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Current Sound waves News and Events, Sound waves News Articles.
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Tissue dynamics provide clues to human disease
Scientists in EMBL Barcelona's Ebisuya group, with collaborators from RIKEN, Kyoto University, and Meijo Hospital in Nagoya, Japan, have studied oscillating patterns of gene expression, coordinated across time and space within a tissue grown in vitro, to explore the molecular causes of a rare human hereditary disease known as spondylocostal dysostosis. (2020-04-03)
Giant umbrellas shift from convenient canopy to sturdy storm shield
In a new approach to storm surge protection, a Princeton team has created a preliminary design for dual-purpose kinetic umbrellas that would provide shade during fair weather and could be tilted in advance of a storm to form a flood barrier. (2020-04-02)
Surprising hearing talents in cormorants
The great cormorant has more sensitive hearing under water than in air. (2020-04-01)
Not just for bones! X-rays can now tell us about soft tissues too
A new X-ray imaging technique could identify lesions and tumors before ultrasound or MRI can. (2020-03-31)
Surfing the waves: Electrons break law to go with the flow
Researchers measure how fluid changes the movement of electrons. (2020-03-30)
A nanoscale device to generate high-power Terahertz waves
Researchers at EPFL have developed a nanodevice, described today in Nature, that operates more than 10 times faster than today's fastest transistors. (2020-03-25)
Supermassive black holes shortly after the Big Bang: How to seed them
They are billions of times larger than our Sun: how is it possible that supermassive black holes were already present when the Universe was 'just' 800 million years old? (2020-03-23)
The growth of an organism rides on a pattern of waves
Study shows ripples across a newly fertilized egg are similar to other systems, from ocean and atmospheric circulations to quantum fluids. (2020-03-23)
How the brain controls the voice
A particular neuronal circuit in the brains of bats controls their vocalisations. (2020-03-20)
Device could 'hear' disease through structures housing cells
Researchers have built a device that uses sound waves to detect the stiffness of an extracellular matrix, a structural network that contains cells. (2020-03-20)
Symmetry-enforced three-dimension Dirac phononic crystals
Dirac semimetals are critical states of topologically distinct phases. Such gapless topological states have been accomplished by a band-inversion mechanism, in which the Dirac points can be annihilated pairwise by perturbations without changing the symmetry of the system. (2020-03-19)
Precision mirrors poised to improve sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors
Deformable mirrors, which are used to shape and control laser light, have a surface made of tiny mirrors that can each be moved, or actuated, to change the overall shape of the mirror. (2020-03-18)
Trauma relapse in a novel context may be preventable
Korea Brain Research Institute (KBRI, President: Pann-Ghill Suh) announced on February 10 that its research team led by Dr. (2020-03-18)
Physicists propose new filter for blocking high-pitched sounds
Need to reduce high-pitched noises? Science may have an answer. (2020-03-17)
Composing new proteins with artificial intelligence
Scientists have long studied how to improve proteins or design new ones. (2020-03-17)
Peppered with gold
Terahertz waves are becoming more important in science and technology. (2020-03-16)
Scientists discover pulsating remains of a star in an eclipsing double star system
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a pulsating ancient star in a double star system, which will allow them to access important information on the history of how stars like our Sun evolve and eventually die. (2020-03-16)
Scientists can see the bias in your brain
The strength of alpha brain waves reveals if you are about to make a biased decision, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. (2020-03-16)
Blinded by the light
A new paper researching a framework for understanding how light and noise pollution affects wildlife. (2020-03-16)
Sound can directly affect balance and lead to risk of falling
Mount Sinai research highlights the need for more hearing checks among groups at high risk for falls. (2020-03-12)
Researchers create a new acoustic smart material inspired by shark skin
USC researchers created a new sharkskin-inspired smart material that allows shifts in acoustic transmission on demand using magnets. (2020-03-10)
Looking outside the fiber: Researchers demonstrate new concept of optical fiber sensors
Researchers have demonstrated a new concept of optical fiber sensors that addresses a decades-long challenge: the distributed mapping of refractive index outside the cladding of standard fiber, where light does not reach. (2020-03-09)
