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Current Robots News and Events, Robots News Articles.
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Understanding research on how people develop trust in AI can inform its use
A new review examined two decades of research on how people develop trust in AI. (2020-04-03)
Robo-turtles in fish farms reduce fish stress
Robotic turtles used for salmon farm surveillance could help prevent fish escapes. (2020-04-02)
AI as mediator: 'Smart' replies help humans communicate during pandemic
Daily life during a pandemic means social distancing and finding new ways to remotely connect with friends, family and co-workers. (2020-03-31)
How robots can help combat COVID-19: Science Robotics editorial
Can robots be effective tools in combating the COVID-19 pandemic? (2020-03-25)
COVID-19 should be wake-up call for robotics research
Robots could perform some of the 'dull, dirty and dangerous' jobs associated with combating the COVID-19 pandemic, but that would require many new capabilities not currently being funded or developed, an editorial in the journal Science Robotics argues. (2020-03-25)
Stanford engineers create shape-changing, free-roaming soft robot
A new type of robot combines traditional and soft robotics, making it safe but sturdy. (2020-03-18)
Soft robot, unplugged
It's balloon art on steroids: a pneumatic, shape-changing soft robot capable of navigating its environment without requiring a tether to a stationary power source. (2020-03-18)
Robots popular with older adults
A new study by psychologists from the University of Jena (Germany) does not confirm that robot skepticism among elder people is often suspected in science. (2020-03-12)
Crosstalk captured between muscles, neural networks in biohybrid machines
A platform designed for coculturing a neurosphere and muscle cells allows scientists to capture the growth of neurons toward muscles to form neuromuscular junctions. (2020-03-10)
Showing robots how to do your chores
By observing humans, robots learn to perform complex tasks, such as setting a table. (2020-03-06)
Fighting hand tremors: First comes AI, then robots
Robots hold promise for a large number of people with neurological movement disorders severely affecting the quality of their lives. (2020-03-04)
Novel use of robotics for neuroendovascular procedures
The advanced technology has the potential to change acute stroke treatment. (2020-03-02)
Socially assistive robot helps children with autism learn
Researchers at USC's Department of Computer Science have developed personalized learning robots for children with autism. (2020-02-27)
UCLA engineers develop miniaturized 'warehouse robots' for biotechnology applications
UCLA engineers have developed minuscule warehouse logistics robots that could help expedite and automate medical diagnostic technologies and other applications that move and manipulate tiny drops of fluid. (2020-02-26)
Soft robot fingers gently grasp deep-sea jellyfish
Marine biologists have adopted ''soft robotic linguine fingers'' as tools to conduct their undersea research. (2020-02-24)
Swarming robots avoid collisions, traffic jams
Researchers have developed the first decentralized algorithm with a collision-free, deadlock-free guarantee and validated it on a swarm of 100 autonomous robots in the lab. (2020-02-24)
'Flapping wings' powered by the sun (video)
In ancient Greek mythology, Icarus' wax wings melted when he dared to fly too close to the sun. (2020-02-19)
Getting a grip: An innovative mechanical controller design for robot-assisted surgery
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology designed a new type of controller for the robotic arm used in robotic surgery. (2020-02-18)
Slithering snakes on a 2D plane
Snakes live in diverse environments ranging from unbearably hot deserts to lush tropical forests, where they slither up trees, rocks and shrubbery every day. (2020-02-18)
Factories reimagined
Factories in the future will definitely look different than today. (2020-02-15)
Oceans: particle fragmentation plays a major role in carbon sequestration
A French-British team has just discovered that a little known process regulates the capacity of oceans to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2). (2020-02-13)
The use of jargon kills people's interest in science, politics
When scientists and others use their specialized jargon terms while communicating with the general public, the effects are much worse than just making what they're saying hard to understand. (2020-02-12)
Are robots designed to include the LGBTQ+ community?
Robot technology is flourishing in multiple sectors of society, including the retail, health care, industry and education sectors. (2020-02-12)
Retina-inspired carbon nitride-based photonic synapses for selective detection of UV light
Researchers at Seoul National University and Inha University in South Korea developed photo-sensitive artificial nerves that emulated functions of a retina by using 2-dimensional carbon nitride (C3N4) nanodot materials. (2020-02-04)
Patterns in the brain shed new light on how we function
Patterns of brain connectivity take us a step closer to understanding the key principles of cognition. (2020-01-30)
Robot sweat regulates temperature, key for extreme conditions
Just when it seemed like robots couldn't get any cooler, Cornell University researchers have created a soft robot muscle that can regulate its temperature through sweating. (2020-01-29)
How moon jellyfish get about
With their translucent bells, moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) move around the oceans in a very efficient way. (2020-01-23)
Spider-Man-style robotic graspers defy gravity
Traditional methods of vacuum suction and previous vacuum suction devices cannot maintain suction on rough surfaces due to vacuum leakage, which leads to suction failure. (2020-01-17)
'PigeonBot's' feather-level insights push flying bots closer to mimicking birds
Birds fly in a meticulous manner not yet replicable by human-made machines, though two new studies in Science Robotics and Science -- by uncovering more about what gives birds this unparalleled control -- pave the way to flying robots that can maneuver the air as nimbly as birds. (2020-01-16)
Designing better nursing care with robots
Robots are becoming an increasingly important part of human care, according to researchers based in Japan. (2020-01-15)
Robotic gripping mechanism mimics how sea anemones catch prey
Researchers in China demonstrated a robotic gripping mechanism that mimics how a sea anemone catches its prey. (2020-01-14)
Can sea star movement inspire better robots?
What researchers have learned about how a sea star accomplishes movement synchronization, given that it has no brain and a completely decentralized nervous system, might help us design more efficient robotics systems (2020-01-08)
Ten not-to-be-missed PPPL stories from 2019 -- plus a triple bonus!
Arms control robots, a new national facility, and accelerating the drive to bring the fusion energy that powers the stars to Earth: 10 (and a triple bonus!) Must-Read Stories of 2019. (2020-01-02)
Researchers directly measure 'Cheerios effect' forces for the first time
In a finding that could be useful in designing small aquatic robots, researchers have measured the forces that cause small objects to cluster together on the surface of a liquid -- a phenomenon known as the 'Cheerios effect.' (2019-12-19)
Self-driving microrobots
Most synthetic materials, including those in battery electrodes, polymer membranes, and catalysts, degrade over time because they don't have internal repair mechanisms. (2019-12-10)
Navigating navigating land and water
Centipedes not only walk on land but also swim in water. (2019-12-09)
Liquid crystal polymer learns to move and grab objects
A specially conditioned liquid crystal polymer could be controlled with the power of light alone, with new potential applications in soft robotics. (2019-12-04)
Satellite broken? Smart satellites to the rescue
The University of Cincinnati is developing robotic networks that can work independently but collaboratively on a common task. (2019-11-26)
NUS researchers create new metallic material for flexible soft robots
A team from NUS has created a material that is half as light as paper and highly flexible but also shows enhanced characteristics for electrical conductivity, heat generation, fire-resistance, strain-sensing and is inherently capable of wireless communications. (2019-11-24)
New machine learning algorithms offer safety and fairness guarantees
Writing in Science, Thomas and his colleagues Yuriy Brun, Andrew Barto and graduate student Stephen Giguere at UMass Amherst, Bruno Castro da Silva at the Federal University of Rio Grande del Sol, Brazil, and Emma Brunskill at Stanford University this week introduce a new framework for designing machine learning algorithms that make it easier for users of the algorithm to specify safety and fairness constraints. (2019-11-21)
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