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Current Sediments News and Events

Current Sediments News and Events, Sediments News Articles.
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Ancient Roman port history unveiled
A team of international researchers led by La Trobe University and the University of Melbourne have, for the first time worldwide, applied marine geology techniques at an ancient harbour archaeological site to uncover ancient harbour technologies of the first centuries AD. (2019-07-15)
Oldest completely preserved lily discovered
This is the conclusion of an international team of researchers led by Clement Coiffard, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin. (2019-07-11)
Paleoproterozoic dolomites elucidate the development of Precambrian marine systems
Dolomite is widely in the metal industry as a fireproof material and in construction, such as for joint grouting in panel building. (2019-07-09)
More 'reactive' land surfaces cooled the Earth down
In a new study, researchers from ETH Zurich, Stanford University the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences show that a paradigm on a global temperature drop that started around 15 million years ago cannot be upheld. (2019-07-03)
Trees for water quality credits
In a new study, UC Santa Barbara Bren School professor Arturo Keller links reforestation to water quality credits. (2019-06-27)
New research shows how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the sea
The findings of a research expedition to coastal Greenland which examined, for the first time, how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the oceans has been published in the journal Progress in Oceanography. (2019-06-25)
Scientists map huge undersea fresh-water aquifer off US Northeast
In a new survey of the sub-seafloor off the US Northeast coast, scientists have made a surprising discovery: a gigantic aquifer of relatively fresh water trapped in porous sediments lying below the salty ocean. (2019-06-21)
News from the diamond nursery
Unlike flawless gems, fibrous diamonds often contain small saline inclusions. (2019-06-19)
Marine microbiology -- Successful extremists
In nutrient-poor deep-sea sediments, microbes belonging to the Archaea have outcompeted bacterial microorganisms for millions of years. (2019-06-19)
Zipingpu Reservoir reveals climate-tectonics interplay around 2008 Wenchuan earthquake
A new study led by Prof. JIN Zhangdong from the Institute of Earth Environment (IEE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences provided a new insight on the interplay between climate and tectonics from a sediment record in the Zipingpu Reservoir around the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. (2019-06-18)
Fifty years later, DDT lingers in lake ecosystems
To control pest outbreaks, airplanes sprayed more than 6,280 tons of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) onto forests in New Brunswick, Canada, between 1952 and 1968, according to Environment Canada. (2019-06-12)
New study shows legacy of DDT to lake ecosystems
New findings of a multi-university research team show the pesticide DDT persists in remote lakes at concerning levels half a century after it was banned, affecting key aquatic species and potentially entire lake food webs. (2019-06-12)
Organic carbon hides in sediments, keeping oxygen in atmosphere
A new study from researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and Harvard University may help settle a long-standing question--how small amounts of organic carbon become locked away in rock and sediments, preventing it from decomposing. (2019-06-12)
Marine oil snow
Marine snow is the phenomena of flakes of falling organic material and biological debris cascading down a water column like snowflakes. (2019-06-11)
57% of the plastic waste on the Tarragona coast is clothing fibers from washing machines
The sea water, beaches and sediments on the Tarragona coast contain quantities of plastic similar to those in a big city like Barcelona. (2019-06-10)
Sediment from fishing choking out sea sponges, study shows
Sediment stirred up from fishing activity has a negative effect on reef-building sea sponges in northern British Columbia, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-06-06)
'Lubricating' sediments were critical in making the continents move
Plate tectonics is a key geological process on Earth, shaping its surface, making it unique among the Solar System's planets. (2019-06-05)
Glacial sediments greased the gears of plate tectonics
According to new research, the transition to plate tectonics started with the help of lubricating sediments, scraped by glaciers from the slopes of Earth's first continents. (2019-06-05)
Researchers find seaweed helps trap carbon dioxide in sediment
Florida State University researchers working with colleagues in the United Kingdom have found that these slimy macroalgae play an important role in permanently removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. (2019-06-03)
Evidence of multiple unmonitored coal ash spills found in N.C. lake
Coal ash solids in sediments collected from Sutton Lake in 2015 and 2018 suggest the North Carolina lake has been contaminated by multiple coal-ash spills, most of them apparently unmonitored and unreported. (2019-06-03)
Fossil zooplankton indicate that marine ecosystems have entered the Anthropocene
Climate change caused by humans impacts species diversity and ecosystems. (2019-05-28)
Plankton as a climate driver instead of the sun?
