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The hidden underwater map of the past
The UPV/EHU's Department of Mineralogy and Petrology explores the rocky, undersea, coastal platforms of the Quaternary to study the formation of the underwater landscape in the past. (2020-06-01)
Loggerhead sea turtles host diverse community of miniature organisms
An international team led by Florida State University researchers found that more than double the number of organisms than previously observed live on the shells of these oceanic reptiles, raising important questions about loggerhead sea turtle ecology and conservation. (2020-06-01)
A rising tide of marine disease? How parasites respond to a warming world
A recent study from the University of Washington explores the ways parasitism will respond to climate change, providing researchers new insights into disease transmission. (2020-05-29)
Sea snakes have been adapting to see underwater for 15 million years
A study led by the University of Plymouth (UK) has for the first time provided evidence of where, when and how frequently species have adapted their ability to see in color. (2020-05-28)
Antarctic ice sheets capable of retreating up to 50 meters per day
The ice shelves surrounding the Antarctic coastline retreated at speeds of up to 50 meters per day at the end of the last Ice Age, far more rapid than the satellite-derived retreat rates observed today, new research has found. (2020-05-28)
Delicate seafloor ridges reveal the rapid retreat of past Antarctic ice
Detailed seafloor mapping of submerged glacial landforms finds that Antarctic ice sheets in the past retreated far faster than the most rapid pace of retreat observed today, exceeding even the most extreme modern rates by at least an order of magnitude, according to a new study. (2020-05-28)
The deep ocean is warming slowly -- but dramatic changes are ahead
The world's deep oceans are warming at a slower rate than the surface, but it's still not good news for deep-sea creatures according to an international study. (2020-05-25)
Mississippi Delta marshes in a state of irreversible collapse, Tulane study shows
A key finding of the study, published in Science Advances, is that coastal marshes experience tipping points, where a small increase in the rate of sea-level rise leads to widespread submergence. (2020-05-22)
Indigenous collaboration and leadership key to managing sea otter population recovery
A new study highlights the need to engage Indigenous communities in managing sea otter population recovery to improve coexistence between humans and this challenging predator. (2020-05-21)
Faster breeding sea urchins: A comeback animal model for developmental biology
University of Tsukuba researchers identified a species of sea urchin with a relatively short breeding cycle of six months. (2020-05-19)
How climate killed corals
A squad of climate-related factors is responsible for the massive Australian coral bleaching event of 2016. (2020-05-18)
What does drought mean for endangered California salmon?
Droughts threatens California's endangered salmon population -- but pools that serve as drought refuges could make the difference between life and death for these vulnerable fish. (2020-05-18)
Sea skaters are a super source of inspiration
A study of marine Halobates species highlights how their waterproofing techniques, size and acceleration capability helped them colonize the ocean. (2020-05-15)
Modern sea-level rise linked to human activities, Rutgers research reaffirms
New research by Rutgers scientists reaffirms that modern sea-level rise is linked to human activities and not to changes in Earth's orbit. (2020-05-15)
NASA's ICESat-2 measures arctic ocean's sea ice thickness, snow cover
Arctic sea ice helps keep Earth cool, as its bright surface reflects the Sun's energy back into space. (2020-05-14)
Researchers reveal largest and hottest shield volcano on Earth
Researchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa revealed the largest and hottest shield volcano on Earth--Pūhāhonu, a volcano within the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. (2020-05-14)
A lost world and extinct ecosystem
The field study site of Pinnacle Point, South Africa, sits at the center of the earliest evidence for symbolic behavior, complex pyrotechnology, projectile weapons, and the first use of foods from the sea, both geographically and scientifically, having contributed much on the evolutionary road to being a modern human. (2020-05-14)
Study suggests remnants of human migration paths exist underwater at 'choke points'
A study in Geographical Review shows evidence vital to understanding human prehistory beneath the seas in places that were dry during the Last Glacial Maximum. (2020-05-12)
Sea level could rise by more than 1 meter by 2100 if emission targets are not met
An international study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists found that the global mean sea-level rise could exceed 1 meter by 2100 and 5 meters by 2300 if global targets on emissions are not achieved. (2020-05-08)
Benthos in the Antarctic Weddell Sea in decline
Over the past quarter-century, changes in Antarctic sea-ice cover have had profound impacts on life on the ocean floor. (2020-05-07)
Going against the trend
Global warming has affected the entire planet's surface, except for one particular area of the ocean, which has bucked the trend. (2020-05-06)
URI professor: Climate change increases risk of fisheries conflict
