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Current Rna News and Events

Current Rna News and Events, Rna News Articles.
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Sponge-like action of circular RNA aids heart attack recovery, Temple-led team discovers
Circular RNAs, like other noncoding RNAs, were thought to be nonfunctional, but recent evidence suggests otherwise. (2019-09-20)
Cellular hitchhikers may hold a key to understanding ALS
RNA molecules get around nerve cells by hitching a ride on lysosomes. (2019-09-19)
How to construct a protein factory
The complexity of molecular structures in the cell is amazing. (2019-09-19)
ALS gene may be a hitchhiker's guide to the neuron
Researchers discovered that annexin A11, a gene linked to a rare form of ALS, may play a critical role in the transport of important, RNA encoded housekeeping instructions throughout neurons. (2019-09-19)
A Matter of concentration
Researchers are studying how proteins regulate the stem cells of plants. (2019-09-17)
Researchers mix RNA and DNA to study how life's process began billions of years ago
RNA World is a fascinating theory, says Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy, PhD, an associate professor of chemistry at Scripps Research, but it may not hold true. (2019-09-16)
Tiny bubbles in our body could fight cancer better than chemo
Healthy cells in our body release nano-sized bubbles that transfer genetic material such as DNA and RNA to other cells. (2019-09-13)
Gene editing tool gets sharpened by WFIRM team
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine scientists have fine-tuned their delivery system to deliver a DNA editing tool to alter DNA sequences and modify gene function. (2019-09-13)
New way to target cancer's diversity and evolution
Scientists have revealed close-up details of a vital molecule involved in the mix and match of genetic information within cells -- opening up the potential to target proteins of this family to combat cancer's diversity and evolution. (2019-09-13)
New cardiac fibrosis study identifies key proteins that translate into heart disease
The formation of excess fibrous tissue in the heart, which underlies several heart diseases, could be prevented by inhibiting specific proteins that bind to RNA while its code is being translated. (2019-09-12)
The genetics of cancer
A research team has identified a new circular RNA (ribonucleic acid) that increases tumor activity in soft tissue and connective tissue tumors. (2019-09-12)
Scientists discover hidden differences among cells that may help them evade drug therapy
University of Maryland researchers have discovered that seemingly identical cells can use different protein molecules to carry out the same function in an important cellular process. (2019-09-10)
Nobel Laureate, Tom Cech, Ph.D., suggests new way to target third most common oncogene, TERT
Study in PNAS shows that trapping TERT mRNA in the cell nucleus may keep TERT oncogene from being manufactured, silencing the action of TERT in driving cancer. (2019-09-10)
Black sheep: Why some strains of the Epstein Barr virus cause cancer
The Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is very widespread. More than 90 percent of the world's population is infected -- with very different consequences. (2019-09-09)
How do we get so many different types of neurons in our brain?
SMU (Southern Methodist University) researchers have discovered another layer of complexity in gene expression, which could help explain how we're able to have so many billions of neurons in our brain. (2019-09-06)
Discovered a molecule that regulates the development of cancer in a variety of tumors
Researchers from the Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute (IJC), discover that a non-coding region of the genome originates a key molecule for the proliferation of tumors in breast cancer and some types of sarcoma. (2019-09-04)
CU School of Medicine researcher makes key finding related to pre-mRNA splicing
A new study led by scientists from the University of Colorado School of Medicine offers insight into the mechanism of a key cellular process. (2019-09-04)
Methylation of microRNA may be a new powerful biomarker for cancer
Researchers from Osaka University found that levels of methylated microRNA were significantly higher in tissue and serum from cancer patients compared with that from normal controls. (2019-09-02)
Arthritis-causing virus hides in body for months after infection
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a way to fluorescently tag cells infected with chikungunya virus. (2019-08-29)
How chikungunya virus may cause chronic joint pain
A new method for permanently marking cells infected with chikungunya virus could reveal how the virus continues to cause joint pain for months to years after the initial infection, according to a study published Aug. (2019-08-29)
New sequencing study provides insight into HIV vaccine protection
