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Current Sediment News and Events

Current Sediment News and Events, Sediment News Articles.
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Cosmic pearls: Fossil clams in Florida contain evidence of ancient meteorite
Researchers picking through the contents of fossil clams from a Sarasota County quarry found dozens of tiny glass beads, likely the calling cards of an ancient meteorite. (2019-07-22)
Radiation in parts of Marshall Islands is higher than Chernobyl
Radiation levels in parts of the Marshall Islands in the central Pacific Ocean, where the United States conducted nearly 70 nuclear tests during the Cold War, are still alarmingly high. (2019-07-17)
Ancient Roman port history unveiled
A team of international researchers led by La Trobe University and the University of Melbourne have, for the first time worldwide, applied marine geology techniques at an ancient harbour archaeological site to uncover ancient harbour technologies of the first centuries AD. (2019-07-15)
Scientists develop new method for studying early life in ancient rocks
Scientists have developed a new method for detecting traces of primordial life in ancient rock formations using potassium. (2019-07-08)
Winter monsoons became stronger during geomagnetic reversal
New evidence suggests that high-energy particles from space known as galactic cosmic rays affect the Earth's climate by increasing cloud cover, causing an 'umbrella effect'. (2019-07-03)
News from the diamond nursery
Unlike flawless gems, fibrous diamonds often contain small saline inclusions. (2019-06-19)
Zipingpu Reservoir reveals climate-tectonics interplay around 2008 Wenchuan earthquake
A new study led by Prof. JIN Zhangdong from the Institute of Earth Environment (IEE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences provided a new insight on the interplay between climate and tectonics from a sediment record in the Zipingpu Reservoir around the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. (2019-06-18)
Fifty years later, DDT lingers in lake ecosystems
To control pest outbreaks, airplanes sprayed more than 6,280 tons of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) onto forests in New Brunswick, Canada, between 1952 and 1968, according to Environment Canada. (2019-06-12)
River sediment speaks to changing climate
Studying the sediment of a mountain river can reveal thousands of years or more of a waterway's history, including new threats from more frequent wildfires and increased precipitation brought by climate change. (2019-06-11)
57% of the plastic waste on the Tarragona coast is clothing fibers from washing machines
The sea water, beaches and sediments on the Tarragona coast contain quantities of plastic similar to those in a big city like Barcelona. (2019-06-10)
Sediment from fishing choking out sea sponges, study shows
Sediment stirred up from fishing activity has a negative effect on reef-building sea sponges in northern British Columbia, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-06-06)
Glacial sediments greased the gears of plate tectonics
According to new research, the transition to plate tectonics started with the help of lubricating sediments, scraped by glaciers from the slopes of Earth's first continents. (2019-06-05)
Researchers find seaweed helps trap carbon dioxide in sediment
Florida State University researchers working with colleagues in the United Kingdom have found that these slimy macroalgae play an important role in permanently removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. (2019-06-03)
Over half a million corals destroyed by port of Miami dredging, study finds
A team of researchers including scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, published new findings that reveal significant damage to Miami's coral reefs from the 16-month dredging operation at the Port of Miami that began in 2013. (2019-05-30)
Earth recycles ocean floor into diamonds
Most diamonds are made of cooked seabed. The diamond on your finger is most likely made of recycled seabed cooked deep in the Earth. (2019-05-29)
Fossil zooplankton indicate that marine ecosystems have entered the Anthropocene
Climate change caused by humans impacts species diversity and ecosystems. (2019-05-28)
Lake sediment records reveal recent floods in NW England (UK) unprecedented
A new study of UK lake sediment records stretching back over several centuries has found that the floods that hit Northern England in 2009 and 2015 ('Storm Desmond'),were the largest in 600 years, pointing to the impact of climate changes on the frequency and magnitude of these extreme events. (2019-05-21)
Ice-sheet variability during the last ice age from the perspective of marine sediment
By using marine sediment cores from Northwestern Australia, a Japanese team led by National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) and the University of Tokyo revealed that the global ice sheet during the last ice age had changed in shorter time scale than previously thought. (2019-05-15)
Study demonstrates seagrass' strong potential for curbing erosion
An MIT study shows how seagrass can help to protect shorelines against erosion and help to mitigate damage from rising sea level, potentially providing useful guidance for seagrass restoration efforts. (2019-05-03)
Scientists discover evolutionary link to modern-day sea echinoderms
Scientists at The Ohio State University have discovered a new species that lived more than 500 million years ago -- a form of ancient echinoderm that was ancestral to modern-day groups such as sea cucumbers, sea urchins, sea stars, brittle stars and crinoids. (2019-05-02)
New clues to coastal erosion
