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Penn researchers identify new genetic cause of a form of inherited neuropathy
Inherited mutations in a gene that keeps nerve cells intact was shown, for the first time, to be a driver of a neuropathy known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. (2020-08-03)
Therapy helps children with food allergies manage severe anxiety
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has launched the Food Allergy Bravery (FAB) Clinic to help children with a phobia of anaphylaxis. (2020-07-28)
Loss of a co-twin linked to heightened psychiatric risk
The death of a twin, especially earlier in life, can increase the risk of their surviving twin being diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder, finds a new study published today in eLife. (2020-07-14)
About nine family members to suffer grief from every COVID-19 fatality
Deaths from COVID-19 will have a ripple effect causing impacts on the mental health and health of surviving family members. (2020-07-13)
Autism risk estimated at 3 to 5% for children whose parents have a sibling with autism
Roughly 3 to 5% of children with an aunt or uncle with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can also be expected to have ASD, compared to about 1.5% of children in the general population, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. (2020-05-18)
New review of studies shows no link between prenatal antidepressant exposure and autism
A mother's use of antidepressants during pregnancy does not appear to increase her child's risk for autism, according to a new meta-analysis by Jeffrey Newport, M.D., published in the American Journal of Psychiatry. (2020-05-07)
A child's home environment can impact the risk of developing depression
New research, published online today in the American Journal of Psychiatry, finds that children's rearing environment has a meaningful impact on their risk for major depression later in life, and notes the importance supporting of nurturing environments when children are at risk. (2020-04-28)
Mount Sinai researchers unveil mechanisms to prevent Crohn's disease
In a series of four studies published today in Gastroenterology, a journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, Mount Sinai inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) researchers, describe the identification of predictive tools and a new understanding of environmental factors that trigger IBD. (2020-03-26)
University of Miami researchers find an early behavioral marker for autism
Many babies cry or show other signs of distress when a parent departs and they are left behind with a stranger. (2020-03-13)
Genes tell a story about diabetic kidney disease
Studying Finnish genes leads to unique revelations about the development of a serious complication of diabetes, and informs an ongoing genomic study of a Singaporean cohort as part of Singapore's Diabetes Study in Nephropathy and other Microvascular Complications (DYNAMO). (2020-03-12)
Not falling far from tree: Ecologists study seed-to-seedling transitions
Ecologists studying spatial patterns of seeds and surviving seedlings among trees on Panama's Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Forest Dynamics Plot on Barro Colorado Island observed the Hubbell pattern: A large number of seedlings survived under parent trees compared to far away. (2020-02-27)
Weight-based bullying linked to increased adolescent alcohol, marijuana us
Adolescents who are bullied about their weight or body shape may be more likely to use alcohol or marijuana than those who are not bullied, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-02-25)
Autism eye scan could lead to early detection
A new eye scan could help identify autism in children years earlier than currently possible. (2020-02-20)
Some antibiotics prescribed during pregnancy linked with birth defects
Children of mothers prescribed macrolide antibiotics during early pregnancy are at an increased risk of major birth defects, particularly heart defects, compared with children of mothers prescribed penicillin, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-02-19)
30-year study identifies need of disease-modifying therapies for maple syrup urine disease
A new study analyzes 30 years of patient data and details the clinical course of 184 individuals with genetically diverse forms of Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD), which is among the most volatile and dangerous inherited metabolic disorders. (2020-01-24)
Siblings of children with intellectual disabilities score high on empathy and closeness
A new Tel Aviv University and University of Haifa study finds that relationships between children and their siblings with intellectual disabilities are more positive than those between typically developing siblings. (2020-01-14)
Genetic testing provides insights to sudden unexplained deaths in Amish community
Using an exome molecular autopsy, Michael Ackerman, M.D., Ph.D., and his associates conducted genetic testing of four siblings who each died suddenly during exercise. (2020-01-08)
The mysterious case of the ornamented coot chicks has a surprising explanation
The American coot is a somewhat drab water bird with gray and black feathers and a white beak, common in wetlands throughout North America. (2019-12-30)
Children born preterm are more likely to be placed outside the home
Children born prematurely, i.e. before week 37, are more likely to be placed outside the home as a supportive child welfare measure than their full-term counterparts, according to a population study conducted by the Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL). (2019-12-27)
Leaving home is beneficial for male squirrels but not for females, study shows
In the world of squirrels, moving away from your home turf has better outcomes for males than for females, according to a new study by University of Alberta ecologists. (2019-12-13)
Genome testing for siblings of kids with autism may detect ASD before symptoms appear
One of the key priorities of interventions for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is starting early, with some evidence showing infants as young as seven months old could benefit. (2019-12-05)
Preterm birth linked to increased rates of diabetes in children and young adults, with certain effects stronger in females
New research shows that preterm birth is linked to increased rates of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in children and young adults, with certain effects stronger in females. (2019-12-05)
Police killings of unarmed black Americans may have health impacts for nearby unborn black infants
Pregnant black women give birth to infants with smaller birth weights and shorter gestational ages if they live near the site of incidents in which unarmed blacks are killed by police during their first or second trimester, according to a new study. (2019-12-04)
Choking deaths in US children drop by 75% in past 50 years
Children's deaths from choking on small objects dropped by 75% from 1968 to 2017, according to a report published in JAMA. (2019-11-26)
Bloodlines may matter more than love when it comes to health
Strained relationships with parents, siblings or extended family members may be more harmful to people's health than a troubled relationship with a significant other, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-11-07)
Which came first: Brain size or drinking propensity?