Ship noise leaves crabs too stressed to hide from danger
The ocean is getting too loud even for crabs. Normally, shore crabs (Carcinus maenas) can slowly change their shell color to blend in with the rocky shore, but recent findings show that prolonged exposure to the sounds of ships weakens their camouflaging powers and leaves them more open to attack. (2020-03-09)
Ship noise hampers crab camouflage
Colour-changing crabs struggle to camouflage themselves when exposed to noise from ships, new research shows. (2020-03-09)
Powering devices goes skin deep
A way to remotely charge batteries through flesh could help develop components for permanent implantable medical devices. (2020-03-08)
Seismic imaging technology could deliver finely detailed images of the human brain
Scientists have developed a new computational technique that could lead to fast, finely detailed brain imaging with a compact device that uses only sound waves. (2020-03-06)
How drones can hear walls
One drone, four microphones and a loudspeaker: nothing more is needed to determine the position of walls and other flat surfaces within a room. (2020-03-06)
Topology protects light propagation in photonic crystal
Researchers of AMOLF and TU Delft have seen light propagate in a special material without it suffering from reflections. (2020-03-06)
Radar and ice could help detect an elusive subatomic particle
A new study published today in the journal Physical Review Letters shows, for the first time, an experiment that could detect a class of ultra-high-energy neutrinos using radar echoes. (2020-03-06)
Public health leaders call for coordinated communication response to COVID-19
On Thursday in the National Academy of Medicine's Perspectives, public health leaders including CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy Distinguished Lecturer Scott Ratzan, MD called for informed and active public policy leadership to employ strategically coordinated health communication and outreach on COVID-19 and other emerging global health threats. (2020-03-05)
Cooling magnets with sound
Today, most quantum experiments are carried out with the help of light, including those in nanomechanics, where tiny objects are cooled with electromagnetic waves to such an extent that they reveal quantum properties. (2020-03-05)
Veterinarians: Dogs, too, can experience hearing loss
Just like humans, dogs are sometimes born with impaired hearing or experience hearing loss as a result of disease, inflammation, aging or exposure to noise. (2020-03-05)
Satellite data boosts understanding of climate change's effects on kelp
Tapping into 35 years of satellite imagery, researchers have dramatically enlarged the database regarding how climate change is affecting kelps, near-shore seaweeds that provide food and shelter for fish and protect coastlines from wave damage. (2020-03-05)
'Magnonic nanoantennas': optically-inspired computing with spin waves one step closer
A new methodology for generating and manipulating spin waves in nanostructured magnetic materials opens the way to developing nano-processors for extraordinarily quick and energy efficient analog processing of information. (2020-03-05)
Terahertz radiation technique opens a new door for studying atomic behavior
Researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have made a promising new advance for the lab's high-speed 'electron camera' that could allow them to 'film' tiny, ultrafast motions of protons and electrons in chemical reactions that have never been seen before. (2020-03-05)
Virtualized metamaterials opens door for acoustics application and beyond
Scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have realized what they called a virtualized acoustic metamaterial, in digitizing material response to an impulse response stored in a software program. (2020-03-03)
Unstable rock pillars near reservoirs can produce dangerous water waves
In many coastal zones and gorges, unstable cliffs often fail when the foundation rock beneath them is crushed. (2020-03-03)
Biometric devices help pinpoint factory workers' emotions and productivity
Happiness, as measured by a wearable biometric device, was closely related to productivity among a group of factory workers in Laos, reveals a recent study. (2020-03-02)
APS tip sheet: Using bird song to determine bird size
An analysis of a bird species' unique rasps shows how sound fluctuations in birds' songs might reveal details about birds' body sizes. (2020-03-02)
Reconfigurable chiral microlaser by spontaneous symmetry breaking
A team of researchers led by Professor Xiao Yun-Feng and Professor Gong Qihuang at Peking University has demonstrated a spontaneously symmetry-broken microlaser in an ultrahigh-Q WGM microcavity, exhibiting reconfigurable propagating directions of the chiral laser. (2020-02-28)
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