Scientists led by the US Military HIV Research Program (MHRP) identified a transcriptional signature in B cells associated with protection from SIV or HIV infection in five independent trials of HIV-1 vaccine candidates. (2019-08-28)
Yale-led study offers promising approach to reducing plaque in arteries
In a new Yale-led study, investigators have revealed previously unknown factors that contribute to the hardening of arteries and plaque growth, which cause heart disease. (2019-08-26)
Blue light for RNA control
Messenger RNA molecules contain genetic information and thus control the synthesis of proteins in living cells. (2019-08-26)
CRISPR-responsive hydrogel system offers programmable approach to smart biomaterials
Using CRISPR as the 'switcher,' hydrogels infused with DNA can be programmed to translate biological information into changes in the constituent gel material's properties, researchers say, triggering the gels to release compounds or nanoparticles, for example. (2019-08-22)
Scientists probe how distinct liquid organelles in cells are created
One way biological compounds inside cells stay organized is through membrane-less organelles (MLOs) -- wall-less liquid droplets made from proteins and RNA that clump together and stay separate from the rest of the cellular stew. (2019-08-21)
From the tiny testes of flies, new insight into how genes arise
A common birthplace of new genes, the male testes are a hotspot for biological innovation. (2019-08-16)
Revolutionizing the CRISPR method
Researchers at ETH Zurich have refined the famous CRISPR-Cas method. (2019-08-14)
First cells may have emerged because building blocks of proteins stabilized membranes
Scientists have discovered that the building blocks of proteins can stabilize cell membranes. (2019-08-12)
Lupus antibody target identified
Researchers have identified a specific target of antibodies that are implicated in the neuropsychiatric symptoms of lupus, according to human research published in JNeurosci. (2019-08-12)
A novel method to characterize genes with high-precision in single cells
At Helmholtz Zentrum München, a method of targeted RNA sequencing (transcriptome analysis) has now been developed, which precisely detects the smallest amounts of gene transcripts in single cells. (2019-08-12)
New test enhances ability to predict risk of developing cervical cancer in HPV-positive women
Ninety-nine percent of cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). (2019-08-12)
Smuggling route for cells protects DNA from parasites
An international research team has now uncovered new insight into how safety mechanisms keep genetic parasites in check so that they do not damage the genome. (2019-08-09)
Single-cell sequencing reveals glioblastoma's shape-shifting nature
Glioblastoma, a cancer that arises in the brain's supporting glial cells, is one of the worst diagnoses a child can receive. (2019-08-09)
Entropy explains RNA diffusion rates in cells
Small-scale analysis of RNA diffusion rates throughout cells of yeast and bacteria reveals that rates of change of entropy in certain time intervals are larger in areas with higher diffusion rates, according to research published in EPJ B. (2019-08-07)
New blood test can detect rejection by antibodies after kidney transplant
A group of European scientists led by KU Leuven has found a biomarker that can identify patients with symptoms of kidney rejection symptoms after a transplant as a result of antibodies. (2019-08-01)
Uncovering secrets of bone marrow cells and how they differentiate
Researchers mapped distinct bone marrow niche populations and their differentiation paths for the bone marrow factory that starts from mesenchymal stromal cells and ends with three types of cells -- fat cells, bone-making cells and cartilage-making cells. (2019-07-31)
Gene transcripts from ancient wolf analyzed after 14,000 years in permafrost
RNA -- the short-lived transcripts of genes -- from the 'Tumat puppy', a wolf of the Pleistocene era has been isolated, and its sequence analyzed in a new study by Oliver Smith of the University of Copenhagen and colleagues publishing on July 30 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology. (2019-07-30)
UVA discovers incredible HULLK that controls prostate cancer progression
Researchers believe the discovery could be used to target and stop the progression of a cancer that kills more than 30,000 American men every year. (2019-07-29)
Like film editors and archaeologists, biochemists piece together genome history
UC San Diego biochemists discovered a large-scale molecular movement associated with RNA catalysis that provides evidence for the origin of RNA splicing and its role in the diversity of life on Earth. (2019-07-26)
HDO-antimiR represents a new weapon in the fight against microRNA-related disease
Malfunctioning microRNA (miRNA) has been implicated in various genetic diseases. (2019-07-26)
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