Contrary to the belief that drinking can literally shrink one's brain, a new study that includes researchers from Arts & Sciences suggests that a small brain might be a risk factor for heavier alcohol consumption. (2019-10-28)
New study debunks myth that only children are more narcissistic than kids with siblings
The stereotype that only children are selfish, or more self-centered than those with siblings is sometimes used as an argument for having more than one child, but researchers from Germany find there's no evidence for the claim that only children are more narcissistic than children with sibling. (2019-10-15)
Children bullied by friends and siblings are more likely to think about suicide in their early 20s
Depression, self-harm and suicidal ideation are more prominent in adults in their early twenties if they were bullied at home and at school, a study by researchers at the University of Warwick have found. (2019-10-09)
UBC study finds siblings of problem gamblers also impulsive, prone to risk-taking
Biological siblings of people with gambling disorder also display markers of increased impulsivity and risk-taking, according to a new UBC psychology study. (2019-10-09)
Ethiopian parents can't make up for effects of life shocks on children by spending more on education
Ethiopian parents try to level out the life chances least-advantaged children affected by early life shocks such as famine and low rainfall levels by investing more in their education. (2019-10-07)
Having an elder brother is associated with slower language development
Several studies had already demonstrated that children who have an elder sibling have poorer linguistic performance than those who have none. (2019-09-05)
Kids in neighbourhoods with larger households less likely to be killed in house fires
There is safety in numbers. That's one of the key findings of a study published today in CMAJ Open that found a child's risk of death or injury in a residential fire was greatly reduced in neighborhoods with larger than average households. (2019-09-04)
Kids from disadvantaged neighborhoods more likely to be obese as adults
Children who grow up in disadvantaged neighborhoods are nearly one-third more likely to experience obesity as adults, according to new research from Cornell University. (2019-08-27)
Multiple-birth infants have higher risk of medical mixups in NICU
Multiple-birth infants had a significantly higher risk of wrong-patient order errors compared with singletons in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. (2019-08-26)
Mayo Clinic study calls for screening of family members of celiac disease patients
Parents, siblings and children of people with celiac disease are at high risk of also having the disease, according to a Mayo Clinic study. (2019-08-22)
Is childhood-onset of IBD associated with risk of psychiatric disorders, suicide attempt?
Data from Swedish national registers were used to examine the risk of psychiatric disorders and suicide attempt in individuals diagnosed as children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared with people in the general population and with siblings of patients with IBD. (2019-08-19)
Increased risk of psychiatric disorders in children with IBD
Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) run a greater risk of psychiatric disorders, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in JAMA Pediatrics. (2019-08-19)
Students with a greater sense of school belonging are less likely to become bullies
Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that students who feel a greater sense of belonging with their peers, family and school community are less likely to become bullies. (2019-07-30)
Study finds children with autism more likely to be bullied at home and at school
A major new study has found children with autism are more likely to be bullied by both their siblings and their peers, meaning that when they return from school, they have no respite from victimization. (2019-07-21)
Loneliness heightened among gay men in certain age group in China
Gay men in China ages 25-29 are eight times more likely to feel criticized and rejected compared with men in that country ages 20 or younger, new research shows. (2019-07-10)
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