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Predictive model reveals function of promising energy harvester device
A small energy harvesting device that can transform subtle mechanical vibrations into electrical energy could be used to power wireless sensors and actuators for use in anything from temperature and occupancy monitoring in smart environments, to biosensing within the human body. (2020-10-29)
Order in the disorder:
For the first time, a team at HZB has identified the atomic substructure of amorphous silicon with a resolution of 0.8 nanometres using X-ray and neutron scattering at BESSY II and BER II. (2020-10-29)
A question of affinity
A collaboration of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Germany and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia have recently scrutinized organic solar cells and derived design rules for light-absorbing dyes that can help to make these cells more efficient, while tailoring the absorption spectrum of the cells to the needs of the chosen application. (2020-10-27)
A blast of gas for better solar cells
Treating silicon with carbon dioxide gas in plasma processing brings simplicity and control to a key step for making solar cells. (2020-10-26)
A new way of looking at the Earth's interior
Current understanding is that the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle is relatively homogeneous. (2020-10-21)
Detecting early-stage failure in electric power conversion devices
Researchers from Osaka University used acoustic emission during power cycling tests to monitor in real time the complete failure process--from the earliest stages--in silicon carbide Schottsky diodes. (2020-10-19)
Surrey is leading the way in perovskite tandem solar cells
Scientists from the University of Surrey have revealed the significant improvements they are making in perovskite-based solar cells. (2020-10-16)
What laser color do you like?
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland have developed a microchip technology that can convert invisible near-infrared laser light into any one of a panoply of visible laser colors, including red, orange, yellow and green. (2020-10-14)
Controlling the speed of enzyme motors brings biomedical applications of nanorobots closer
A new study, published in the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition, describes a tool for modulating nanomotors powered by enzymes, broadening their potential biomedical and environmental applications. (2020-10-13)
Surface waves can help nanostructured devices keep their cool
A research team led by The Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo demonstrated that hybrid surface waves called surface phonon-polaritons provide enhanced thermal conductivity in nanoscale membranes. (2020-10-12)
SNew solar panel design could lead to wider use of renewable energy
Researchers say the breakthrough could lead to the production of thinner, lighter and more flexible solar panels that could be used to power more homes and be used in a wider range of products. (2020-10-08)
Silence, please: UNSW scientists create quietest semiconductor quantum bits on record
Researchers at UNSW Sydney have demonstrated the lowest noise level on record for a semiconductor quantum bit, or qubit. (2020-10-08)
Multi-institutional team extracts more energy from sunlight with advanced solar panels
Researchers working to maximize solar panel efficiency said layering advanced materials atop traditional silicon is a promising path to eke more energy out of sunlight. (2020-10-06)
Metal wires of carbon complete toolbox for carbon-based computers
Carbon-based computers have the potential to be a lot faster and much more energy efficient than silicon-based computers, but 2D graphene and carbon nanotubes have proved challenging to turn into the elements needed to construct transistor circuits. (2020-09-24)
Nanocrystals make volcanoes explode
Tiny crystals, ten thousand times thinner than a human hair, can cause explosive volcanic eruptions. (2020-09-24)
Parylene photonics enable future optical biointerfaces
Carnegie Mellon University's Maysam Chamanzar and his team have invented an optical platform that will likely become the new standard in optical biointerfaces. (2020-09-22)
What happens between the sheets?
