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Current Soil moisture News and Events

Current Soil moisture News and Events, Soil moisture News Articles.
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Scientists hit pay dirt with new microbial research technique
Long ago, during the European Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci wrote that we humans 'know more about the movement of celestial bodies than about the soil underfoot.' Five hundred years and innumerable technological and scientific advances later, his sentiment still holds true. (2019-06-24)
Does limited underground water storage make plants less susceptible to drought?
By tracking water flow through different environments in California, UC Berkeley researchers have discovered a secret to the surprising resilence of Mediterranean plant communities during drought years. (2019-06-24)
Tropical soil disturbance could be hidden source of CO2
Florida State researchers working in the Democratic Republic of the Congo found a link between the churning of deep soils during deforestation and the release of carbon dioxide through streams and rivers. (2019-06-24)
Heat kills invasive jumping worm cocoons, could help limit spread
New research out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum shows that temperatures of about 100 degrees Fahrenheit kill the cocoons of invasive jumping worms. (2019-06-20)
Looking for freshwater in all the snowy places
Snowflakes that cover mountains or linger under tree canopies are a vital freshwater resource for over a billion people around the world. (2019-06-20)
One third of Cambodians infected with threadworm, study finds
Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted threadworm that is endemic in many tropical and subtropical areas of the world. (2019-06-20)
Unexpected culprit -- wetlands as source of methane
Knowing how emissions are created can help reduce them. (2019-06-19)
Biochar may boost carbon storage, but benefits to germination and growth appear scant
Biochar may not be the miracle soil additive that many farmers and researchers hoped it to be, according to a new University of Illinois study. (2019-06-19)
Climate change could affect symbiotic relationships between microorganisms and trees
An international research consortium mapped the global distribution of tree-root symbioses with fungi and bacteria that are vital to forest ecosystems. (2019-06-19)
UToledo research links fracking to higher radon levels in Ohio homes
A new study at The University of Toledo connects the proximity of fracking to higher household concentrations of radon gas, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the US. (2019-06-18)
A warming Midwest increases likelihood that farmers will need to irrigate
If current climate and crop-improvement trends continue into the future, Midwestern corn growers who today rely on rainfall to water their crops will need to irrigate their fields, a new study finds. (2019-06-18)
Farm-like indoor microbiota may protect children from asthma also in urban homes
A child's risk of developing asthma is the lower the more the microbiota of the child's home resembles that of a farm house. (2019-06-17)
Scientists unearth green treasure -- albeit rusty -- in the soil
Cornell University engineers have taken a step in understanding how iron in the soil may unlock naturally occurring phosphorus bound in organic matter, which can be used in fertilizer, so that one day farmers may be able to reduce the amount of artificial fertilizers applied to fields. (2019-06-17)
From rain to flood
Extreme weather events, such as thunderstorms or heavy rainfall and the resulting floods, influence Earth and environmental systems in the long term. (2019-06-13)
NASA explores our changing freshwater world
Water is so commonplace that we often take it for granted. (2019-06-12)
New family on the block: A novel group of glycosidic enzymes
A group of researchers from Japan has recently discovered a novel enzyme from a soil fungus. (2019-06-11)
Superweed resists another class of herbicides, study finds
We've all heard about bacteria that are becoming resistant to multiple types of antibiotics. (2019-06-11)
New study shows how climate change could affect impact of roundworms on grasslands
The researchers found in extreme drought conditions that predator nematodes significantly decreased, which led to the growth of root-feeding nematodes. (2019-06-10)
Foraging for nitrogen
As sessile organisms, plants rely on their ability to adapt the development and growth of their roots in response to changing nutrient conditions. (2019-06-07)
New process to rinse heavy metals from soils
Poisonous heavy metals contaminating thousands of sites nationwide threaten to enter the food chain, and there's been no easy way to remove them. (2019-06-04)
Heat, not drought, will drive lower crop yields, researchers say
Climate change-induced heat stress will play a larger role than drought stress in reducing the yields of several major US crops later this century, according to Cornell University researchers who weighed in on a high-stakes debate between crop experts and scientists. (2019-06-03)
The University of Cordoba guides plants towards obtaining iron
A team at the University of Cordoba relates the presence of beneficial organisms in plant roots to their response to iron deficiency. (2019-05-29)
Healthy fat hidden in dirt may fend off anxiety disorders
Thirty years after scientists first suggested that increased exposure to microorganisms could benefit health, CU Boulder researchers have identified an anti-inflammatory fat in a soil-dwelling bacterium that may be partly responsible. (2019-05-29)
Farmers and food companies hit the dirt to improve soil health
Big food brands, such as Kellogg, Campbell, Mars Wrigley and General Mills, have started investing in their ingredients by helping farmers improve soil health and sustainability. (2019-05-29)
Using the past to unravel the future for Arctic wetlands
A new study has used partially fossilised plants and single-celled organisms to investigate the effects of climate change on the Canadian High Arctic wetlands and help predict their future. (2019-05-28)
Jumping drops get boost from gravity
'It turns out that surface tension and gravity work far better together than either works on its own.' (2019-05-28)
Chloropicrin application increases production and profit potential for potato growers
Chloropicrin was first used on potato in 1940 as a wireworm suppressant and then in 1965 as a verticillium suppressant. (2019-05-28)
Microaerobic Fe(II) oxidation could drive microbial carbon assimilation in paddy soil
Carbon assimilation process is important to maintain the production and ecological function of paddy field. (2019-05-27)
Soil communities threatened by destruction, instability of Amazon forests
A meta-analysis of nearly 300 studies of soil biodiversity in Amazonian forests found that the abundance, biomass, richness and diversity of soil fauna and microbes were reduced following deforestation. (2019-05-24)
Russian scientists discover one of the mechanisms of water formation on the moon
Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences have discovered one of the mechanisms for how water forms on the moon. (2019-05-23)
Natural environments favor 'good' bacteria
A new study has shown that restoring environments to include a wider range of species can promote 'good' bacteria over 'bad' -- with potential benefits for human health. (2019-05-22)
Seeing inside superfog
Research led by the University of California, Riverside has for the first time produced superfog, a dense combination of smoke and fog, in a laboratory. (2019-05-22)
Studies find no yield benefit to higher plant populations
Curtis Adams and his colleagues at Texas A&M AgriLife Research reviewed plant population studies published in 2000 or later. (2019-05-21)
How plant viruses can be used to ward off pests and keep plants healthy
Imagine a technology that could target pesticides to treat specific spots deep within the soil, making them more effective at controlling infestations while limiting their toxicity to the environment. (2019-05-20)
Where there's waste there's fertilizer
Scientists recycle phosphorus by combining dairy and water treatment leftovers. (2019-05-15)
When biodegradable plastic isn't
The ubiquitous plastic bag is handy for transporting groceries and other items home from the store. (2019-05-15)
Mapping microbial symbioses in forests
Data collected from over 1 million forest plots reveals patterns of where plant roots form symbiotic relationships with fungi and bacteria. (2019-05-15)
Antarctic biodiversity hotspots exist wherever penguins and seals poop
Scientists have found that on the desolate Antarctic peninsula, nitrogen-rich poop from colonies of penguins and seals enriches the soil so well that it helps create biodiversity hotspots throughout the region. (2019-05-09)
Plants and the art of microbial maintenance
How plants use chemicals to sculpt their ecological niche. (2019-05-09)
Arctic rivers provide fingerprint of carbon release from thawing permafrost
The feedback between a warming climate and accelerated release of carbon currently frozen into permafrost around the Arctic is one of the grand challenges in current climate research. (2019-05-07)
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