A team of experts, led by a University of Rhode Island researcher, examined how climate change is affecting the ocean environment and found that the changing conditions will likely result in increased fisheries-related conflicts and create new challenges in the management of global fisheries. (2020-05-04)
How synaptic changes translate to behavior changes
Learning changes behavior by altering many connections between brain cells in a variety of ways all at the same time, according to a study of sea slugs recently published in JNeurosci. (2020-05-04)
Multiple flooding sources threaten Honolulu's infrastructure
In a study published in Scientific Reports, researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, found in the next few decades, sea level rise will likely cause large and increasing percentages of land area to be impacted simultaneously by the three flood mechanisms. (2020-05-04)
Magnetic pulses alter salmon's orientation, suggesting navigation via magnetite in tissue
Researchers have taken a step closer to solving one of nature's most remarkable mysteries: How do salmon, when it's time to spawn, find their way back from distant ocean locations to the stream where they hatched? (2020-05-02)
Seafloor currents may direct microplastics to biodiversity hotspots of the deep
Microplastic particles entering the sea surface were thought to settle to the seafloor directly below them, but now, a new study reveals that slow-moving currents near the bottom of the ocean direct the flow of plastics, creating microplastic hotpots in sediments of the deep sea. (2020-04-30)
Data from 2 space lasers comprehensively estimate polar ice loss and sea level rise
Ice sheet losses from Greenland and Antarctica have outpaced snow accumulation and contributed approximately 14 millimeters to sea level rise over 16 years (2003 to 2019), a new analysis of data from NASA's laser-shooting satellites has revealed. (2020-04-30)
Scientists find highest ever level of microplastics on seafloor
An international research project has revealed the highest levels of microplastic ever recorded on the seafloor, with up to 1.9 million pieces in a thin layer covering just 1 square meter. (2020-04-30)
Simulated deep-sea mining affects ecosystem functions at the seafloor
The environmental impact of deep-sea mining is only partially known. (2020-04-29)
Underprotected marine protected areas in a global biodiversity hotspot
Through the assessment of the 1,062 MPAs in the Mediterranean Sea, covering 6% of the Mediterranean Basin, a research team has shown that 95% of the total area protected lacks regulations to reduce human impacts on biodiversity. (2020-04-24)
Jurassic Park in Eastern Morocco: Paleontology of the Kem Kem Group
The Kem Kem beds in Morocco are famous for the spectacular fossils found there, including at least four large-bodied non-avian theropods, several large-bodied pterosaurs and crocodilians. (2020-04-23)
Disappearing Alaskan sea ice is significant for Arctic marine ecosystem
A new study shows that plant materials originating in Arctic sea ice are significantly incorporated into marine food webs that are used for subsistence in local communities of the greater Bering Strait region. (2020-04-22)
A rare snail living on wood is discovered in the Arctic ocean
Postgraduate student Ekaterina Krol and Senior Research Associate at the Department of Applied Ecology of St Petersburg University Ivan Nekhaev have found a marine snail from the subclass Neomphaliones in a collection from the Soviet Arctic expeditions of the 1930s. (2020-04-22)
New ethane-munching microbes discovered at hot vents
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen have discovered a microbe that feeds on ethane at deep-sea hot vents. (2020-04-21)
North pole will be ice-free in summer
Summer Arctic sea-ice is predicted to disappear before 2050, resulting in devastating consequences for the Arctic ecosystem. (2020-04-21)
International team develops new model to improve accuracy of storm surge analysis
A new international study published this week in the journal Nature Communications, applied a novel statistical method that -- for the first time -- captures the important interactions between tides and storm surges. (2020-04-21)
North pole soon to be ice free in summer
The Arctic Ocean in summer will very likely be ice free before 2050, at least temporally. (2020-04-20)
Scientists reveal a close relationship between air temperature and the area of Antarctic polynyas
Reanalysis and observational data reveal interactive effects between air temperature and the area of the Terra Nova Bay polynya. (2020-04-20)
What did scientists learn from Deepwater Horizon?
In a review paper published in the journal Nature Reviews Earth & Environment, WHOI scientists review what they-- and their science colleagues from around the world--have learned from studying the spill over the past decade. (2020-04-20)
Arctic research expedition likely faces extreme conditions in fast-changing Arctic
Scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have simulated conditions along potential routes for the MOSAiC polar expedition, using today's conditions in the 'new Arctic.' The results suggest that thinner sea ice may carry the ship farther than would be expected compared to historical conditions and the sea ice around the ship may melt earlier than the 12-month goal. (2020-04-20)
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