Nav: Home

Current Solar panels News and Events

Current Solar panels News and Events, Solar panels News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Concrete structure's lifespan extended by a carbon textile
The Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology (KICT) has announced the development of an effective structural strengthening method using a noncombustible carbon textile grid and cement mortar, which can double the load-bearing capacities of structurally deficient concrete structures and increase their usable lifespan by threefold. (2020-10-26)
Turning streetwear into solar power plants
Researchers at Empa and ETH Zurich succeeded in developing a material that works like a luminescent solar concentrator and can even be applied to textiles. (2020-10-22)
Future VR could employ new ultrahigh-res display
Repurposed solar panel research could be the foundation for a new ultrahigh-resolution microdisplay. (2020-10-22)
Smile, wave: Some exoplanets may be able to see us, too
Three decades after Cornell astronomer Carl Sagan suggested that Voyager 1 snap Earth's picture from billions of miles away - resulting in the iconic Pale Blue Dot photograph - two astronomers now offer another unique cosmic perspective: Some exoplanets - planets from beyond our own solar system - have a direct line of sight to observe Earth's biological qualities from far, far away. (2020-10-21)
Colorful Perovskites: NREL advances thermochromic window technologies
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) report a breakthrough in developing a next-generation thermochromic window that not only reduces the need for air conditioning but simultaneously generates electricity. (2020-10-20)
Sludge-powered bacteria generate more electricity, faster
A new electroactive bacterium could help fuel wastewater treatment reactors. (2020-10-19)
Studying new solar tracking strategies to maximize electric production
The University of Cordoba analyzed a new strategy for solar tracking using backtracking in order to avoid shadows being cast among solar panels in photovoltaic plants (2020-10-19)
Tough love: intense glare helps next-gen solar tech through awkward phase
Researchers have shown that high-intensity light will reverse light-induced phase segregation in mixed-halide perovskites, enabling bandgap control and maximising efficiency for potential photovoltaic applications. (2020-10-19)
Ultraviolet shines light on origins of the solar system
In the search to discover the origins of our solar system, an international team of researchers, including planetary scientist and cosmochemist James Lyons of Arizona State University, has compared the composition of the sun to the composition of the most ancient materials that formed in our solar system: refractory inclusions in unmetamorphosed meteorites. (2020-10-19)
Surrey is leading the way in perovskite tandem solar cells
Scientists from the University of Surrey have revealed the significant improvements they are making in perovskite-based solar cells. (2020-10-16)
Scientists develop detector for investigating the sun
Researchers from MIPT have developed a prototype detector of solar particles. (2020-10-13)
The mountains of Pluto are snowcapped, but not for the same reasons as on Earth
In 2015, the New Horizons space probe discovered spectacular snowcapped mountains on Pluto, which are strikingly similar to mountains on Earth. (2020-10-13)
And the winner is... dependent on judging accountability
A new study suggests that the status of award nominees combined with the level of social connection that they have with members of a judging panel can work both ways towards determining how successful they are -- depending on whether or not they are judged publicly or privately. (2020-10-13)
Studying the sun as a star to understand stellar flares and exoplanets
New research shows that sunspots and other active regions can change the overall solar emissions. (2020-10-12)
Mass loss driven shape evolution model unveils formation of flattened 'snowman' (486958) Arrokoth
An international research team led by Assoc. Prof. ZHAO Yuhui from the Purple Mountain Observatory has built and applied a mass-loss-driven shape evolution model (MONET) and suggested that the current flattened shape of Arrokoth could be of evolutionary origin due to volatile outgassing in a timescale of about 1-100 Myr, which provides a natural explanation for the flattening shape of the body. (2020-10-12)
Scientists author papers in Nature Astronomy chronicling legacy of Spitzer space telescope
NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, decommissioned earlier this year, made important discoveries about comets, stars, exoplanets and distant galaxies, leaving a lasting legacy of solar system science. (2020-10-12)
The distance local energy goes to bring power to the people
A study published today in the journal Frontiers in Sustainability by the University of California, Davis, sheds light on the lengths alternative energy providers go to bring electrical power to customers. (2020-10-12)
Spitzer space telescope legacy chronicled in Nature Astronomy
A national team of scientists Thursday published in the journal Nature Astronomy two papers that provide an inventory of the major discoveries made possible thanks to Spitzer and offer guidance on where the next generation of explorers should point the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) when it launches in October 2021. (2020-10-09)
A new look at sunspots
NASA's extensive fleet of spacecraft allows scientists to study the Sun extremely close-up - one of the agency's spacecraft is even on its way to fly through the Sun's outer atmosphere. (2020-10-09)
New measurements of the solar spectrum verify Einstein's theory of General Relativity
An international team of researchers led by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has measured, with unprecedented accuracy, the gravitational redshift of the Sun, a change in frequency of the lines in the solar spectrum which is produced when the light escapes from the gravitational field of the Sun on its way to Earth. (2020-10-08)
SNew solar panel design could lead to wider use of renewable energy
Researchers say the breakthrough could lead to the production of thinner, lighter and more flexible solar panels that could be used to power more homes and be used in a wider range of products. (2020-10-08)
Are online grocery stores being designed to support consumer nutrition information needs?
