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Current Salmon News and Events

Current Salmon News and Events, Salmon News Articles.
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Bigger doesn't mean better for hatchery-released salmon
A recent study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecosphere examines hatchery practices in regards to how Chinook salmon hatcheries in the PNW are affecting wild populations over the past decades. (2019-11-14)
Cats of the sea offer insights into territorial behavior of wild fishes
Researchers carrying out regular monitoring of a Marine Protected Area off the UK coastline noticed species of wrasse demonstrating almost cat-like behaviour as they chased lasers shone onto the seabed. (2019-11-12)
Fish oil supplements have no effect on anxiety and depression
Omega-3 fats have little or no effect on anxiety and depression according to new research. (2019-11-04)
Fish simulations provide new insights into energy costs of swimming
A new computational analysis suggests that maximizing swimming speeds while minimizing energy costs depends on an optimal balance between a fish's muscle dynamics and the way its size, shape, and swimming motion affect its movement through water. (2019-10-31)
Study finds safe mercury levels in Kotzebue Sound fish
A new analysis of Kotzebue Sound fish has found that mercury levels in a variety of its subsistence species are safe for unrestricted consumption. (2019-09-27)
Feeding dogs and cats with raw food is not considered a significant source of infections
An extensive international survey conducted at the University of Helsinki indicates that pet owners do not consider raw food to considerably increase infection risk in their household. (2019-09-06)
New viruses discovered in endangered wild Pacific salmon populations
Three new viruses -- including one from a group of viruses never before shown to infect fish -- have been discovered in endangered Chinook and sockeye salmon populations. (2019-09-04)
New artifacts suggest people arrived in North America earlier than previously thought
Stone tools and other artifacts unearthed from an archeological dig at the Cooper's Ferry site in western Idaho suggest that people lived in the area 16,000 years ago, more than a thousand years earlier than scientists previously thought. (2019-08-30)
Scientists use honey and wild salmon to trace industrial metals in the environment
Scientists have combined analyses from honey and salmon to show how lead from natural and industrial sources gets distributed throughout the environment. (2019-08-21)
Color-changing artificial 'chameleon skin' powered by nanomachines
Researchers have developed artificial 'chameleon skin' that changes colour when exposed to light and could be used in applications such as active camouflage and large-scale dynamic displays. (2019-08-21)
Shasta dam releases can be managed to benefit both salmon and sturgeon, study finds
Cold water released from Lake Shasta into the Sacramento River to benefit endangered salmon can be detrimental to young green sturgeon, a threatened species adapted to warmer water. (2019-08-20)
Helping threatened coho salmon could generate hundreds of millions in non-market economic benefits
A new study provides evidence that increasing the abundance of a threatened or endangered species can deliver large benefits to the citizens of the Pacific Northwest. (2019-08-14)
Number of US fish stocks at sustainable levels remains near record high
Today, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released the Status of US Fisheries Annual Report to Congress, which details the status of 479 federally-managed stocks or stock complexes in the US to identify which stocks are subject to overfishing, are overfished, or are rebuilt to sustainable levels. (2019-08-02)
Fearing cougars more than wolves, Yellowstone elk manage threats from both predators
Wolves are charismatic, conspicuous, and easy to single out as the top predator affecting populations of elk, deer, and other prey animals. (2019-08-02)
New research shows effectiveness of laws for protecting imperiled species, remaining gaps
New research from the Center for Conservation Innovation (CCI) at Defenders of Wildlife, published in the journal Nature Communications, shows for the first time the importance of expert agencies to protecting imperiled species. (2019-08-02)
Toxic chemicals hindering the recovery of Britain's rivers
Toxic chemicals from past decades could be hindering the recovery of Britain's urban rivers, concludes a recent study by scientists from Cardiff University, the University of Exeter, and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology. (2019-08-01)
The 'blowfish effect': Children learn new words like adults do, say Princeton researchers
Even 3- to 5-year-olds know what typical dogs and fish look like -- and they apply that knowledge when they hear new words. (2019-07-29)
New analysis reveals challenges for drought management in Oregon's Willamette River Basin
In Oregon's fertile Willamette River Basin, where two-thirds of the state's population lives, managing water scarcity would be more effective if conservation measures were introduced in advance and upstream from the locations where droughts are likely to cause shortages. (2019-07-15)
Live fast and die young, or play the long game? Scientists map 121 animal life cycles
Scientists have pinpointed the 'pace' and 'shape' of life as the two key elements in animal life cycles that affect how different species get by in the world. (2019-07-08)
Environmentally friendly control of common disease infecting fish and amphibians
Aquatic organisms in marine systems and freshwaters are threatened by fungal and fungal-like diseases globally. (2019-07-01)
