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Current Sea ice News and Events

Current Sea ice News and Events, Sea ice News Articles.
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Changes in ocean 'conveyor belt' foretold abrupt climate changes by four centuries
In the Atlantic Ocean, a giant 'conveyor belt' carries warm waters from the tropics into the North Atlantic, where they cool and sink and then return southwards in the deep ocean. (2019-03-20)
Arctic sea ice 2019 wintertime extent is seventh lowest
Sea ice in the Arctic appears to have hit its annual maximum extent after growing through the fall and winter. (2019-03-20)
The INBIS channel: the most complete submarine cartography
A scientific study describes for the first time the submarine cartography of a high-latitude system in the IBIS channel, which covers tens of kilometres in the northern western area of the Barents Sea, in the Arctic Ocean. (2019-03-20)
Discovery of parasitic arsenic cycle may offer glimpse of life in future, warmer oceans
A newly discovered parasitic cycle, in which ocean bacteria keep phytoplankton on an energy-sapping treadmill of nutrient detoxification, may offer a preview of what further ocean warming will bring. (2019-03-19)
SwRI-led team identifies water-bearing minerals on asteroid Bennu
A Southwest Research Institute-led team discovered evidence of abundant water-bearing minerals on the surface of the near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu. (2019-03-19)
Mathematicians reveal secret to human sperm's swimming prowess
Researchers, from the universities of York and Oxford, have discovered that a reinforcing outer-layer which coats the tails of human sperm is what gives them the strength to make the powerful rhythmic strokes needed to break through the cervical mucus barrier. (2019-03-19)
New perspective on changing travel conditions in Arctic communities
Inuit communities' travel skills and regional knowledge have helped mitigate the effects of Arctic climate change on travel conditions, according to a new study. (2019-03-18)
Advances point the way to smaller, safer batteries
New Cornell research advances the design of solid-state batteries, a technology that is inherently safer and more energy-dense than today's lithium-ion batteries, which rely on flammable liquid electrolytes for fast transfer of chemical energy stored in molecular bonds to electricity. (2019-03-18)
Materials could delay frost up to 300 times longer than existing anti-icing coatings
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Engineering describe for the first time several unique properties of materials known as phase-switching liquids, or PSLs, that hold promise as next-generation anti-icing materials. (2019-03-18)
New SDSU study examines role of sea urchins on California kelp
California sheephead and spiny lobsters may be helping control sea urchin populations in Southern California kelp forests, where sea otters -- a top urchin predator -- have long been missing, according to a new San Diego State University (SDSU) study published in the journal Ecology. (2019-03-14)
Sea otters' tool use leaves behind distinctive archaeological evidence
An international team of researchers has analyzed the use by sea otters of large, shoreline rocks as 'anvils' to break open shells, as well as the resulting shell middens. (2019-03-14)
Can an antifreeze protein also promote ice formation?
Antifreeze is life's means of surviving in cold winters: Natural antifreeze proteins help fish, insects, plants and even bacteria live through low temperatures that should turn their liquid parts to deadly shards of ice. (2019-03-14)
Unique diversity of the genetic history of the Iberian Peninsula revealed by dual studies
Researchers have analyzed ancient DNA from almost 300 individuals from the Iberian Peninsula, spanning more than 12,000 years, in two studies published today in Current Biology and Science. (2019-03-14)
Tectonics in the tropics trigger Earth's ice ages, study finds
Over the last 540 million years, the Earth has weathered three major ice ages -- periods during which global temperatures plummeted, producing extensive ice sheets and glaciers that have stretched beyond the polar caps. (2019-03-14)
Tracking turtles with telemetry
A new model has been created that can forecast the location of Eastern Pacific leatherback turtles along the coast of Central and South America in an effort to decrease bycatch mortality of this critically endangered and ecologically important species. (2019-03-14)
Sources and sinks
For the entire history of our species, humans have lived on a planet capped by a chunk of ice at each pole. (2019-03-14)
The day the world burned
When UC Santa Barbara geology professor emeritus James Kennett and colleagues set out years ago to examine signs of a major cosmic impact that occurred toward the end of the Pleistocene epoch, little did they know just how far-reaching the projected climatic effect would be. (2019-03-13)
From Stone Age chips to microchips: How tiny tools may have made us human
Anthropologists have long made the case that tool-making is one of the key behaviors that separated our human ancestors from other primates. (2019-03-12)
The fiddlers influencing mangrove ecosystems
The types of bacteria living in and around fiddler crab burrows vary widely between mangroves, but their functional activities are remarkably similar. (2019-03-11)
Southern Ocean acidification puts marine organisms at risk
New research co-authored by University of Alaska indicates that acidification of the Southern Ocean will cause a layer of water to form below the surface that corrodes the shells of some sea snails. (2019-03-11)
