into energy
Rice University researchers produce triboelectric nanogenerators with laser-induced graphene. The flexible devices turn movement into electrical energy and could enable wearable, self-powered sensors and devices. (2019-05-31)
Physicists create stable, strongly magnetized plasma jet in laboratory
A team of scientists has for the first time created a particular form of coherent and magnetized plasma jet that could deepen the understanding of the workings of much larger jets that stream from newborn stars and possibly black holes. (2019-05-31)
Colombia could lose 60% of land suitable for irrigated rice due to climate change
Without significant global reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, Colombia will have 60% less land suitable for rice production by the 2050s. (2019-05-29)
Rice U. lab grows stable, ultrathin magnets
Rice University researchers find a simple method to make unique, nearly two-dimensional iron oxides with stable magnetic properties at room temperature. (2019-05-24)
A 'crisper' method for gene editing in fungi
A team of researchers from Tokyo University of Science, Meiji University, and Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, led by Professor Takayuki Arazoe, has recently established a series of novel strategies to increase the efficiency of targeted gene disruption and new gene 'introduction' using the CRISPR/Cas9 system in the rice blast fungus Pyricularia (Magnaporthe) oryzae. (2019-05-23)
Home-schoolers see no added health risks over time
Years of home-schooling don't appear to influence the general health of children, according to a Rice University study. (2019-05-23)
Synthetic biologists hack bacterial sensors
Synthetic biologists have hacked bacterial sensing with a plug-and-play system that could be used to mix-and-match tens of thousands of sensory inputs and genetic outputs. (2019-05-20)
Hyperspectral camera captures wealth of data in an instant
Rice University scientists and engineers develop a portable spectrometer able to capture far more data much quicker than other fiber-based systems. (2019-05-20)
Superconductor's magnetic persona unmasked
In the pantheon of unconventional superconductors, iron selenide is a rock star. (2019-05-20)
Free-standing emergency departments in Texas' big cities are not reducing congestion at hospitals
Free-standing emergency departments (EDs) in Texas' largest cities have not alleviated emergency room congestion or improved patient wait times in nearby hospitals, according to a new paper by experts at Rice University. (2019-05-20)
New way to beat the heat in electronics
Rice University researchers combine a polymer nanofiber layer with boron nitride to make a strong, foldable dielectric separator for high-temperature batteries and other applications. (2019-05-16)
Rice blast fungus study sheds new light on virulence mechanisms of plant pathogenic fungi
A group of scientists at Nanjing Agricultural University and Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center examined the fungal cell biology of rice blast fungus pathogenesis and recently published the first systematic and comprehensive report on the molecular mechanism of the actin-binding protein (MoAbp1) that plays a crucial role in the pathogenicity of the fungus. (2019-05-14)
Nipple reconstruction techniques could be improved with 3D scaffolds
Nipple and areola reconstruction is a common breast reconstruction technique, especially for breast cancer patients after mastectomy. (2019-05-13)
Plants and the art of microbial maintenance
How plants use chemicals to sculpt their ecological niche. (2019-05-09)
Vietnam can reduce emissions, save $2.3 billion by 2030 in ag, forestry and land use
Vietnam is one of the fortunate nations that has a suite of untapped options for emissions reductions that, if undertaken, can save the country an estimated $2.3 billion by 2030, substantially decrease emissions while increasing agricultural productivity, and benefit coastal and forest ecosystems. (2019-05-08)
Rice husks can remove microcystin toxins from water
An abundant and inexpensive agricultural byproduct, rice husks have been investigated as a water purification solution in the past. (2019-05-06)
Driving chemical reactions with light
How can chemical reactions be triggered by light, following the example of photosynthesis in nature? (2019-05-06)
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