Fluctuations in the orbital parameters of the Earth are considered to be the trigger for long-term climatic fluctuations such as ice ages. (2019-05-22)
Scientists discovered an entirely new reason for methane venting from the Arctic Shelf
Russian scientists have discovered a previously unknown mechanism of influence of salts migration on the degradation of gigantic intra permafrost gas (methane) hydrate reserves in the Arctic Shelf. (2019-05-21)
Scientists discover evolutionary link to modern-day sea echinoderms
Scientists at The Ohio State University have discovered a new species that lived more than 500 million years ago -- a form of ancient echinoderm that was ancestral to modern-day groups such as sea cucumbers, sea urchins, sea stars, brittle stars and crinoids. (2019-05-02)
Researchers find ice feature on Saturn's giant moon
Research team finds huge ice feature on Titan while trying to understand where Saturn's largest moon gets all of its methane. (2019-04-29)
Salish seafloor mapping identifies earthquake and tsunami risks
The central Salish Sea of the Pacific Northwest is bounded by two active fault zones that could trigger rockfalls and slumps of sediment that might lead to tsunamis, according to a presentation at the 2019 SSA Annual Meeting. (2019-04-24)
Necrophagy: A means of survival in the Dead Sea
Researchers from UNIGE and Lyon have examined the sediments in the Dead Sea. (2019-04-15)
Tracking the sources of plastic pollution
Plastic pollution in the world's oceans is now widely recognized as a major global challenge -- but we still know very little about how these plastics are actually reaching the sea. (2019-04-09)
The Transpolar Drift is faltering -- sea ice is now melting before it can leave the nursery
The dramatic loss of ice in the Arctic is influencing sea-ice transport across the Arctic Ocean. (2019-04-02)
The solid Earth breathes
The solid Earth breathes as volcanoes ''exhale'' gases like carbon dioxide (CO2) -- which are essential in regulating global climate -- while carbon ultimately from CO2 returns into the deep Earth when oceanic tectonic plates are forced to descend into the mantle at subduction zones. (2019-03-26)
ANU scientists solve mystery shrouding oldest animal fossils
Scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) have discovered that 558 million-year-old Dickinsonia fossils do not reveal all of the features of the earliest known animals, which potentially had mouths and guts. (2019-03-25)
The struggle for life in the Dead Sea sediments: Necrophagy as a survival mechanism
The Dead Sea is not completely dead. The most saline lake on Earth (more than 10 times saltier than sea water) is a harsh environment where only salt-loving microbes from the Archaea domain, known as extreme halophiles, are able to survive. (2019-03-25)
The largest delta plain in Earth's history
The largest delta plain in Earth's history formed along the northern coast of the supercontinent Pangea in the late Triassic. (2019-03-25)
Hundreds of bubble streams link biology, seismology off Washington's coast
The first survey of methane vent sites off Washington's coast finds 1,778 bubble columns, with most located along a north-south band that is in line with a geologic fault. (2019-03-21)
Better water testing, safer produce
Irrigation water's E. coli results can differ between labs, test types. (2019-03-20)
New wallaby-sized dinosaur from the ancient Australian-Antarctic rift valley
A new, wallaby-sized herbivorous dinosaur has been identified from five fossilized upper jaws in 125-million-year-old rocks from the Cretaceous period of Victoria, southeastern Australia. (2019-03-11)
Toxic byproducts of Agent Orange continue to pollute Vietnam environment, study says
During the Vietnam War, United States aircraft sprayed more than 20 million gallons of herbicides, including dioxin-contaminated Agent Orange, on the country's rain forests, wetlands, and croplands. (2019-02-27)
A rare assemblage of sharks and rays from nearshore environments of Eocene Madagascar
Eocene-aged sediments of Madagascar contain a previously unknown fauna of sharks and rays, according to a study released Feb. (2019-02-27)
Ancient poop helps show climate change contributed to fall of Cahokia
A new study shows climate change may have contributed to the decline of Cahokia, a famed prehistoric city near present-day St. (2019-02-25)
130,000 years of data show peatlands store carbon long-term
An international team of scientists has become the first to conduct a study of global peatland extent and carbon stocks through the last interglacial-glacial cycle 130,000 years ago to the present. (2019-02-25)
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