Researchers uncover additional evidence for massive solar storms
Solar storms can be far more powerful than previously thought. (2019-03-11)
Atmospheric scientists reveal the effect of sea-ice loss on Arctic warming
Analyses indicate that Arctic amplification would not slow down until the 22nd and 23rd centuries. (2019-03-08)
It's raining on the Greenland ice -- in the winter
Rainy weather is becoming increasingly common over parts of the Greenland ice sheet, triggering sudden melting events that are eating at the ice and priming the surface for more widespread future melting, says a new study. (2019-03-07)
How antifreeze proteins make ice crystals grow
Bacteria, plants, insects, or even fish use antifreeze proteins to protect themselves from the cold. (2019-03-07)
New satellite keeps close watch on Antarctic ice loss
A recently-launched satellite mission has captured precision data on the elevation of the Antarctic ice sheet proving a valuable addition to monitoring efforts in the region, according to work published this week in The Cryosphere. (2019-03-06)
As sea level rises, wetlands crank up their carbon storage
Some wetlands perform better under pressure. A new Nature study revealed that when faced with sea-level rise, coastal wetlands respond by burying even more carbon in their soils. (2019-03-06)
Migrating snowline plays outsized role in setting pace of Greenland ice melt
Meltwater from Greenland's ice sheet is a leading contributor to global sea level rise, and a Brown University study shows that an underappreciated factor -- the position of the snowline on the ice sheet -- plays a key role in setting the pace of melting. (2019-03-06)
Radiography of marine litter in Spanish waters
Marine litter is a growing problem in the Mediterranean Sea, but few studies have focused on its composition, spatial distribution and temporal evolution. (2019-03-04)
Human 'footprint' on Antarctica measured for first time
The full extent of the human 'footprint' on Antarctica has been revealed for the first time by new IMAS-led research which used satellite images to measure stations, huts, runways, waste sites and tourist camps at 158 locations. (2019-03-04)
Mystery of green icebergs may soon be solved
Researchers have proposed a new idea that may explain why some Antarctic icebergs are tinged emerald green rather than the normal blue, potentially solving a decades-long scientific mystery. (2019-03-04)
How to catch a magnetic monopole in the act
A research team led by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has created a nanoscale 'playground' on a chip that simulates the formation of exotic magnetic particles called 'monopoles.' The study could unlock the secrets to ever-smaller, more powerful memory devices, microelectronics, and next-generation hard drives that employ the power of magnetic spin to store data. (2019-03-04)
Thousands of tiny quakes shake Antarctic ice at night
UChicago scientists placed seismometers on the McMurdo Ice Shelf and recorded hundreds of thousands of tiny 'ice quakes' that appear to be caused by pools of partially melted ice expanding and freezing at night. (2019-03-04)
Drilling results reveal global climate influence on basin waters in young rifts
New results from the Gulf of Corinth, Greece, a continental rift zone where the first stage of ocean basin formation is taking place, show how the environmental conditions and sediment input into the rift basin changed as the Earth alternated between non-glaciated to glaciated conditions over the last 500 thousand years. (2019-02-28)
500-million-year old worm 'superhighway' discovered in Canada
Prehistoric worms populated the sea bed 500 million years ago--evidence that life was active in an environment thought uninhabitable until now, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows. (2019-02-28)
Junk food purchases increase after recreational marijuana legalization
New research by a UConn economist found a link between state recreational marijuana legalization and increased consumption of certain high-calorie foods. (2019-02-28)
Climate change shrinks many fisheries globally, Rutgers-led study finds
Climate change has taken a toll on many of the world's fisheries, and overfishing has magnified the problem, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Science today. (2019-02-28)
Warm seas scatter fish
Fish provide a vital source of protein for over half the world's population, with over 56 million people employed by or subsisting on fisheries. (2019-02-28)
Ice-free Arctic summers could happen on earlier side of predictions
The Arctic Ocean could become ice-free in the summer in the next 20 years due to a natural, long-term warming phase in the tropical Pacific that adds to human-caused warming, according to a new study. (2019-02-27)
Northwest Coast clam gardens nearly 2,000 years older than previously thought -- study
A study led by SFU archaeology professor Dana Lepofsky and Hakai Institute researcher Nicole Smith reveals that clam gardens, ancient Indigenous food security systems located along B.C.'s coast, date back at least 3,500 years -- almost 2,000 years older than previously thought. (2019-02-27)
Ancient rocks provide clues to Earth's early history
A research team led by scientists at Arizona State University has provided compelling evidence for significant ocean oxygenation before the GOE, on a larger scale and to greater depths than previously recognized (2019-02-25)
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