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Current Sea level News and Events, Sea level News Articles.
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How puffins catch food outside the breeding season
Little is known about how seabirds catch their food outside the breeding season but using modern technology, researchers at the University of Liverpool and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology have gained new insight into their feeding habits. (2019-07-17)
Sea level rise requires extra management to maintain salt marshes
Salt marshes are important habitats for fish and birds and protect coasts under sea level rise against stronger wave attacks. (2019-07-17)
Stone tool changes may show how Mesolithic hunter-gatherers responded to changing climate
The development of new hunting projectiles by European hunter-gatherers during the Mesolithic may have been linked to territoriality in a rapidly-changing climate, according to a study published July 17, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Philippe Crombé from Ghent University, Belgium. (2019-07-17)
Artificial snowfall could save the west antarctic ice sheet, but with high costs and risks
By pumping ocean water onto coastal regions surrounding parts of the West Antarctic ice sheet and converting it to snow, it may be possible to prevent the ice sheet from sliding into the ocean and melting, according to a new modeling study. (2019-07-17)
West Antarctic ice collapse may be prevented by snowing ocean water onto it
The ice sheet covering West Antarctica is at risk of sliding off into the ocean. (2019-07-17)
Correcting historic sea surface temperature measurements
Why did the oceans warm and cool at such different rates in the early 20th century? (2019-07-17)
Tracking down climate change with radar eyes
Over the past 22 years, sea levels in the Arctic have risen an average of 2.2 millimeters per year. (2019-07-16)
DNA analysis reveals cryptic underwater ecosystem engineers
They look like smears of pink bubblegum on the rocks off British Columbia's coast, indistinguishable from one another. (2019-07-11)
UNH research finds thicker pavement is more cost effective down the road
Pavements, which are vulnerable to increased temperatures and excessive flooding due to sea level rise, can crack and crumble. (2019-07-10)
Sloppy sea urchins
Marine scientists discover an important, overlooked role sea urchins play in the kelp forest ecosystem. (2019-07-10)
Paris Agreement does not rule out ice-free Arctic
IBS research team reveals a considerable chance for an ice-free Arctic Ocean at global warming limits stipulated in the Paris Agreement. (2019-07-09)
Paleoproterozoic dolomites elucidate the development of Precambrian marine systems
Dolomite is widely in the metal industry as a fireproof material and in construction, such as for joint grouting in panel building. (2019-07-09)
Aphrodisiac pheromone discovered in fish semen
An aphrodisiac pheromone discovered in the semen of sea lampreys attracts ready-to-mate females, according to a study publishing July 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Anne M. (2019-07-09)
Smells like love...to sea lampreys
Some people are drawn to cologne; others are attracted to perfume. (2019-07-09)
Why is east Asian summer monsoon circulation enhanced under global warming?
A collaborated study shows that the Tibetan Plateau plays an essential role in enhancing the East Asian summer monsoon circulation under global warming through enhanced latent heating over the Tibetan Plateau. (2019-07-08)
Exploiting green tides thanks to a marine bacterium
Ulvan is the principal component of Ulva or 'sea lettuce' which causes algal blooms (green tides). (2019-07-08)
Istanbul: Seafloor study proves earthquake risk for the first time
Istanbul is located in close proximity to the North Anatolian fault, a boundary between two major tectonic plates where devastating earthquakes occur frequently. (2019-07-08)
Ancient Saharan seaway shows how Earth's climate and creatures can undergo extreme change
A new paper integrates 20 years of research by a diverse scientific team and describes the ancient Trans-Saharan Seaway of Africa that existed 50 to 100 million years ago in the region of the current Sahara Desert. (2019-07-08)
Altered gene expression may trigger collapse of symbiotic relationship
Researchers in Japan have identified the potential genes responsible for coral bleaching caused by temperature elevation. (2019-07-04)
Corals in Singapore likely to survive sea-level rise: NUS study
Marine scientists from the National University of Singapore found that coral species in Singapore's sedimented and turbid waters are unlikely to be impacted by accelerating sea-level rise (2019-07-01)
New measurements shed light on the impact of water temperatures on glacier calving
Calving, or the breaking off of icebergs from glaciers, has increased at many glaciers along the west coast of Svalbard. (2019-07-01)
New study solves mystery of salt buildup on bottom of Dead Sea
