Current Sepsis News and Events

Current Sepsis News and Events, Sepsis News Articles.
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Compound for Alzheimer's combats bacterial resistance to last-resort antibiotics in mice
An experimental drug for neurodegenerative diseases can also reverse resistance to ''last-resort'' polymyxin antibiotics among bacteria that cause sepsis, a life-threatening complication from infections. (2020-11-18)

In the lab, St. Jude scientists identify possible COVID-19 treatment
Immunologists have determined the process driving life-threatening inflammation, lung damage and organ failure in patients with COVID-19, sepsis and other inflammatory disorders suggesting possible treatment using existing drugs. (2020-11-18)

Antidepressant may prevent severe COVID-19, trial suggests
The antidepressant fluvoxamine appears to prevent COVID-19 infections from worsening and may help keep patients out of the hospital, a trial based on research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests. (2020-11-13)

Collecting sperm from Covid-19 patients
How does Covid-19 affect sperm and thus the next generation´s immune system? Norwegian researchers are collecting sperm to find the answer. (2020-10-30)

New tricks for old antibiotics
The study published in the journal Immunity reveals that tetracyclines (broad spectre antibiotics), by partially inhibiting cell mitochondria activity, induce a compensatory response on the organism that decreases tissue damage caused during infection. This finding opens new doors in the field of disease tolerance and positions this group of antibiotics as potential adjuvant treatment for sepsis, due to their effects that go beyond the control of bacterial burden. (2020-10-22)

Protein that keeps immune system from freaking out could form basis for new therapeutics
Treatment with a peptide that mimics the naturally occurring protein GIV prevents immune overreaction and supports a mechanism critical for survival in mouse models of sepsis and colitis, according to a UC San Diego study. (2020-10-14)

Penn Medicine scientists engineer bacteria-killing molecules from wasp venom
A team led by scientists in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has engineered powerful new antimicrobial molecules from toxic proteins found in wasp venom. The team hopes to develop the molecules into new bacteria-killing drugs, an important advancement considering increasing numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. (2020-10-12)

Study reveals element in blood is part of human--and hibernating squirrel--stress response
A new study published in the journal Critical Care Explorations shows for the first time that part of the stress response in people and animals involves increasing the levels of a naturally circulating element in blood. The discovery demonstrates a biological mechanism that rapidly responds to severe physiologic stress and potentially serves to protect us from further damage due to life-threatening conditions. (2020-10-01)

Negative pressure wound therapy does not cut infection risk in obese women after cesarean
Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) does not appear to lower the risk of infection for obese women after cesarean delivery, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The treatment involves placing a low-pressure pump over a closed surgical wound to create negative air pressure. (2020-09-22)

4TEEN4's first-in-class therapeutic antibody Procizumab restores heart function in life-threatening cardiac depression induced by sepsis
4TEEN4 reports on the efficacy of Procizumab in a preclinical model of sepsis (2020-09-16)

Online tool informs recovery prospects for sepsis survivors
A doctor at Guy's and St Thomas', working with colleagues at the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC), has developed a tool to predict the risk of readmission to hospital or death in the first year after leaving hospital for adult survivors of sepsis. (2020-09-15)

Early steroids improve outcomes in patients with septic shock
Some critically ill patients with septic shock need medications called vasopressors to correct dangerously low blood pressure. When high doses of vasopressors are needed or blood pressure isn't responding well, the steroid hydrocortisone is often used. In this situation, earlier treatment with hydrocortisone reduces the risk of death and other adverse outcomes, reports a study in SHOCK®: Injury, Inflammation, and Sepsis: Laboratory and Clinical Approaches, Official Journal of the Shock Society. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-09-14)

Cell-autonomous immunity shaped human evolution
Every human cell harbors its own defenses against microbial invaders, relying on strategies that date back to some of the earliest events in the history of life, researchers report. Because this ''cell-autonomous immunity'' is so ancient and persistent, understanding it is essential to understanding human evolution and human medicine, the researchers said. (2020-09-09)

