Current Salmon News and Events

Current Salmon News and Events, Salmon News Articles.
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Spring-run and fall-run Chinook salmon aren't as different as they seem
Historically, spring-run and fall-run Chinook salmon have been considered as separate subspecies, races, ecotypes, or even as separate species of fish. A new genetic analysis, however, shows that the timing of migration in Chinook salmon is determined entirely by differences in one short stretch of DNA in their genomes. (2020-10-29)

Simple genetics control timing of chinook salmon migration
The complex migratory traits of northern California's Chinook salmon - which have led some to regard the early- versus late-migrating fish as different species - result from a single, small gene region, researchers report. (2020-10-29)

Smart solution to detect seafood spoilage
Existing methods for detecting seafood spoilage are far from satisfactory for ensuring food safety and security. To solve this problem, Flinders University researchers have constructed and tested a solid-state fluorescent sensor loaded on filter papers that can instantly and accurately measure the rate of spoilage in Atlantic salmon - and can easily be applied to other seafood. (2020-10-28)

Early-arriving endangered Chinook salmon take the brunt of sea lion predation
A new University of Washington and NOAA Fisheries study found that sea lions have the largest negative effect on early-arriving endangered Chinook salmon in the lower Columbia River. The results of this study will publish Oct. 18, 2020 in the Journal of Applied Ecology. (2020-10-19)

Invisible threat: Listeria in smoked fish
Fish should be a regular component of our diets. It is an important source of biologically high-quality and easily digestible protein, minerals and vitamins. However, raw, smoked and cured fish products also often contain pathogenic germs, notably listeria. People can become infected by eating contaminated food and become ill with listeriosis. (2020-10-07)

Alaska's salmon are getting smaller, affecting people and ecosystems
The size of salmon returning to rivers in Alaska has declined dramatically over the past 60 years because they are spending fewer years at sea, scientists report. Salmon are critically important to both people and ecosystems in Alaska, supporting commercial and subsistence fisheries and transporting nutrients from the ocean to inland areas. Smaller salmon provide less food for people who depend on them, less value for commercial fishers, and less fertilizer for terrestrial ecosystems. (2020-08-19)

Subpolar marginal seas play a key role in making the subarctic Pacific nutrient-rich
A group of researchers from three Japanese universities has discovered why the western subarctic Pacific Ocean, which accounts for only 6 percent of the world's oceans, produces an estimated 26 percent of the world's marine resources. (2020-08-07)

Scientists supercharge shellfish to tackle vitamin deficiency in humans
Cambridge scientists have developed a new way to fortify shellfish to tackle human nutrient deficiencies which cause severe health problems across the world. The team is now working with major seafood manufacturers to further test their microencapsulation technology, or ''Vitamin Bullets''. (2020-07-19)

Chinook salmon declines related to changes in freshwater conditions
A new University of Alaska-led study provides the first evidence that declines in many of Alaska's chinook salmon populations can be attributed in part to climate-driven changes in their freshwater habitats. (2020-07-09)

Jellyfish contain no calories, so why do they still attract predators?
New study shows that jellyfish are an important food source for many animals. As jellyfish blooms become more frequent and more massive, this could affect marine ecosystems. (2020-06-24)

Size matters in the sex life of salmon
For Atlantic salmon, size matters when it comes to love. Larger males and females that may spend up to four years at sea produce many more babies, but they are very rare compared to younger fish. (2020-06-23)

You are what you eat is as important for fish as it is for people
There is truth in the saying 'you are what you eat'; even more so if you are a salmon or herring swimming off the British Columbia coast, a recent University of British Columbia study discovered. (2020-06-08)

Great white shark diet surprises scientists
The first-ever detailed analysis of the diet of great white sharks has shown they spend more time feeding at the seafloor than many would have expected. (2020-06-07)

Story tips: Mining for COVID, rules to grow by and the 3D connection
ORNL story Tips: Mining for COVID, rules to grow by and the 3D connection. (2020-05-18)

What does drought mean for endangered California salmon?
Droughts threatens California's endangered salmon population -- but pools that serve as drought refuges could make the difference between life and death for these vulnerable fish. (2020-05-18)

Fishing can disrupt mating systems
In many fish species body size plays an important role in sexual selection. Large individuals are preferred mating partners because they can enhance offspring survival by providing better quality resources than small individuals. While large females and males are often favored by sexual selection, fishing targets and removes these reproductively superior individuals. Academy Research Fellow Silva Uusi-Heikkilä discusses in her recent literature review the implications fisheries selection might have on sexual selection, individual reproductive success and population viability. (2020-05-08)

Magnetic pulses alter salmon's orientation, suggesting navigation via magnetite in tissue
Researchers have taken a step closer to solving one of nature's most remarkable mysteries: How do salmon, when it's time to spawn, find their way back from distant ocean locations to the stream where they hatched? (2020-05-02)

Return of 'the Blob' could intensify climate change impacts on Northeast Pacific fisheries
A large marine heatwave would double the rate of the climate change impacts on fisheries species in the northeast Pacific by 2050, says a recently released study by researchers from the University of British Columbia and University of Bern. (2020-04-21)

KIST and UNIST joint research team develop a high-capacity battery material using salmon DNA
A Korean research team has succeeded in developing next-generation high-capacity cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. The Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) announced that the joint research team of Dr. Kyung Yoon Chung(at KIST), Prof. Sang-Young Lee(at the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)), and Dr. Wonyoung Chang (at KIST) have developed high-performance cathode material by stabilizing the surface of over-lithiated layered oxides(OLO), using the DNA of salmon. (2020-04-17)

