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Current Salmon News and Events

Current Salmon News and Events, Salmon News Articles.
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Subpolar marginal seas play a key role in making the subarctic Pacific nutrient-rich
A group of researchers from three Japanese universities has discovered why the western subarctic Pacific Ocean, which accounts for only 6 percent of the world's oceans, produces an estimated 26 percent of the world's marine resources. (2020-08-07)
Scientists supercharge shellfish to tackle vitamin deficiency in humans
Cambridge scientists have developed a new way to fortify shellfish to tackle human nutrient deficiencies which cause severe health problems across the world. (2020-07-19)
Chinook salmon declines related to changes in freshwater conditions
A new University of Alaska-led study provides the first evidence that declines in many of Alaska's chinook salmon populations can be attributed in part to climate-driven changes in their freshwater habitats. (2020-07-09)
Jellyfish contain no calories, so why do they still attract predators?
New study shows that jellyfish are an important food source for many animals. (2020-06-24)
Size matters in the sex life of salmon
For Atlantic salmon, size matters when it comes to love. (2020-06-23)
You are what you eat is as important for fish as it is for people
There is truth in the saying 'you are what you eat'; even more so if you are a salmon or herring swimming off the British Columbia coast, a recent University of British Columbia study discovered. (2020-06-08)
Great white shark diet surprises scientists
The first-ever detailed analysis of the diet of great white sharks has shown they spend more time feeding at the seafloor than many would have expected. (2020-06-07)
Story tips: Mining for COVID, rules to grow by and the 3D connection
ORNL story Tips: Mining for COVID, rules to grow by and the 3D connection. (2020-05-18)
What does drought mean for endangered California salmon?
Droughts threatens California's endangered salmon population -- but pools that serve as drought refuges could make the difference between life and death for these vulnerable fish. (2020-05-18)
Fishing can disrupt mating systems
In many fish species body size plays an important role in sexual selection. (2020-05-08)
Magnetic pulses alter salmon's orientation, suggesting navigation via magnetite in tissue
Researchers have taken a step closer to solving one of nature's most remarkable mysteries: How do salmon, when it's time to spawn, find their way back from distant ocean locations to the stream where they hatched? (2020-05-02)
Return of 'the Blob' could intensify climate change impacts on Northeast Pacific fisheries
A large marine heatwave would double the rate of the climate change impacts on fisheries species in the northeast Pacific by 2050, says a recently released study by researchers from the University of British Columbia and University of Bern. (2020-04-21)
KIST and UNIST joint research team develop a high-capacity battery material using salmon DNA
A Korean research team has succeeded in developing next-generation high-capacity cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. (2020-04-17)
Biorobotics is the future of fish farming
Several hundred thousand salmon swim closely together in fish farms. (2020-04-16)
Some worms programmed to die early for sake of colony
Some worms are genetically predisposed to die before reaching old age, which appears to benefit the colony by reducing food demand, finds a new UCL-led study published in Aging Cell. (2020-04-16)
Robo-turtles in fish farms reduce fish stress
Robotic turtles used for salmon farm surveillance could help prevent fish escapes. (2020-04-02)
Salmon provide nutrients to Alaskan streambanks
Nutrient cycling of stream ecosystems dependent on portion of salmons' lifecycle. (2020-03-18)
For migratory alewife, urbanization of coastal areas means smaller size, poorer health
A Marine Biological Laboratory study of migratory herring (alewife) in Massachusetts and Maine finds that fish leaving urbanized coastal environments are smaller and less healthy than fish leaving less developed watersheds. (2020-03-13)
Melting glaciers will challenge some salmon populations and benefit others
A new Simon Fraser University-led study looking at the effects that glacier retreat will have on western North American Pacific salmon predicts that while some salmon populations may struggle, others may benefit. (2020-03-11)
World-first system forecasts warming of lakes globally
Pioneering research led by the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH) has devised the first system that classifies lakes globally, placing each of them in one of nine 'thermal regions.' This will enable scientists to better predict future warming of the world's lakes due to climate change, and the potential threat to cold-water species such as salmon and trout. (2020-03-06)
Re-thinking 'tipping points' in ecosystems and beyond
Abrupt environmental changes, known as regime shifts, are the subject of new research in which shows how small environmental changes trigger slow evolutionary processes that eventually precipitate collapse. (2020-03-02)
