Nav: Home

Current Siblings News and Events

Current Siblings News and Events, Siblings News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 19 | 757 Results
Bloodlines may matter more than love when it comes to health
Strained relationships with parents, siblings or extended family members may be more harmful to people's health than a troubled relationship with a significant other, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-11-07)
Which came first: Brain size or drinking propensity?
Contrary to the belief that drinking can literally shrink one's brain, a new study that includes researchers from Arts & Sciences suggests that a small brain might be a risk factor for heavier alcohol consumption. (2019-10-28)
New study debunks myth that only children are more narcissistic than kids with siblings
The stereotype that only children are selfish, or more self-centered than those with siblings is sometimes used as an argument for having more than one child, but researchers from Germany find there's no evidence for the claim that only children are more narcissistic than children with sibling. (2019-10-15)
Children bullied by friends and siblings are more likely to think about suicide in their early 20s
Depression, self-harm and suicidal ideation are more prominent in adults in their early twenties if they were bullied at home and at school, a study by researchers at the University of Warwick have found. (2019-10-09)
UBC study finds siblings of problem gamblers also impulsive, prone to risk-taking
Biological siblings of people with gambling disorder also display markers of increased impulsivity and risk-taking, according to a new UBC psychology study. (2019-10-09)
Ethiopian parents can't make up for effects of life shocks on children by spending more on education
Ethiopian parents try to level out the life chances least-advantaged children affected by early life shocks such as famine and low rainfall levels by investing more in their education. (2019-10-07)
Having an elder brother is associated with slower language development
Several studies had already demonstrated that children who have an elder sibling have poorer linguistic performance than those who have none. (2019-09-05)
Kids in neighbourhoods with larger households less likely to be killed in house fires
There is safety in numbers. That's one of the key findings of a study published today in CMAJ Open that found a child's risk of death or injury in a residential fire was greatly reduced in neighborhoods with larger than average households. (2019-09-04)
Kids from disadvantaged neighborhoods more likely to be obese as adults
Children who grow up in disadvantaged neighborhoods are nearly one-third more likely to experience obesity as adults, according to new research from Cornell University. (2019-08-27)
Multiple-birth infants have higher risk of medical mixups in NICU
Multiple-birth infants had a significantly higher risk of wrong-patient order errors compared with singletons in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. (2019-08-26)
Mayo Clinic study calls for screening of family members of celiac disease patients
Parents, siblings and children of people with celiac disease are at high risk of also having the disease, according to a Mayo Clinic study. (2019-08-22)
Is childhood-onset of IBD associated with risk of psychiatric disorders, suicide attempt?
Data from Swedish national registers were used to examine the risk of psychiatric disorders and suicide attempt in individuals diagnosed as children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared with people in the general population and with siblings of patients with IBD. (2019-08-19)
Increased risk of psychiatric disorders in children with IBD
Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) run a greater risk of psychiatric disorders, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in JAMA Pediatrics. (2019-08-19)
Students with a greater sense of school belonging are less likely to become bullies
Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that students who feel a greater sense of belonging with their peers, family and school community are less likely to become bullies. (2019-07-30)
Study finds children with autism more likely to be bullied at home and at school
A major new study has found children with autism are more likely to be bullied by both their siblings and their peers, meaning that when they return from school, they have no respite from victimization. (2019-07-21)
Loneliness heightened among gay men in certain age group in China
Gay men in China ages 25-29 are eight times more likely to feel criticized and rejected compared with men in that country ages 20 or younger, new research shows. (2019-07-10)
Solitude breeds aggression in spiders (rather than vice versa)
Spiders start out social but later turn aggressive after dispersing and becoming solitary, according to a study publishing July 2 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Raphael Jeanson of the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) in France, and colleagues. (2019-07-02)
MS patients at a greater risk of cancer, new study suggests
New results of a 65-year follow-up study of nearly 7,000 Norwegian patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) suggest that patients may have a greater overall risk of developing cancer than the general population, with an especially high risk of cancer in respiratory organs, urinary organs and the central nervous system. (2019-06-29)
Survivors of childhood brain tumors experience lasting cognitive and socioeconomic burdens
Survivors of childhood brain tumors who received radiotherapy and were very young at the time of diagnosis may experience cognitive and socioeconomic burdens decades after treatment, according to a study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. (2019-06-24)
Farm-like indoor microbiota may protect children from asthma also in urban homes
A child's risk of developing asthma is the lower the more the microbiota of the child's home resembles that of a farm house. (2019-06-17)