With a steady growth in online grocery shopping, a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, examines the availability of nutrition-related information on leading grocery store websites. (2020-10-07)
Climate change could mean fewer sunny days for hot regions banking on solar power
Changes to regional climates brought on by global warming could make it so that areas such as the American Southwest that are currently considered ideal for solar power would be less viable in the future, a Princeton-based study suggests. (2020-10-07)
Multi-institutional team extracts more energy from sunlight with advanced solar panels
Researchers working to maximize solar panel efficiency said layering advanced materials atop traditional silicon is a promising path to eke more energy out of sunlight. (2020-10-06)
Some planets may be better for life than Earth
Researchers have identified two dozen planets outside our solar system that may have conditions more suitable for life than our own. (2020-10-05)
Blocking vibrations that remove heat could boost efficiency of next-gen solar cells
Led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, a study of a solar-energy material with a bright future revealed a way to slow phonons, the waves that transport heat. (2020-10-05)
Arrokoth: Flattening of a snowman
The trans-Neptunian object Arrokoth, also known as Ultima Thule, which NASA's space probe New Horizons passed on New Year's Day 2019, may have changed its shape significantly in the first 100 million years since its formation. (2020-10-05)
Lighting the path to recycling carbon dioxide
Combining solar-harvesting materials with carbon-dioxide-consuming microbes could be an efficient way to generate clean fuels. (2020-10-05)
Tohoku University teaches old spectroscope new tricks
Tohoku University researchers have improved a method for probing semiconducting crystals with light to detect defects and impurities. (2020-10-05)
Chemical innovation stabilizes best-performing perovskite formulation
Publishing in Science, researchers at EPFL have successfully overcome a limiting problem with stabilizing the best-performing formulation of metal-halide perovskite films, a key player in a range of applications, including solar cells. (2020-10-01)
Venus might be habitable today, if not for Jupiter
Venus might not be a sweltering, waterless hellscape today, if Jupiter hadn't altered its orbit around the sun, according to new UC Riverside research. (2020-09-30)
Scientists capture candid snapshots of electrons harvesting light at the atomic scale
A team of scientists led by Berkeley Lab has gained important new insight into electrons' role in the harvesting of light in artificial photosynthesis systems. (2020-09-30)
How green hydrogen can become cheap enough to compete with fossil fuels
The green hydrogen revolution is coming, and Australia is perfectly placed to take advantage of it, an analysis of production costs by UNSW engineers has shown. (2020-09-30)
Second alignment plane of solar system discovered
A study of comet motions indicates that the Solar System has a second alignment plane. (2020-09-29)
Untapped potential exists for blending hydropower, floating PV
Hybrid systems of floating solar panels and hydropower plants may hold the technical potential to produce a significant portion of the electricity generated annually across the globe, according to an analysis by researchers at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). (2020-09-29)
SwRI study describes discovery of close binary trans-Neptunian object
A new study authored by Southwest Research Institute scientists Rodrigo Leiva and Marc Buie reveals the binary nature of a trans-Neptunian object (TNO). (2020-09-28)
New storage battery more efficient and heat-resistant
The more important renewable energy sources become, the more urgent is the need to store the electricity produced in this way. (2020-09-25)
Air pollution leads to increase in electricity usage, study suggests
High levels of air pollution are forcing people inside to consume more electricity, subsequently causing even greater environmental problems by increasing greenhouse gas emissions. (2020-09-24)
Remnants of an ancient asteroid shed new light on the early solar system
Researchers have shaken up a once accepted timeline for cataclysmic events in the early solar system. (2020-09-24)
WPI math professor verifies centuries-old conjecture about formation of the solar system
Using a limited set of mathematical equations, Worcester Polytechnic Institute mathematical sciences professor Mayer Humi said he has confirmed a 224-year-old math conjecture about the origins of our solar system, providing insights about the process that leads to the formation of solar systems across the universe. (2020-09-23)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.