Biorobotics is the future of fish farming
Several hundred thousand salmon swim closely together in fish farms. For at least some time, the fish farmer and the fish have the same goal: to keep the fish healthy, eating and growing. Therefore it is necessary to provide fish with environmental conditions, where the stress level is low, parasites do not pose a risk to their health and there is enough food. Stressed and sick fish do not eat or grow or bring profit to the fish farmer. (2020-04-16)

Some worms programmed to die early for sake of colony
Some worms are genetically predisposed to die before reaching old age, which appears to benefit the colony by reducing food demand, finds a new UCL-led study published in Aging Cell. (2020-04-16)

Robo-turtles in fish farms reduce fish stress
Robotic turtles used for salmon farm surveillance could help prevent fish escapes. The 'turtle robots' are the first steps in a technology that improves the monitoring of sea cages. (2020-04-02)

Salmon provide nutrients to Alaskan streambanks
Nutrient cycling of stream ecosystems dependent on portion of salmons' lifecycle. (2020-03-18)

For migratory alewife, urbanization of coastal areas means smaller size, poorer health
A Marine Biological Laboratory study of migratory herring (alewife) in Massachusetts and Maine finds that fish leaving urbanized coastal environments are smaller and less healthy than fish leaving less developed watersheds. (2020-03-13)

Melting glaciers will challenge some salmon populations and benefit others
A new Simon Fraser University-led study looking at the effects that glacier retreat will have on western North American Pacific salmon predicts that while some salmon populations may struggle, others may benefit. (2020-03-11)

World-first system forecasts warming of lakes globally
Pioneering research led by the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH) has devised the first system that classifies lakes globally, placing each of them in one of nine 'thermal regions.' This will enable scientists to better predict future warming of the world's lakes due to climate change, and the potential threat to cold-water species such as salmon and trout. (2020-03-06)

Re-thinking 'tipping points' in ecosystems and beyond
Abrupt environmental changes, known as regime shifts, are the subject of new research in which shows how small environmental changes trigger slow evolutionary processes that eventually precipitate collapse. (2020-03-02)

Study reveals hidden risks of estuary development for young salmon
A Simon Fraser University-led research team has found significant evidence that human activity in estuaries is impacting juvenile Pacific and Atlantic salmon. The team's review of 167 peer-reviewed studies identified negative impacts from several stressors, including the effects of flood-protecting tidal gates, pollution and habitat modification. (2020-02-20)

Alaska's national forests contribute 48 million salmon a year to state's fishing industry
Alaska's Tongass and Chugach National Forests, which contain some of the world's largest remaining tracts of intact temperate rainforest, contribute an average of 48 million salmon a year to the state's commercial fishing industry, a new USDA Forest Service-led study has found. The average value of these ''forest fish'' when they are brought back to the dock is estimated at $88 million per year. (2020-02-06)

What's in Puget sound? New technique casts a wide net for concerning chemicals
Using a new 'non-targeted' approach, UW and UW Tacoma researchers screened samples from multiple regions of Puget Sound to look for potentially harmful compounds that might be present. (2020-01-22)

NASA-NOAA satellite catches Tropical Cyclone Blake and western Australia fires
Tropical cyclone Blake made landfall in the Kimberley coast of Western Australia and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an image that showed its center inland with the storm extending to the southern part of the state where fires raged. (2020-01-08)

NUS researchers uncover how fish get their shape
NUS Mechanobiology Institute researchers investigated the science behind the formation of the 'V' patterns -- also known as chevron patterns -- in the swimming muscles of fish. The study focused on the myotome (a group of muscles served by a spinal nerve root) that makes up most of the fish body. The research team found that these patterns do not simply arise from genetic instruction or biochemical pathways but actually require physical forces to correctly develop. (2019-12-22)

Easy prey: The largest bears in the world use small streams to fatten up on salmon
A new study reveals a different picture of how and when brown bears in southwestern Alaska eat salmon. Most of these bears, also known as grizzlies, are dipping into small streams to capture their iconic prey. (2019-12-19)

Tiny shells reveal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean
In first-of-its-kind research, NOAA scientists and academic partners used 100 years of microscopic shells to show that the coastal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean average -- with the seafood supply in the crosshairs. (2019-12-16)

Salmon lose diversity in managed rivers, reducing resilience to environmental change
The manipulation of rivers in California is jeopardizing the resilience of native Chinook salmon. It compresses their migration timing to the point that they crowd their habitats. They may miss the best window for entering the ocean and growing into adults, new research shows. (2019-12-13)

Killer whale grandmothers boost survival of calves
The study found that grandmothers who were no longer able to reproduce had the biggest beneficial impact on the survival chances of their grand-offspring. This may be because grandmothers without calves of their own are free to focus time and resources on the latest generation, the researchers suggest. (2019-12-09)

Fish size affects snake river salmon returns more than route through dams
The survival and eventual return of juvenile Snake River salmon and steelhead to spawning streams as adults depends more on their size than the way they pass through hydroelectric dams on their migration to the ocean, new research shows. (2019-11-25)

Bigger doesn't mean better for hatchery-released salmon
A recent study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecosphere examines hatchery practices in regards to how Chinook salmon hatcheries in the PNW are affecting wild populations over the past decades. (2019-11-14)

Cats of the sea offer insights into territorial behavior of wild fishes
Researchers carrying out regular monitoring of a Marine Protected Area off the UK coastline noticed species of wrasse demonstrating almost cat-like behaviour as they chased lasers shone onto the seabed. (2019-11-12)

Fish oil supplements have no effect on anxiety and depression
Omega-3 fats have little or no effect on anxiety and depression according to new research. Increased consumption of omega-3 fats is widely promoted globally because of a common belief that it will protect against, or even reverse, conditions such as anxiety and depression. But a systematic review published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, finds that omega-3 supplements offer no benefit. (2019-11-04)

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