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Current Sediments News and Events, Sediments News Articles.
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New map reveals global scope of groundwater arsenic risk
Up to 220 million people worldwide, with approximately 94% of them in Asia, could be at risk of drinking well water containing harmful levels of arsenic, a tasteless, odorless and naturally occurring poison. (2020-05-21)
Measuring methane from space
A group of researchers from Alaska and Germany is reporting for the first time on remote sensing methods that can observe thousands of lakes and thus allow more precise estimates of methane emissions. (2020-05-12)
Asgard archaea including the novel phylum Gerdarchaeota participate in organic matter degradation
Asgard is an archaeal superphylum that might hold the key to understand the origin of eukaryotes, but its diversity and ecological roles remain poorly understood. (2020-05-09)
Study shows wetter climate is likely to intensify global warming
New study indicates the increase in rainfall forecast by global climate models is likely to hasten the release of carbon dioxide from tropical soils, further intensifying global warming by adding to human emissions of this greenhouse gas into Earth's atmosphere. (2020-05-06)
FSU researchers study Gulf of Mexico in international collaboration
Florida State University and partner universities investigated current baseline conditions in the southern Gulf to create a series of maps and guides that detail the distribution of carbon, nitrogen and the carbon-14 isotope. (2020-05-06)
CO2 emissions from dry inland waters globally underestimated
Inland waters play an important role in the global carbon cycle. (2020-05-01)
Window to another world: Life is bubbling up to seafloor with petroleum from deep below
Microbial life is bubbling up to the ocean floor along with fluids from deeply buried petroleum reservoirs, reports a team of scientists from the University of Calgary and the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole. (2020-05-01)
Seafloor currents may direct microplastics to biodiversity hotspots of the deep
Microplastic particles entering the sea surface were thought to settle to the seafloor directly below them, but now, a new study reveals that slow-moving currents near the bottom of the ocean direct the flow of plastics, creating microplastic hotpots in sediments of the deep sea. (2020-04-30)
Long-term consequences of coastal development as bad as an oil spill on coral reefs
Oil pollution is known to cause lethal and sublethal responses on coral communities in the short-term, but its long-term effects have not been widely studied. (2020-04-29)
Disappearing Alaskan sea ice is significant for Arctic marine ecosystem
A new study shows that plant materials originating in Arctic sea ice are significantly incorporated into marine food webs that are used for subsistence in local communities of the greater Bering Strait region. (2020-04-22)
A rapidly changing Arctic
A new study by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and their international colleagues found that freshwater runoff from rivers and continental shelf sediments are bringing significant quantities of carbon and trace elements into parts of the Arctic Ocean via the Transpolar Drift--a major surface current that moves water from Siberia across the North Pole to the North Atlantic Ocean. (2020-04-08)
New 'law' to explain how glaciers flow over soft ground
Addressing a major source of uncertainty in glacier-flow models, researchers present a new slip law to describe glaciers sliding on soft, deformable material. (2020-04-02)
Sediments may control location, magnitude of megaquakes
The world's most powerful earthquakes strike at subduction zones, areas where enormous amounts of stress build up as one tectonic plate dives beneath another. (2020-03-31)
Study challenges common view of oxygen scarcity on Earth 2 billion years ago
Geologists at University of Tartu and University of Alberta in collaboration with an international research team found evidence for elevated oxygen levels 2 billion years ago, in contradiction to previously accepted models that predict low oxygen at that time. (2020-03-24)
Microplastics found in a quarter of San Diego estuary fish
Nearly a quarter of fish collected from a San Diego stream contain microplastics. (2020-03-18)
Shifts in deep geologic structure may have magnified great 2011 Japan tsunami
Researchers say they have identified the origins of an unusual fault that probably magnified the catastrophic 2011 Japan tsunami. (2020-03-16)
A new record of deglaciations in last million years shows persistent role of obliquity pacing
Over the last million years, small variations in Earth's orbit continued to trigger and terminate global glaciations, throughout and after the Mid-Pleistocene Transition, according to a new study, which presents a novel high-resolution record of the last 11 deglaciations. (2020-03-12)
What causes an ice age to end?