Community knowledge can be as valuable as ecological knowledge in environmental decision-making
An understanding of community issues can be as valuable as knowing the ecology of an area when making environmental decisions, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School. (2019-06-12)
Salmon get a major athletic boost via a single enzyme
A single enzyme anchored to the walls of salmons' blood vessels helps reduce how hard their hearts have to work during exercise by up to 27%. (2019-06-04)
Early lives of Alaska sockeye salmon accelerating with climate change
An ample buffet of freshwater food, brought on by climate change, is altering the life history of one of the world's most important salmon species. (2019-06-04)
Improvements in water quality could reduce ecological impact of climate change on rivers
Improvements in water quality could reduce the ecological impact of climate change on rivers, finds a new study by Cardiff University's Water Research Institute and the University of Vermont. (2019-06-03)
Hot spots in rivers that nurture salmon 'flicker on and off' in Bristol Bay region
Chemical signatures imprinted on tiny stones that form inside the ears of fish show that two of Alaska's most productive salmon populations, and the fisheries they support, depend on the entire watershed. (2019-05-23)
Extreme draining of reservoir aids young salmon and eliminates invasive fish
A new study finds that the low-cost, extreme draining of a reservoir in Oregon aided downstream migration of juvenile chinook salmon -- and led to the gradual disappearance of two species of predatory invasive fish in the artificial lake. (2019-05-21)
Chemical records in teeth confirm elusive Alaska lake seals are one of a kind
Lifelong chemical records stored in the canine teeth of an elusive group of seals show that the seals remain in freshwater their entire lives and are likely a distinct population from their relatives in the ocean. (2019-05-01)
Those home-delivered meal kits are greener than you thought, new study concludes
Meal kit services, which deliver a box of pre-portioned ingredients and a chef-selected recipe to your door, are hugely popular but get a bad environmental rap due to perceived packaging waste. (2019-04-22)
Preliminary study suggests mercury not a risk in dog foods
Researchers at the University of California, Davis, recently investigated levels of methylmercury in a small sampling of commercial dog foods and found good news for dog owners. (2019-04-18)
Researchers identify early indicators of pregnancy complications in lupus patients
A study of pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus has identified early changes in the RNA molecules present in the blood that could be used to determine the likelihood of them developing preeclampsia. (2019-04-08)
Study reveals early molecular signs of high-risk pregnancy
Women who have healthy pregnancies tend to show distinct changes in the activities of immune genes starting early in pregnancy, while women who have complicated pregnancies tend to show clear departures from that pattern, according to a new study from a team led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and Hospital for Special Surgery. (2019-04-08)
Signs of 1906 earthquake revealed in mapping of offshore northern San Andreas Fault
A new high-resolution map of a poorly known section of the northern San Andreas Fault reveals signs of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and may hold some clues as to how the fault could rupture in the future, according to a new study published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2019-03-27)
Cardiorespiratory fitness of farmed Atlantic salmon unaffected by virus
The respiratory systems of Atlantic salmon function normally even when carrying large loads of piscine orthoreovirus (PRV), new University of British Columbia research has found. (2019-03-13)
Tunas, sharks and ships at sea
Researchers combine maps of marine predator habitats with satellite tracks of fishing fleets to identify regions where they overlap -- a step toward more effective wildlife management on the high seas. (2019-03-13)
In the game of love, local salmon have a home-ground advantage
Genetic analysis of thousands of salmon shows that in salmon mating, home-ground advantage applies. (2019-02-27)
Study finds experimental extreme draining of reservoir has unexpected ecological impacts
The experimental extreme draining of a reservoir in Oregon to aid downstream migration of juvenile chinook salmon is showing benefits but also a mix of unintended consequences, including changing the aquatic food web and releasing potential predators downstream. (2019-02-07)
Endangered sharks being eaten in UK
Endangered species of hammerhead and dogfish are among the sharks being sold as food in the UK, researchers have revealed. (2019-01-31)
Salmon populations may adapt their eggs to survive in degraded rivers
A University of Southampton study suggests that the membrane of salmon eggs may evolve to cope with reduced oxygen levels in rivers, thereby helping their embryos to incubate successfully. (2019-01-31)
In life and death, Alzheimer's disease looks different among Hispanic patients
searchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that autopsies of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease when they were alive -- and confirmed by autopsy -- indicate many cognitive issues symptomatic of the condition are less noticeable in living Hispanic patients. (2019-01-24)
New research proposes target omega-3 DHA level for pregnant women
A new scientific paper has, for the first time, proposed an omega-3 DHA target blood level of 5 percent or higher for pregnant women who want to reduce their risk of preterm birth. (2019-01-22)
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