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Current Social networks News and Events, Social networks News Articles.
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The night gardeners: Immune cells rewire, repair brain while we sleep
Science tells us that a lot of good things happen in our brains while we sleep -- learning and memories are consolidated and waste is removed, among other things. (2019-10-21)
Mathematical modelling vital to tackling disease outbreaks
Predicting and controlling disease outbreaks would be easier and more reliable with the wider application of mathematical modelling, according to a new study. (2019-10-17)
First demonstration of a 1 petabit per second network node
The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) has demonstrated the first large-scale optical switching testbed capable of handling 1 Petabit per second optical signals. (2019-10-17)
Assigning workers to new networks boosts sustainability
Innovation comes from people in different units who have new knowledge, and a new study about conservation organizations suggests encouraging employees to think and act outside network boxes from time to time. (2019-10-17)
Research networks can help BRICS countries combat invasive species
BRICS countries need more networks of researchers dedicated to invasion science if they wish to curb the spread of invasive species within and outside of their borders. (2019-10-16)
New study debunks myth that only children are more narcissistic than kids with siblings
The stereotype that only children are selfish, or more self-centered than those with siblings is sometimes used as an argument for having more than one child, but researchers from Germany find there's no evidence for the claim that only children are more narcissistic than children with sibling. (2019-10-15)
Brain networks more stable in individuals with higher cognitive abilities
Brain imaging study investigates why cognitive abilities differ between individuals. (2019-10-15)
Quantum physics: Ménage à trois photon-style
When two photons become entangled, the quantum state of the first will correlate perfectly with the quantum state of the second. (2019-10-15)
Women have substantially less influence on Twitter than men in academic medicine
Women who are health policy or health services researchers face a significant disparity in social media influence compared to their male peers, according to a new study. (2019-10-14)
Experimentally validated model for drug discovery gets a stamp of mathematical approval
Insilico Medicine, a biotechnology company developing an end-to-end drug discovery pipeline utilizing next-generation artificial intelligence, is proud to present its paper 'A Prior of a Googol Gaussians: a Tensor Ring Induced Prior for Generative Models' at the 33rd Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NeurIPS). (2019-10-14)
Archaeology -- Social inequality in Bronze Age households
Archaeogenetic analyses provide new insights into social inequality 4,000 years ago: nuclear families lived together with foreign women and individuals from lower social classes in the same household. (2019-10-10)
Can being neighborly reduce depression in older adults?
In a Health & Social Care in the Community study of 10,105 older adults in China examined in 2011, 2013, and 2015, living in neighborhoods with a higher level of neighborhood social participation was related to lower rates of depression. (2019-10-09)
Growing and moving
How interactions between neuronal migration and outgrowth shape network architecture. (2019-10-09)
Irony and humour keep teenage #gymlads healthy on social media
Teenage boys rely on social media to access a wealth of information about living a healthy lifestyle -- but rather than being victims of online harms, such as an unhealthy body image obsession, the majority are able to use humour, irony and banter to navigate social media content. (2019-10-09)
Graphene substrate improves the conductivity of carbon nanotube network
Scientists at Aalto University, Finland, and the University of Vienna, Austria, have combined graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes into a transparent hybrid material with conductivity higher than either component exhibits separately. (2019-10-09)
Early hunter-gatherers interacted much sooner than previously believed
A nearly 4,000-year-old burial site found off the coast of Georgia hints at ties between hunter-gatherers on opposite sides of North America, according to research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-10-07)
Large-scale mapping of protein networks behind tumor growth in the lungs
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have used highly sophisticated molecular analyses to identify key proteins in the signaling pathways that cancers use to spread in the body. (2019-10-03)
North American seismic networks can contribute to nuclear security
In a paper published as part of an upcoming focus section on regional seismic networks in Seismological Research Letters, University of Utah seismologist Keith Koper explains how the work of regional seismic networks in North America is contributing to nuclear test monitoring, particularly in the case of low-yield explosions. (2019-10-02)
Full-body interaction videogames enhance social skills in children with autism disorders