SphingoTec's kidney function biomarker penKid® accurately detects acute kidney injury in infants
penKid® (Proenkephalin), a unique biomarker for the real-time assessment of kidney function. Novel data now demonstrate that penKid® also accurately predicts acute kidney injury in infants and provides substantial additional value on top of the diagnostic standard of care. (2020-08-27)

Patient monitoring systems for sepsis - mixed results on patient outcomes
Automated patient monitoring systems (PMSs) have been designed to reduce delays in diagnosis of sepsis in hospitalized patients. But so far, studies evaluating these systems have shown inconsistent effects on mortality rates and other patient outcomes, according to an evidence review in a special September supplement to the Journal of Patient Safety, which was funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-08-24)

Quieting the storm
Experiments show acupuncture modulates inflammation in mice. Findings reveal site, intensity and timing of acupuncture affect disease course. Results can inform efforts to use acupuncture for treatment of human diseases marked by aberrant inflammation. (2020-08-12)

The yin and yang of inflammation controlled by a single molecule
Penn Study Reveals A Molecular Mechanism That Helps The Body Mount Perfectly Balanced Responses to Deadly Infections (2020-08-05)

Risk of sepsis greatest for patients with frailty, older age or urinary tract infections
Patients with frailty, older age and urinary tract infections (UTIs) are at greatest risk of developing sepsis following infection consultations in primary care, research has found. (2020-07-24)

Elevated levels of a specific protein found to correlate with inflammatory symptom severity in COVID
A new study found raised levels of transforming growth factor beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) in blood sampled from roughly 100 people hospitalized for COVID-19, and further found that elevated levels of (2020-07-24)

Increasing rates of preventable hospitalizations among adults with dementia
A team of investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has found that in recent years, increasing numbers of these hospitalizations were for conditions for which hospitalization can often be avoided with improvements in outpatient care. (2020-07-23)

Common childhood vaccine might prevent severe complications of COVID-19
A paper published by LSU Health New Orleans and Tulane University School of Medicine researchers suggests that live attenuated vaccines such as MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) may prevent the severe lung inflammation and sepsis associated with COVID-19 infection. (2020-06-26)

Race, rurality play prominently in Georgia areas hardest hit by COVID-19
While counties in populous metropolitan Atlanta had the highest number of COVID-19 cases in the initial weeks following Georgia's first reported case, it was rural Southwest Georgia counties, with a higher number of black residents and lower number of ICU beds, experiencing the highest rates of infection and death per capita, investigators report. (2020-06-25)

Hormone involved in obesity is a risk factor for sepsis
A group of scientists from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC), led by Luís Moita, discovered that a hormone that has been pointed out as a treatment for obesity reduces the resistance to infection caused by bacteria and is a risk factor for sepsis. (2020-06-22)

MMR vaccine could protect against the worst symptoms of COVID-19
Administering the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine could serve as a preventive measure to dampen septic inflammation associated with COVID-19 infection, say a team of experts in this week's mBio, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2020-06-19)

Antihypotensive agent disrupts the immune system in sepsis
Patients who go into shock caused by sepsis (septic shock) are treated with the antihypotensive agent norepinephrine. Researchers from Radboud university medical center published results in today's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine revealing that its use is not without drawbacks: the drug disrupts the immune system and increases susceptibility to infections. This may have negative consequences for patients. Research into alternatives is therefore justified. (2020-06-11)

Small protein, big impact
In meningococci, the RNA-binding protein ProQ plays a major role. Together with RNA molecules, it regulates processes that are important for pathogenic properties of the bacteria. (2020-06-04)

New testing system predicts septic shock outcomes
PME professor Savas Tay and his collaborators have developed a new, extremely sensitive method that can quantify bacteria, an antibiotic resistant gene, and immune molecule levels within sepsis patients, far more rapidly than current protocols. (2020-05-26)