Adding calcium to graphene creates an extremely-promising superconductor, but where does the calcium go? (2020-09-17)
Liquid water at 170 degrees Celsius
Using the X-ray laser European XFEL, a research team has investigated how water heats up under extreme conditions. (2020-09-16)
Researchers have developed the world's smallest ultrasound detector
Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed the world's smallest ultrasound detector. (2020-09-16)
Single photons from a silicon chip
Quantum technology holds great promise: Quantum computers are expected to revolutionize database searches, AI systems, and computational simulations. (2020-09-15)
Tandem devices feel the heat
Researchers develop a better understanding of how novel solar cells developed in the lab will operate under real conditions. (2020-09-14)
Carbon-rich exoplanets may be made of diamonds
In a new study published recently in The Planetary Science Journal, a team of researchers from Arizona State University and the University of Chicago have determined that some carbon-rich exoplanets, given the right circumstances, could be made of diamonds and silica. (2020-09-11)
Scientists have discovered an environmentally friendly way to transform silicon into nanoparticles
Scientists have developed a new method of silicon recycling. The majority of solar panels that are produced in ever-increasing quantities use silicon. (2020-09-08)
Nanoearthquakes control spin centers in SiC
Researchers from the Paul-Drude-Institut in Berlin, the Helmholtz-Zentrum in Dresden and the Ioffe Institute in St. (2020-09-04)
New technology lets quantum bits hold information for 10,000 times longer than previous record
Quantum bits, or qubits, can hold quantum information much longer now thanks to efforts by an international research team. (2020-09-04)
CU scientists create batteries that could make it easier to explore Mars
Electrifying research by Clemson University scientists could lead to the creation of lighter, faster-charging batteries suitable for powering a spacesuit, or even a Mars rover. (2020-08-31)
Microscopic robots 'walk' thanks to laser tech
A Cornell University-led collaboration has created the first microscopic robots that incorporate semiconductor components, allowing them to be controlled - and made to walk - with standard electronic signals. (2020-08-26)
Stanford scientists slow and steer light with resonant nanoantennas
Researchers have fashioned ultrathin silicon nanoantennas that trap and redirect light, for applications in quantum computing, LIDAR and even the detection of viruses. (2020-08-20)
2D materials for ultrascaled field-effect transistors
Since the discovery of graphene, two-dimensional materials have been the focus of materials research. (2020-08-17)
Perovskite and organic solar cells prove successful on a rocket flight in space
Almost all satellites are powered by solar cells - but solar cells are heavy. (2020-08-13)
Coffee stains inspire optimal printing technique for electronics
Using an alcohol mixture, researchers modified how ink droplets dry, enabling cheap industrial-scale printing of electronic devices at unprecedented scales. (2020-08-12)
Giant photothermoelectric effect in silicon nanoribbon photodetectors
The photoelectric conversion has essential applications in energy and information devices. (2020-08-11)
Tiniest secrets of integrated circuits revealed with new imaging technique
The secrets of the tiniest active structures in integrated circuits can be revealed using a non-destructive imaging technique, shows an international team of scientists from JKU and Keysight Technologies (Austria), ETH/EPFL/PSI and IBM Research - Europe (Switzerland) and from UCL (UK). (2020-08-05)
Novel approach improves graphene-based supercapacitors
An efficient in situ pathway to generate and attach oxygen functional groups to graphitic electrodes for supercapacitors by inducing hydrolysis of water molecules within the gel electrolyte. (2020-08-03)
For solar boom, scrap silicon for this promising mineral
Cornell University engineers have found that photovoltaic wafers in solar panels with all-perovskite structures outperform photovoltaic cells made from state-of-the-art crystalline silicon, as well as perovskite-silicon tandem cells, which are stacked pancake-style cells that absorb light better. (2020-08-03)
ETRI develops eco-friendly color thin-film solar cells
Research on solar cells to secure renewable energy sources are ongoing around the world. (2020-07-31)
Trying to listen to the signal from neurons
Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a coaxial cable-inspired needle-electrode. (2020-07-29)
Transforming e-waste into a strong, protective coating for metal
A typical recycling process converts large quantities of items made of a single material into more of the same. (2020-07-29)
Silicon core fishbone waveguide extends frequency comb
It is difficult to make very wide frequency combs from silicon waveguides, but clever waveguide engineering may be about to make that task a bit easier. (2020-07-23)
New detection method turns silicon cameras into mid-infrared detectors
Although mid-infrared (MIR) imaging produces images with chemically selective information, the practical implementation of the technique is hampered by the low pixel count and noise performance of current MIR cameras. (2020-07-21)
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