Sexual-orientation study
A new study from Professor Doug VanderLaan's lab in UofT Mississauga's Department of Psychology looking at biological mechanisms that are often thought to influence male sexual orientation was published in the latest edition of PNAS. (2019-06-10)
Fathers aid development of larger brains
The bigger the brain, the more intelligent a mammalian species is. (2019-06-03)
Surprisingly, inbred isle royale wolves dwindle because of fewer harmful genes
The tiny, isolated gray wolf population on Isle Royale has withered to near-extinction, but not because each animal carries a large number of harmful genes, according to a new genetic analysis. (2019-05-29)
Bacteria use their enemy -- phage -- for 'self-recognition'
Scientists discovered that cells can distinguish themselves from closely related competitors through the use of a virus, and the harboring of phage in bacterial genomes benefits host cells when facing competitors in the environment. (2019-04-22)
Resolving sex differences in psychiatric disorder risk
Male and female rats whose mother experienced a simulated viral infection during pregnancy display autism- and schizophrenia-like behaviors, according to a new follow-up study published in eNeuro. (2019-04-15)
Stress-related disorders linked to heightened risk of cardiovascular disease
Stress-related disorders -- conditions triggered by a significant life event or trauma -- may be linked to a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), finds a large Swedish study published in The BMJ today. (2019-04-10)
Milk or no milk? Study fills long-time knowledge gap on babies with genetic disorder
A new study co-authored by a Washington State University researcher finally brings clarity to parents of children with Duarte galactosemia, a milder variant of a genetic disorder that impairs the body's ability to process a milk sugar known as galactose. (2019-03-19)
Nature hits rewind
The study of evolution is revealing new complexities, showing how the traits most beneficial to the fitness of individual plants and animals are not always the ones we see in nature. (2019-03-19)
Mysterious males: Asexual female nematodes produce males for sperm, not genes
Getting at why nematodes engaged in a unique female-favoring reproduction strategy produce males at all, researchers report that the asexual females produce limited numbers of male offspring to exploit them for their sperm in order to make more males, and in a ratio meaning the resultant sons are more likely to mate with their sisters. (2019-03-14)
Having great-grandparents, cousins with Alzheimer's linked to higher risk
Having a parent with Alzheimer's disease has been known to raise a person's risk of developing the disease, but new research suggests that having second- and third-degree relatives who have had Alzheimer's may also increase risk. (2019-03-13)
Early life stress alters helping behavior of meerkat offspring
Parents make sacrifices to allow their children to have better lives than they did, but this isn't the case for Kalahari meerkat mothers, according to a new University of Michigan study. (2019-02-25)
Some personal beliefs and morals may stem from genetics
Penn State researchers found that while parents can help encourage their children to develop into responsible, conscientious adults, there is an underlying genetic factor that influences these traits, as well. (2019-02-25)
'Old' sperm produces healthier offspring
Research shows that sperm that live for longer before fertilising an egg produce healthier offspring. (2019-02-14)
The more the merrier? Children with multiple siblings more susceptible to bullying
A child with more than one brother or sister is more likely to be the victim of sibling bullying than those with only one sibling, and firstborn children and older brothers tend to be the perpetrators, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-02-14)
Study examines association between birth weight, risk of developing psychiatric disorders in adulthood
It is unclear if the associations between fetal growth as indicated by birth weight and later mental health conditions remain after taking into account family-related factors that could affect these conditions. (2019-02-06)
Imperceptible movements guide juvenile zebra finch song development
New research from Cornell University shows zebra finches engage in socially guided vocal learning, where they learn their songs by watching their mothers' reactions to their immature songs. (2019-01-31)
Medically assisted reproduction does not raise risk of preterm birth and low birth weight
Study shows that couples can decide about using medically assisted reproduction free from concerns about increasing the health risks to their baby. (2019-01-14)
Fighting another virus? Blame your parents
Genetics may play a bigger role in the body's disease-fighting ability than scientists previously thought, according to the results from a new study of twins in Queensland, Australia. (2019-01-08)
Study examines development of physical aggression in children as they age
Children can exhibit physical aggression when they are very young but that behavior typically declines before and during elementary school. (2018-12-28)
High survival rate among children who have suffered from growth restriction
Almost all children live to see their eighteenth birthday despite a severe growth restriction, as long as they have survived their first month during infancy. (2018-12-18)
Page 1 of 19 | 757 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#541 Wayfinding
These days when we want to know where we are or how to get where we want to go, most of us will pull out a smart phone with a built-in GPS and map app. Some of us old timers might still use an old school paper map from time to time. But we didn't always used to lean so heavily on maps and technology, and in some remote places of the world some people still navigate and wayfind their way without the aid of these tools... and in some cases do better without them. This week, host Rachelle Saunders...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.