The cardiac depressant factor DPP3 is predicting organ failure in burn patients
High DPP3 blood concentrations are indicating multiple organ failure and poor outcomes. sphingotec commercializes a rapid CE-IVD test for DPP3 on its proprietary point-of-care platform Nexus IB10. (2020-05-14)

Indicators of infection response do not predict severity of pneumonia in children
Blood biomarkers that reflect the body's response to infection -- including white blood cell count, absolute neutrophil count, C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin -- are generally not useful in predicting the overall severity of community-acquired pneumonia in children, according to a study published in Pediatrics. (2020-05-13)

Better antibiotic dosing could save lives in ICU
More lives could be saved in intensive care units around the world if new antibiotic guidelines designed by The University of Queensland are adopted. (2020-05-08)

Researchers unlock TB vaccine puzzle in findings that could save millions of newborns
An international research team has identified the mechanism behind one of science's most enduring mysteries: what makes the 100-year-old tuberculosis (TB) vaccine so effective at preventing newborn deaths from diseases other than TB? (2020-05-06)

To prevent antimicrobial resistance, vaccinate the world's kids
Childhood vaccination may be a powerful tool in the fight against antimicrobial resistance in low- and middle-income countries, finds a new analysis led by researchers University of California, Berkeley. The study found that immunization with two common vaccines -- the pneumococcal conjugate and rotavirus vaccines -- significantly reduces the rates of acute respiratory infections and diarrhea among small children in these settings. And, with fewer children getting sick or severely sick, fewer are receiving antibiotic treatment. (2020-04-29)

Protein produced in sepsis lowers blood pressure, treatment identified to reverse effects
Temple scientists show that when a molecule known as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) becomes active in sepsis, it increases the production of a protein called B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) -- the more BNP that is produced in sepsis, the greater the deterioration of cardiovascular function. But perhaps more significantly, in mice, the researchers show that JNK and BNP activity can be halted, reversing cardiovascular damage and reducing the risk of death from sepsis. (2020-04-23)

Milestone for the early detection of sepsis
Researchers from Graz, Austria, are developing a ground-breaking method that uses biomarkers to detect sepsis 2 to 3 days before the first clinical symptoms appear. This can significantly increase the chances of survival in cases of blood poisoning by bacteria or fungi. (2020-04-21)

Study of sewage finds link between different rates of sepsis in UK and presence of E. coli in the community
A study to be presented at European Congress on Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) shows that rates of Escherichia coli related sepsis in different regions of the UK could be directly linked to the levels of pathogenic (disease-causing) E. coli in the community, as determined by its presence in sewage in that area. (2020-04-17)

An antibody treatment combats life-threatening sepsis in rodents
Sepsis -- the body's extreme and organ-damaging response to severe infections -- is a major contributor to death in patients battling infectious disease. (2020-04-15)

Calculating early warning scores before they reach hospital can help the sickest patients
Recording National Early Warning Scores (NEWS) when a patient is urgently referred to hospital can improve the process of care for the sickest patients and reduce the time taken to get to hospital, according to a NIHR- funded study at the University of Bristol published in the BJGP today [7 April]. National Early Warning Scores help clinicians recognise when patients are at risk of deterioration, for example as a result of infection such as sepsis. (2020-04-07)

An affordable and fast clinical test that can save human lives and spares at-risk population
LAL is an essential biotech resource for sterility testing of medical devices, but harvesting horseshoe crabs from the ocean to produce it puts pressure on vulnerable animal populations. In a new study, researchers have developed an animal-friendly, sustainable aquaculture method that yields an extra-potent LAL that can check for sepsis-causing bacteria and fungi in human blood. (2020-04-01)

Guidelines on caring for ICU patients with COVID-19
An international team including McMaster University researchers has come together to issue guidelines for health-care workers treating intensive care unit (ICU) patients with COVID-19. (2020-04-01)

New guidelines on caring for ICU patients with COVID-19
An international team including McMaster University researchers has come together to issue guidelines for health-care workers treating intensive care unit (ICU) patients with COVID-19. (2020-04-01)

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