New research has uncovered a missing nutrient source in coastal oceans, which could promote better water quality and sand management on popular beaches. (2019-05-01)
Salish seafloor mapping identifies earthquake and tsunami risks
The central Salish Sea of the Pacific Northwest is bounded by two active fault zones that could trigger rockfalls and slumps of sediment that might lead to tsunamis, according to a presentation at the 2019 SSA Annual Meeting. (2019-04-24)
Minerals in mountain rivers tell the story of landslide activity upstream
Scientists have come up with a new way of analyzing sand in mountain rivers to determine the activity of landslides upstream, which has important implications for understanding natural hazards in mountainous regions. (2019-04-24)
Eclogitic diamonds formed from oceanic crust, study shows
Eclogitic diamonds formed in Earth's mantle originate from oceanic crust, rather than marine sediments as commonly thought, according to a new study from University of Alberta geologists. (2019-04-24)
Necrophagy: A means of survival in the Dead Sea
Researchers from UNIGE and Lyon have examined the sediments in the Dead Sea. (2019-04-15)
Unique oil-eating bacteria found in world's deepest ocean trench
Research that reveals what lies at the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean -- the Mariana Trench. (2019-04-11)
Study gives new insight into how climate change is transforming Virginia's barrier islands
A new study of Virginia's barrier islands off the coast of the Eastern Shore provides a fundamental understanding of how barrier islands will change in the near future amid a warming climate, sea-level rise and storm events such as hurricanes and nor'easters. (2019-04-09)
Otherworldly mirror pools and mesmerizing landscapes discovered on ocean floor
Scientists aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute's research vessel Falkor recently discovered and explored a hydrothermal field at 2,000 meters depth in the Gulf of California where towering mineral structures serve as biological hotspots for life. (2019-04-03)
New study measures UV-filters in seawater and corals from Hawaii
Scientists have completed the first comprehensive assessment of UV-filters in surface seawater, sediment, and coral tissue from multiple coral reefs around the island of Oahu, Hawaii. (2019-04-01)
The solid Earth breathes
The solid Earth breathes as volcanoes ''exhale'' gases like carbon dioxide (CO2) -- which are essential in regulating global climate -- while carbon ultimately from CO2 returns into the deep Earth when oceanic tectonic plates are forced to descend into the mantle at subduction zones. (2019-03-26)
Medicine and personal care products may lead to new pollutants in waterways
When you flush the toilet, you probably don't think about the traces of the medicine and personal care products in your body that are winding up in sewage treatment plants, streams, rivers, lakes, bays and the ocean. (2019-03-21)
Changes in ocean 'conveyor belt' foretold abrupt climate changes by four centuries
In the Atlantic Ocean, a giant 'conveyor belt' carries warm waters from the tropics into the North Atlantic, where they cool and sink and then return southwards in the deep ocean. (2019-03-20)
Coastal ecosystems suffer from upriver hydroelectric dams
Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and UC Riverside found that inland river dams can have highly destructive effects on the stability and productivity of coastline and estuarine habitats, which provide protection from storms, commercial fishery habitats, and belowground carbon storage. (2019-03-13)
The fiddlers influencing mangrove ecosystems
The types of bacteria living in and around fiddler crab burrows vary widely between mangroves, but their functional activities are remarkably similar. (2019-03-11)
UM researchers study Alaska forest fires over past 450 years
In a recent study, University of Montana researchers explored the ways forest succession and climate variability interacted and influenced fires in Alaska's boreal forests over the past four centuries -- from 1550 to 2015. (2019-03-05)
Drilling results reveal global climate influence on basin waters in young rifts
New results from the Gulf of Corinth, Greece, a continental rift zone where the first stage of ocean basin formation is taking place, show how the environmental conditions and sediment input into the rift basin changed as the Earth alternated between non-glaciated to glaciated conditions over the last 500 thousand years. (2019-02-28)
500-million-year old worm 'superhighway' discovered in Canada
Prehistoric worms populated the sea bed 500 million years ago--evidence that life was active in an environment thought uninhabitable until now, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows. (2019-02-28)
Toxic byproducts of Agent Orange continue to pollute Vietnam environment, study says
During the Vietnam War, United States aircraft sprayed more than 20 million gallons of herbicides, including dioxin-contaminated Agent Orange, on the country's rain forests, wetlands, and croplands. (2019-02-27)
Northwest Coast clam gardens nearly 2,000 years older than previously thought -- study
A study led by SFU archaeology professor Dana Lepofsky and Hakai Institute researcher Nicole Smith reveals that clam gardens, ancient Indigenous food security systems located along B.C.'s coast, date back at least 3,500 years -- almost 2,000 years older than previously thought. (2019-02-27)
Ancient poop helps show climate change contributed to fall of Cahokia
A new study shows climate change may have contributed to the decline of Cahokia, a famed prehistoric city near present-day St. (2019-02-25)
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