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Current Sea level News and Events

Current Sea level News and Events, Sea level News Articles.
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The ancient people in the high-latitude Arctic had well-developed trade
Russian scientists studied the Zhokhov site of ancient people, which is located in the high-latitude Arctic, and described in detail the way of life of the ancient people had lived there. (2019-02-22)
NASA takes an infrared analysis of Tropical Cyclone Oma
An infrared look by NASA's Aqua satellite revealed where the strongest storms were located within the Southern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Cyclone Oma. (2019-02-21)
Simulated ocean mesoscale structures induce air-sea interaction
Using the Community Earth System Model framework, the authors build a very high-resolution quasi-global coupled model by coupling an eddy-resolving quasi-global ocean model with a high-resolution atmospheric model. (2019-02-20)
Researchers discover a flipping crab feeding on methane seeps
Researchers have documented a group of tanner crabs vigorously feeding at a methane seep on the seafloor off British Columbia -- one of the first times a commercially harvested species has been seen using this energy source. (2019-02-20)
From sea to lab
With its vast numbers of different lifeforms, the sea is a largely unexplored source of natural products that could be starting points for new pharmaceuticals, such as the antitumor drugs trabectedin and lurbinectedin. (2019-02-18)
'Seeing' tails help sea snakes avoid predators
New research has revealed the fascinating adaptation of some Australian sea snakes that helps protect their vulnerable paddle-shaped tails from predators. (2019-02-15)
Tide gauges capture tremor episodes in cascadian subduction zone
Hourly water level records collected from tide gauges can be used to measure land uplift caused by episodic tremor and slip of slow earthquakes in the Cascadia Subduction Zone, according to a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2019-02-15)
What rising seas mean for local economies
High-tide flooding resulting from climate change is already disrupting the economy of Annapolis, Md. (2019-02-15)
Sea worms and jellyfish treat cancer and kill insects
Scientists of the Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (PIBOC) of the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS) and the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) found out marine invertebrates living in Troitsa Bay, the Sea of Japan, contain biologically active compounds with strong antitumor and antimicrobial properties, and also capable of killing insects. (2019-02-14)
The smallest skeletons in the marine world observed in 3D by synchrotron techniques
Coccolithophores are microscopic marine algae that use carbon dioxide to grow and release carbon dioxide when they create their miniature calcite shells. (2019-02-14)
NASA's Aqua satellite finds winds battering Tropical Cyclone Gelena
Tropical Cyclone Gelena is being battered by outside winds, and that's weakening the storm. (2019-02-14)
Ice shelves buckle under weight of meltwater lakes
Researchers have recorded first the field measurements of Antarctic ice shelf flexure, which can lead to ice shelf break up. (2019-02-13)
Surface lakes cause Antarctic ice shelves to 'flex'
The filling and draining of meltwater lakes has been found to cause a floating Antarctic ice shelf to flex, potentially threatening its stability. (2019-02-13)
Study yields new clues to predict tipping points for marsh survival
Sea-level rise, sediment starvation and other environmental woes pose increasing threats to coastal wetlands worldwide. (2019-02-13)
Ice volume calculated anew
Researchers have provided a new estimate for the glacier ice volume all around the world, excluding the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. (2019-02-12)
NASA-NOAA satellite finds Tropical Cyclone Gelena sheared
Wind shear can push tropical cyclones apart and satellite imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite revealed that is what is happening to Tropical Cyclone Gelena in the Southern Indian Ocean. (2019-02-12)
Texas A&M researchers develop fire-retardant coating featuring renewable materials
Texas A&M University researchers are developing a new kind of flame-retardant coating using renewable, nontoxic materials readily found in nature, which could provide even more effective fire protection for several widely used materials (2019-02-12)
Wave device could deliver clean energy to thousands of homes
A device that could convert wave energy into electricity has been demonstrated in scaled trials at the University of Edinburgh's circular testing tank, FloWave. (2019-02-12)
Arctic sea ice loss in the past linked to abrupt climate events
A new study on ice cores shows that reductions in sea ice in the Arctic in the period between 30-100,000 years ago led to major climate events. (2019-02-11)
New deep sea animal discoveries warrant expanded protections in Costa Rican waters
Scientists aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute's research vessel Falkor surveyed deep-sea seamounts outside Isla del Coco UNESCO World Heritage site revealing coral communities with surprising diversity. (2019-02-11)
Climate change may destroy tiger's home
A James Cook University scientist says the last coastal stronghold of an iconic predator, the endangered Bengal tiger, could be destroyed by climate change and rising sea levels over the next 50 years. (2019-02-10)
Munitions at the bottom of the Baltic Sea
