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Current Robot News and Events

Current Robot News and Events, Robot News Articles.
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Trash talk hurts, even when it comes from a robot
Trash talking has a long and colorful history of flustering game opponents, and now researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have demonstrated that discouraging words can be perturbing even when uttered by a robot. (2019-11-19)
Multimaterial 3D printing manufactures complex objects, fast
3D printing is super cool, but it's also super slow -- it would take 115 days to print a detailed, multimaterial object about the size of a grapefruit. (2019-11-13)
A 'worker' that flies: Chinese researchers design novel flying robot
Recently, Chinese researchers at the Shenyang Institute of Automation (SIA) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the development of a contact aerial manipulator system that shows high flexibility and strong mission adaptability. (2019-11-08)
Flexible yet sturdy robot is designed to 'grow' like a plant
MIT engineers have developed a robot designed to extend a chain-like appendage flexible enough to twist and turn in any necessary configuration, yet rigid enough to support heavy loads or apply torque to assemble parts in tight spaces. (2019-11-07)
Showing robots 'tough love' helps them succeed, finds new USC study
According to a new study by USC computer scientists, to help a robot succeed, you might need to show it some tough love. (2019-11-06)
Learning from mistakes and transferable skills -- the attributes for a worker robot
Practice makes perfect -- it is an adage that has helped humans become highly dexterous and now it is an approach that is being applied to robots. (2019-11-04)
Technique helps robots find the front door
MIT engineers have developed a navigation method that doesn't require mapping an area in advance. (2019-11-04)
Human reflexes keep two-legged robot upright
Imagine being trapped inside a collapsed building after a disaster, wondering if anybody will be brave enough to rescue you. (2019-10-30)
Enabling autonomous vehicles to see around corners
To improve the safety of autonomous systems, MIT engineers have developed a system that can sense tiny changes in shadows on the ground to determine if there's a moving object coming around the corner. (2019-10-28)
Expecting the unexpected: A new model for cognition
Researchers in the Cognitive Neurorobotics Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have developed a computer model inspired by known biological brain mechanisms, modeling how the brain learns and recognizes new information and then makes predictions about incoming sensory inputs. (2019-10-23)
Robots can learn how to support teachers in class sessions
New research conducted at the University of Plymouth shows that a robot can be programmed to progressively learn autonomous behaviour from human demonstrations and guidance. (2019-10-23)
Pushy robots learn the fundamentals of object manipulation
MIT researchers have compiled a dataset that captures the detailed behavior of a robotic system physically pushing hundreds of different objects. (2019-10-22)
Giving robots a faster grasp
MIT engineers have found a way to significantly speed up the planning process required for a robot to adjust its grasp on an object by pushing that object against a stationary surface. (2019-10-17)
Darn you, R2! When can we blame robots?
A recent study finds that people are likely to blame robots for workplace accidents, but only if they believe the robots are autonomous. (2019-10-17)
Assembler robots make large structures from little pieces
Systems of tiny robots may someday build high-performance structures, from airplanes to space settlements. (2019-10-16)
These new soft actuators could make soft robots less bulky
Engineers at the University of California have developed a way to build soft robots that are compact, portable and multifunctional. (2019-10-11)
Biologically-inspired skin improves robots' sensory abilities
Sensitive synthetic skin enables robots to sense their own bodies and surroundings - a crucial capability if they are to be in close contact with people. (2019-10-10)
Soft robot programmed to move like an inchworm
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have created a miniature robot that can crawl with inchworm-like motion. (2019-10-07)
When it comes to robots, reliability may matter more than reasoning
What does it take for a human to trust a robot? (2019-09-23)
UVA engineering-led team unveils 'Tunabot,' first robotic fish to keep pace with a tuna
Mechanical engineers at the University of Virginia School of Engineering, leading a collaboration with biologists from Harvard University, have created the first robotic fish proven to mimic the speed and movements of live yellowfin tuna. (2019-09-18)
Shape-shifting robots built from smarticles could navigate Army operations