Communicating with others is one of the biggest difficulties for autistic children. (2019-10-01)
UBC study highlights need to improve health care access in Vancouver, Portland and Seattle
UBC researchers have developed a data science method that analyzes how easily citizens can access hospitals and walk-in health clinics -- and it's a tool that could eventually help city planners and policymakers build smarter, more equitable cities. (2019-09-30)
Babies have fewer respiratory infections if they have well-connected bacterial networks
Microscopic bacteria, which are present in all humans, cluster together and form communities in different parts of the body, such as the gut, lungs, nose and mouth. (2019-09-30)
Thermal siphon effect: heat flows from low temperature to high temperature
In this work, researchers study (both thermal and electric) energy transport in physical networks that rewired from 2D regular lattices. (2019-09-27)
Positive relationships boost self-esteem, and vice versa
Does having close friends boost your self-esteem, or does having high self-esteem influence the quality of your friendships? (2019-09-26)
Army project brings quantum internet closer to reality
A US Army research result brings the quantum internet a step closer. (2019-09-26)
Impostor syndrome is more common than you think; Study finds best way to cope with it
A new study from researchers reveals that perceptions of impostorism are quite common both in the workplace and the classroom and uncovers one of the best ways to cope with such feelings: seeking social support from those outside their academic program. (2019-09-24)
Diving birds follow each other when fishing
Diving seabirds watch each other to work out when to dive, new research shows. (2019-09-23)
Big cities breed partners in crime
Researchers have long known that bigger cities disproportionately generate more crime. (2019-09-19)
Artificial intelligence probes dark matter in the universe
A team of physicists and computer scientists at ETH Zurich has developed a new approach to the problem of dark matter and dark energy in the universe. (2019-09-18)
Developmental psychology -- One good turn deserves another
Five-year-olds enforce reciprocal behavior in social interactions. A study by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich psychologists shows that children come to recognize reciprocity as a norm between the ages of 3 and 5. (2019-09-18)
Dartmouth study examines prevalence of screening for social needs
A new study from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice finds that most US physician practices and hospitals report screening patients for at least one social need, a trend that is expected to increase in the future, and that practices that care for disadvantaged patients report higher screening rates. (2019-09-18)
Learning to read boosts the visual brain
How does learning to read change our brain? Does reading take up brain space dedicated to seeing objects such as faces, tools or houses? (2019-09-18)
Feeling depressed? Mahjong might be the answer
When it comes to boosting mental health among older Chinese, it might be as simple as a game of mahjong, according to a new study from the University of Georgia. (2019-09-17)
Study: Bigger cities boost 'social crimes'
The same underlying mechanism that boosts urban innovation and startup businesses can also explain why certain types of crimes, like car theft and robbery, thrive in a larger population. (2019-09-17)
New algorithm can distinguish cyberbullies from normal Twitter users with 90% accuracy
A team of researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, have developed machine learning algorithms which can successfully identify bullies and aggressors on Twitter with 90 percent accuracy. (2019-09-16)
Social isolation derails brain development in mice
Female mice housed alone during adolescence show atypical development of the prefrontal cortex and resort to habitual behavior in adulthood, according to new research published in eNeuro. (2019-09-16)
Brain-inspired computing could tackle big problems in a small way
While computers have become smaller and more powerful and supercomputers and parallel computing have become the standard, we are about to hit a wall in energy and miniaturization. (2019-09-13)
Male Trinidad guppies find food thanks to females
For male Trinidad Guppies applies: if you are hungry, seek female company. (2019-09-13)
AI neural network detects heart failure from single heartbeat
Researchers have developed a neural network approach that can accurately identify congestive heart failure with 100% accuracy through analysis of just one raw electrocardiogram (ECG) heartbeat, a new study reports. (2019-09-11)
From years to days: Artificial Intelligence speeds up photodynamics simulations
The prediction of molecular reactions triggered by light is to date extremely time-consuming and therefore costly. (2019-09-11)
Social media use by adolescents linked to internalizing behaviors
A new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that adolescents who spend more than three hours a day on social media are more likely to report high levels of internalizing behaviors compared to adolescents who do not use social media at all. (2019-09-11)
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