The bottom of the Baltic Sea is home to large quantities of sunken munitions, a legacy of the Second World War -- and often very close to shore. (2019-02-08)
Sea snakes that can't drink seawater
New research from the University of Florida shows that pelagic sea snakes quench their thirst by drinking freshwater that collects on the surface of the ocean after heavy rainfall. (2019-02-08)
Deep sea reveals linkage between earthquake and carbon cycle
In order to understand the global carbon cycle, deep-sea exploration is essential, an international team led by geologists from Innsbruck concludes. (2019-02-07)
Cracks herald the calving of a large iceberg from Petermann Glacier
Cracks in the floating ice tongue of Petermann Glacier in the far northwest reaches of Greenland indicate the pending loss of another large iceberg. (2019-02-06)
2018 fourth warmest year in continued warming trend, according to NASA, NOAA
Earth's global surface temperatures in 2018 were the fourth warmest since 1880, according to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). (2019-02-06)
Melting ice sheets may cause 'climate chaos' according to new modelling
The weather these days is wild and will be wilder still within a century. (2019-02-06)
Volcanic growth 'critical' to the formation of Panama
Scientists put forward new explanation as to how land bridge formed between North and South America. (2019-02-05)
Differences in water temperature can create new marine species
Warm and cool water temperatures over a long stretch of coastline cause new species of marine fish to evolve without being isolated from similar types of fish nearby, according to a new international study. (2019-02-05)
A warming world increases air pollution
The UC Riverside-led study shows that the contrast in warming between the continents and sea, called the land-sea warming contrast, drives an increased concentration of aerosols in the atmosphere that cause air pollution. (2019-02-04)
Novel hypothesis goes underground to predict future of Greenland ice sheet
The Greenland ice sheet melted a little more easily in the past than it does today because of geological changes, and most of Greenland's ice can be saved from melting if warming is controlled, says a team of Penn State researchers. (2019-02-01)
China launched world's first rocket-deployed weather instruments from unmanned semi-submersible vehicle
For the first time in history, Chinese scientists have launched a rocketsonde -- a rocket designed to perform weather observations in areas beyond the range of weather balloons -- from an unmanned semi-submersible vehicle (USSV) that has been solely designed and specially developed by China for this task. (2019-01-31)
European waters drive ocean overturning, key for regulating climate
An international study reveals the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, which helps regulate Earth's climate, is highly variable and primarily driven by the conversion of warm, salty, shallow waters into colder, fresher, deep waters moving south through the Irminger and Iceland basins. (2019-01-31)
First 'OSNAP' results alter understanding of Atlantic overturning circulation variability
Contradicting the prevailing view on what causes major changes to a climate-regulating ocean circulation pattern in the northern hemisphere, the first results from the 'OSNAP' project, an internationally collaborative effort designed to monitor large-scale ocean dynamics, report that deep water formation in the Labrador Sea does not drive Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) variability. (2019-01-31)
Factors in 'alarming rate' of cold-stranded sea turtles in Cape Cod Bay
The number of cold-stunning and stranding events among juvenile Kemp's ridley sea turtles, one of the world's most endangered species, is increasing at an 'alarming' rate and has moved north from Long Island Sound to Cape Cod Bay, say researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Mass Audubon and the University of Rhode Island. (2019-01-31)
Tulane study says seas may be rising faster than thought
A new Tulane University study questions the reliability of how sea-level rise in low-lying coastal areas such as southern Louisiana is measured and suggests that the current method underestimates the severity of the problem. (2019-01-30)
Once-abundant sea stars imperiled by disease along West Coast
Ocean warming and an infectious wasting disease has devastated populations of large sunflower sea stars once abundant along the West Coast of North America in just a few years, according to research co-led by the University of California, Davis, and Cornell University. (2019-01-30)
Key sea star predator wiped out by disease and abnormally warm waters
From California to British Columbia, the abundance of sunflower starfish -- an important predator in the Northeast Pacific -- declined dramatically in both nearshore and deep waters from 2013 to 2015, according to a new study that leveraged citizen science diving surveys. (2019-01-30)
Carbon dioxide emissions from global fisheries larger than previously thought
Carbon dioxide emissions from fuel burnt by fishing boats are 30 per cent higher than previously reported, researchers with the Sea Around Us initiative at the University of British Columbia and the Sea Around Us -- Indian Ocean at the University of Western Australia have found. (2019-01-30)
Earthquake in super slo-mo
A big earthquake occurred south of Istanbul in the summer of 2016, but it was so slow that nobody noticed. (2019-01-29)
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