New research explains why salt crystals are piling up on the deepest parts of the Dead Sea's floor, a finding that could help scientists understand how large salt deposits formed in Earth's geologic past. (2019-07-01)
Scientists discover the forces behind extreme heat over Northeast Asia
To understand what caused the extreme heat over Northeast Asia, a scientific collaboration of climatologists examined the forces of the tropical circulation and sea surface temperature. (2019-06-24)
Clouds dominate uncertainties in predicting future Greenland melt
New research led by climate scientists from the University of Bristol suggests that the representation of clouds in climate models is as, or more, important than the amount of greenhouse gas emissions when it comes to projecting future Greenland ice sheet melt. (2019-06-24)
FEFU scientist reported on concentration of pesticides in marine organisms
According to ecotoxicologist from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), from the 90s and during 2000s in the tissues of Russian Far Eastern mussels the concentration of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) that had been globally used in agriculture in the mid-twentieth century has increased about ten times. (2019-06-19)
New research shows an iceless Greenland may be in our future
New research from the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute shows that Greenland may be ice-free by the year 3000. (2019-06-19)
Marine microbiology -- Successful extremists
In nutrient-poor deep-sea sediments, microbes belonging to the Archaea have outcompeted bacterial microorganisms for millions of years. (2019-06-19)
Study predicts more long-term sea level rise from Greenland ice
Greenland's melting ice sheet could generate more sea level rise than previously thought if greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase and warm the atmosphere at their current rate, according to a new modeling study. (2019-06-19)
Changing how we predict coral bleaching
A remote sensing algorithm offers better predictions of Red Sea coral bleaching and can be fine tuned for use in other tropical marine ecosystems. (2019-06-18)
Risky business: New data show how manatees use shipping channels
A new publication in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science tracks West Indian manatee movements through nearshore and offshore ship channels in the north-central Gulf of Mexico. (2019-06-18)
New insight from Great Barrier Reef coral provides correction factor to climate records
Newly developed geological techniques help uncover the most accurate and high-resolution climate records to date, according to a new study. (2019-06-18)
Sea otters have low genetic diversity like other threatened species, biologists report
Sea otters have very low genetic diversity, a UCLA-led team of life scientists reports June 18 in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution. (2019-06-18)
Appearance of deep-sea fish does not signal upcoming earthquake in Japan
The unusual appearance of deep-sea fish like the oarfish or slender ribbonfish in Japanese shallow waters does not mean that an earthquake is about to occur, according to a new statistical analysis. (2019-06-18)
Crocs' climate clock: Ancient distribution of Crocs could reveal more about past climates
Underneath their tough exteriors, some crocodilians have a sensitive side that scientists could use to shine light on our ancient climate, according to new findings published in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. (2019-06-18)
Good viruses and bad bacteria: A world-first green sea turtle trial
A world-first study at James Cook University in Australia has found an alternative to antibiotics for treating bacterial infections in green sea turtles. (2019-06-18)
100-year-old physics model replicates modern Arctic ice melt
A nearly 100-year-old physics model captures the essential mechanism of pattern formation and geometry of Arctic melt ponds. (2019-06-17)
Boaty McBoatface mission gives new insight into warming ocean abyss
The first mission involving the autonomous submarine vehicle Autosub Long Range (better known as 'Boaty McBoatface') has for the first time shed light on a key process linking increasing Antarctic winds to rising sea temperatures. (2019-06-17)
The current Nor­we­gian Bar­ents Sea risk governance frame­work would need con­sid­er­able
A recent case study from the University of Helsinki examines different ways of framing oil spill risks with regard to the Norwegian Barents Sea where new areas have been recently opened for oil exploration and exploitation. (2019-06-14)
NASA finds tropical cyclone Vayu off India's Gujarat coast
NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Vayu still lingering near the northwestern coast of India, and its cloud-filled eye remained offshore. (2019-06-14)
No direct link between north Atlantic currents, sea level along New England coast
A new study by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) clarifies what influence major currents in the North Atlantic have on sea level along the northeastern United States. (2019-06-14)
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