A US Army project took a new approach to developing robots -- researchers built robots entirely from smaller robots known as smarticles, unlocking the principles of a potentially new locomotion technique. (2019-09-18)
Look out, invasive species: The robots are coming
Researchers published the first experiments to gauge whether biomimetic robotic fish can induce fear-related changes in mosquitofish, aiming to discover whether the highly invasive species might be controlled without toxicants or trapping methods harmful to wildlife. (2019-09-16)
A robot with a firm yet gentle grasp
Human hands are skilled at manipulating a range of objects. (2019-09-12)
Discovering biological mechanisms enabling pianists to achieve skillful fingering
Japanese researchers discovered a sensorimotor function integration mechanism that enables the skillful fingering of pianists. (2019-09-11)
'Flying fish' robot can propel itself out of water and glide through the air
A bio-inspired bot uses water from the environment to create a gas and launch itself from the water's surface. (2019-09-11)
Realistic robots get under Galápagos lizards' skin
Male lava lizards are sensitive to the timing of their opponents' responses during contest displays, with quicker responses being perceived as more aggressive, a study in Behavioural Ecology and Sociobiology suggests. (2019-09-04)
Robotic thread is designed to slip through the brain's blood vessels
MIT engineers have developed a magnetically steerable, thread-like robot that can actively glide through narrow, winding pathways, such as the labrynthine vasculature of the brain. (2019-08-28)
Researchers use machine learning to teach robots how to trek through unknown terrains
A team of Australian researchers has designed a reliable strategy for testing physical abilities of humanoid robots. (2019-08-23)
Scurrying roaches help researchers steady staggering robots
To walk or run with finesse, roaches and robots coordinate leg movements via signals sent through centralized systems. (2019-08-22)
Software for diagnostics and fail-safe operation of robots developed at FEFU
A team of scientists from School of Engineering at Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Institute of Automation and Control Processes, and Institute of Marine Technology Problems of the Far Eastern Department of the Russian Academy of Sciences developed a software module to automatically diagnose defects in sensors and electric drives in various kinds of robots. (2019-08-22)
Self-folding 'Rollbot' paves the way for fully untethered soft robots
The majority of soft robots today rely on external power and control, keeping them tethered to off-board systems or rigged with hard components. (2019-08-21)
How ergonomic is your warehouse job? Soon, an app might be able to tell you
Researchers at the UW have used machine learning to develop a new system that can monitor factory and warehouse workers and tell them how ergonomic their jobs are in real time. (2019-08-19)
No, Siri and Alexa are not making us ruder
Is the way we bark out orders to digital assistants like Siri, Alexa and Google Assistant making us less polite? (2019-08-15)
UNH technology helps map the way to solve mystery of pilot Amelia Earhart
Researchers from the University of New Hampshire's Marine School are part of the crew, led by National Geographic Explorer-at-Large Robert Ballard, that is setting out to find answers to disappearance of famed pilot Amelia Earhart. (2019-08-14)
Robots need a new philosophy to get a grip
Robots need to know the reason why they are doing a job if they are to effectively and safely work alongside people in the near future. (2019-08-12)
Employees less upset at being replaced by robots than by other people
Generally speaking, most people find the idea of workers being replaced by robots or software worse than if the jobs are taken over by other workers. (2019-08-09)
Technique uses magnets, light to control and reconfigure soft robots
Researchers have developed a technique that allows them to remotely control the movement of soft robots, lock them into position for as long as needed and later reconfigure the robots into new shapes. (2019-08-02)
Agile untethered fully soft robots in liquid
To free the potential of soft robots in new applications, untethered design is of great importance but still challenging. (2019-08-02)
'Voltron' imaging tool captures brain cell action in living animals
Janelia scientists have developed a new way to track neural activity. (2019-08-01)
You can't squash this roach-inspired robot
A new insect-sized robot created by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, can scurry across the floor at nearly the speed of a darting cockroach -- and it's nearly as hardy as a cockroach, too: Try to squash this robot under your foot, and more than likely, it will just keep going. (2019-07-31)
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