Study reveals hidden risks of estuary development for young salmon
A Simon Fraser University-led research team has found significant evidence that human activity in estuaries is impacting juvenile Pacific and Atlantic salmon. (2020-02-20)
Alaska's national forests contribute 48 million salmon a year to state's fishing industry
Alaska's Tongass and Chugach National Forests, which contain some of the world's largest remaining tracts of intact temperate rainforest, contribute an average of 48 million salmon a year to the state's commercial fishing industry, a new USDA Forest Service-led study has found. (2020-02-06)
What's in Puget sound? New technique casts a wide net for concerning chemicals
Using a new 'non-targeted' approach, UW and UW Tacoma researchers screened samples from multiple regions of Puget Sound to look for potentially harmful compounds that might be present. (2020-01-22)
NASA-NOAA satellite catches Tropical Cyclone Blake and western Australia fires
Tropical cyclone Blake made landfall in the Kimberley coast of Western Australia and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an image that showed its center inland with the storm extending to the southern part of the state where fires raged. (2020-01-08)
NUS researchers uncover how fish get their shape
NUS Mechanobiology Institute researchers investigated the science behind the formation of the 'V' patterns -- also known as chevron patterns -- in the swimming muscles of fish. (2019-12-22)
Easy prey: The largest bears in the world use small streams to fatten up on salmon
A new study reveals a different picture of how and when brown bears in southwestern Alaska eat salmon. (2019-12-19)
Tiny shells reveal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean
In first-of-its-kind research, NOAA scientists and academic partners used 100 years of microscopic shells to show that the coastal waters off California are acidifying twice as fast as the global ocean average -- with the seafood supply in the crosshairs. (2019-12-16)
Salmon lose diversity in managed rivers, reducing resilience to environmental change
The manipulation of rivers in California is jeopardizing the resilience of native Chinook salmon. (2019-12-13)
Killer whale grandmothers boost survival of calves
The study found that grandmothers who were no longer able to reproduce had the biggest beneficial impact on the survival chances of their grand-offspring. (2019-12-09)
Fish size affects snake river salmon returns more than route through dams
The survival and eventual return of juvenile Snake River salmon and steelhead to spawning streams as adults depends more on their size than the way they pass through hydroelectric dams on their migration to the ocean, new research shows. (2019-11-25)
Bigger doesn't mean better for hatchery-released salmon
A recent study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecosphere examines hatchery practices in regards to how Chinook salmon hatcheries in the PNW are affecting wild populations over the past decades. (2019-11-14)
Cats of the sea offer insights into territorial behavior of wild fishes
Researchers carrying out regular monitoring of a Marine Protected Area off the UK coastline noticed species of wrasse demonstrating almost cat-like behaviour as they chased lasers shone onto the seabed. (2019-11-12)
Fish oil supplements have no effect on anxiety and depression
Omega-3 fats have little or no effect on anxiety and depression according to new research. (2019-11-04)
Fish simulations provide new insights into energy costs of swimming
A new computational analysis suggests that maximizing swimming speeds while minimizing energy costs depends on an optimal balance between a fish's muscle dynamics and the way its size, shape, and swimming motion affect its movement through water. (2019-10-31)
Study finds safe mercury levels in Kotzebue Sound fish
A new analysis of Kotzebue Sound fish has found that mercury levels in a variety of its subsistence species are safe for unrestricted consumption. (2019-09-27)
Feeding dogs and cats with raw food is not considered a significant source of infections
An extensive international survey conducted at the University of Helsinki indicates that pet owners do not consider raw food to considerably increase infection risk in their household. (2019-09-06)
New viruses discovered in endangered wild Pacific salmon populations
Three new viruses -- including one from a group of viruses never before shown to infect fish -- have been discovered in endangered Chinook and sockeye salmon populations. (2019-09-04)
New artifacts suggest people arrived in North America earlier than previously thought
Stone tools and other artifacts unearthed from an archeological dig at the Cooper's Ferry site in western Idaho suggest that people lived in the area 16,000 years ago, more than a thousand years earlier than scientists previously thought. (2019-08-30)
Scientists use honey and wild salmon to trace industrial metals in the environment
Scientists have combined analyses from honey and salmon to show how lead from natural and industrial sources gets distributed throughout the environment. (2019-08-21)
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