Research by an international team helps to resolve some of the mystery of why ice ages end by establishing when they end. (2020-03-12)
Natural organic matter influences arsenic release into groundwater
Millions of people worldwide consume water contaminated with levels of arsenic that exceed those recommended by the World Health Organization. (2020-03-11)
Coral reefs 'weathering' the pressure of globalization
More information about the effects human activities have on Southeast Asian coral reefs has been revealed, with researchers looking at how large-scale global pressures, combined with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate pattern, can detrimentally impact these delicate marine ecosystems. (2020-03-11)
What we don't know (about lakes) could hurt us
As the power of extreme weather events increase with climate change, a team of scientists warn that lakes around the world may dramatically change, threatening ecosystem health and water quality. (2020-03-05)
New tiny 44 million year old bird fossil links Africa and Asia to Utah
A new species of quail-sized fossil bird from 44 million year old sediments in Utah fills in a gap in the fossil record of the early extinct relatives of chickens and turkeys, and it shows strong links with other extinct species from Namibia in Southern Africa and Uzbekistan in Central Asia. (2020-03-03)
Old carbon reservoirs unlikely to cause massive greenhouse gas release
As global temperatures rise, permafrost and methane hydrates -- large reservoirs of ancient carbon -- have the potential to break down, releasing enormous quantities of the potent greenhouse gas methane. (2020-02-20)
A real global player: Previously unrecognised bacteria as a key group in marine sediments
From the shoreline to the deep sea, one group of bacteria is particularly widespread in our planet's seabed: The so-called Woeseiales, which may be feeding on the protein remnants of dead cells. (2020-02-17)
Study examines the impact of oil contaminated water on tubeworms and brittlestars
A new study published by Dauphin Island Sea Lab researchers adds a new layer to understanding how an oil spill could impact marine life. (2020-02-10)
Fossil foraminifer in marine sediment reveals sea surface water temperature 800,000 years ago
Japanese researchers found that the sea surface water temperature in the northwestern Pacific fluctuated drastically from approximately 800,000 to 750,000 years ago, based on oxygen isotope analyses for fossil foraminifers from an uplifted marine succession in the Chiba composite section on Honshu Island, Japan. (2020-01-30)
Microplastics from ocean fishing can 'hide' in deep sediments
Microplastic pollution in the world's oceans is a growing problem, and most studies of the issue have focused on land-based sources, such as discarded plastic bags or water bottles. (2020-01-29)
Quo vadis Antarctic bottom water?
The formation of deep water, which is an important component of the climate system, takes place in only a few parts of the ocean: In the subpolar North Atlantic and in a few places in the Southern Hemisphere. (2020-01-22)
Climate gas budgets highly overestimate methane discharge from Arctic Ocean
There is a huge seasonal variability in methane seeps in the Arctic Ocean, according to a new paper in Nature Geoscience. (2020-01-13)
Early humans arrived in Southeast Asia later than previously believed
New dates from the World Heritage archeological site at Sangiran on the island of Java suggest that that the first appearance of Homo erectus occurred more recently than previously thought, researchers report. (2020-01-09)
Evolution: Revelatory relationship
A new study of the ecology of an enigmatic group of novel unicellular organisms by scientists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich supports the idea hydrogen played an important role in the evolution of Eukaryota, the first nucleated cells. (2019-12-27)
Solving the mystery of carbon on ocean floor
Little bits of black carbon littering the ocean floor, separate and distinct from the organic carbon believed to come from the ocean's surface. (2019-12-04)
Evidence of two quakes extends rupture history in Grand Tetons National Park
Hand-dug trenches around Leigh Lake in Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming reveal evidence for a previously unknown surface-faulting earthquake in along the Teton Fault -- one occurring about 10,000 years ago. (2019-11-19)
A study warns about the ecological impact caused by sediment accumulation in river courses
Insects, crustaceans and other water macroinvertebrates are more affected by the effect of sediment accumulation in river courses than the excess of nitrate in water environments, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE. (2019-11-13)
Scientists study impact of sediments and nutrients from Conowingo Dam on Chesapeake Bay
A new study examines the influences of a river dam on the fate of sediments and nutrients on an estuary, using the Conowingo Dam and the Chesapeake Bay as a case study. (2019-11-11)
A novel method for analyzing marine sediments contributes to paleoclimate reconstitution
Researchers supported by FAPESP proposed a procedure based on analyses of quartz and feldspar grains transported to the Atlantic Ocean by the Parnaíba River in Brazil's Northeast region. (2019-11-06)
Human activities boosted global soil erosion already 4,000 years ago
Soil erosion reduces the productivity of ecosystems, it changes nutrient cycles and it thus directly impacts climate and society. (2019-10-29)
Largest mapping of breathing ocean floor key to understanding global carbon cycle
The largest open-access database of the sediment community oxygen consumption and CO2 respiration is now available. (2019-10-29)
Mutated ferns shed light on ancient mass extinction
At the end of the Triassic around 201 million years ago, three out of four species on Earth disappeared. (2019-10-28)
The shelf life of pyrite
What exactly triggers the increase in carbon dioxide concentrations that causes the transition from a glacial stage to a warm stage is not fully understood. (2019-10-24)
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