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Current Species News and Events

Current Species News and Events, Species News Articles.
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Breakthrough in battle against invasive plants
Plants that can 'bounce back' after disturbances like ploughing, flooding or drought are the most likely to be 'invasive' if they're moved to new parts of the world, scientists say. (2019-12-06)
Siberian blue lakes and their inhabitants
There are picturesque but poorly studied blue lakes situated in Western Siberia. (2019-12-05)
Conferring leaf rust resistance in cereal crops
Identifying genes that confer resistance to leaf rust infections could help generate durably resistant cereal crops. (2019-12-05)
Ecology: Wildfire may benefit forest bats
Bats respond to wildfires in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in varied but often positive ways, a study in Scientific Reports suggests. (2019-12-05)
Bats may benefit from wildfire
Bats face many threats -- from habitat loss and climate change to emerging diseases, such as white-nose syndrome. (2019-12-05)
Lights on fishing nets save turtles and dolphins
Placing lights on fishing nets reduces the chances of sea turtles and dolphins being caught by accident, new research shows. (2019-12-05)
How flowers adapt to their pollinators
The first flowering plants originated more than 140 million years ago in the early Cretaceous. (2019-12-05)
New early Cretaceous mammal fossils bridge a transitional gap in ear's evolution
Fossils of a previously unknown species of Early Cretaceous mammal have caught in the act the final steps by which mammals' multi-boned middle ears evolved, according to a new study. (2019-12-05)
Animals that evolved in low-disturbance areas more 'sensitive' to modern disruption
Animal species that have evolved, and survived, in low-disturbance environments -- with little interruption from glaciation, fires, hurricanes, or anthropogenic clearing -- are more sensitive to modern forest fragmentation, report Matthew Betts and colleagues. (2019-12-05)
Forest fragmentation hits wildlife hardest in the tropics
Animals that evolved in environments subject to large-scale habitat-altering events like fires and storms are better equipped to handle forest fragmentation caused by human development than species in low-disturbance environments. (2019-12-05)
Wildlife in tropics hardest hit by forests being broken up
Tropical species are six times more sensitive to forests being broken up for logging or farming than temperate species, says new research. (2019-12-05)
Record-size sex chromosome found in two bird species
Researchers in Sweden and the UK have discovered the largest known avian sex chromosome. (2019-12-04)
Untangling the branches in the mammal tree of life
In a new study published in the journal PLOS Biology, researchers at Yale University unveil a complete overhaul of the way species data is brought together and analyzed to construct an evolutionary tree of life for mammals. (2019-12-04)
Female fish can breed a new species if they aren't choosy about who is Mr. Right
Female fish can breed a new species if they aren't choosy about who is Mr. (2019-12-03)
Global levels of biodiversity could be lower than we think, new study warns
Biodiversity across the globe could be in a worse state than previously thought, as assessments fail to account for long-lasting impact of land change, a new study has warned. (2019-12-02)
New evolutionary insights into the early development of songbirds
An international team led by Alexander Suh at Uppsala University has sequenced a chromosome in zebra finches called the germline-restricted chromosome (GRC). (2019-11-29)
Australia's got mussels (but it could be a problem)
One of the world's most notorious invasive species has established itself on Australia's coastlines, according to research from The University of Queensland. (2019-11-28)
SFU researchers discover eyes a potential window for managing insects without chemicals
The world's insects are headed down the path of extinction with more than 40% of insect species in decline according to the first global scientific review, published in early 2019. (2019-11-28)
Nearly 40% of species are very rare and are vulnerable to climate change
Almost 40 percent of global flora is categorized as 'exceedingly rare,' and these species are most at risk of extinction by human development and as the climate continues to change, according to new University of Arizona-led research. (2019-11-27)
COP25 special collection: Keep climate change impacts under control by making biodiversity a focus
Under a 2°Celsius warming scenario, 80 to 83% of language areas in New Guinea -- home to the greatest biological and linguistic diversity of any tropical island on Earth -- will experience decreases in the diversity of useful plant species by 2070, according to a new study. (2019-11-27)
Shrewd savannah species choose friends with benefits on the African plains
For species trying to boost their chances of avoiding predation, it could be a classic case of 'it's not what you know, it's who you know that matters,' according to new research. (2019-11-27)
Woody plants with undesirable tendencies
A weed is normally defined as a plant, native or non-native, that is not valued where it is growing. (2019-11-26)
Marine community composition shifts in predictable ways in warming oceans
Global simulations suggest plankton and fish species are showing resilience to climate change by going deeper underwater or moving to higher latitudes. (2019-11-25)
Climate change is reshaping communities of ocean organisms
Climate change is reshaping communities of fish and other sea life, according to a pioneering study on how ocean warming is affecting the mix of species. (2019-11-25)
Study tracks genomic changes that reinforce darter speciation
When they share habitat, orangethroat and rainbow darters tend to avoid one another, even though they are closely related and can produce 'hybrid' offspring. (2019-11-25)
The heat is on
Climate change is reorganizing the life in our oceans in a big way: as waters warm, cold-loving species, from plankton to fish, leave the area and warm water species become more successful. (2019-11-25)
Almost a third of tropical Africa's flora faces extinction
31.7% of tropical Africa's vascular plant species could be threatened with extinction, reveals an international study coordinated by an IRD researcher, published in the journal Science Advances on 20 November 2019. (2019-11-21)
UT mathematician develops model to control spread of aquatic invasive species
Adjusting the water flow rate in a river can prevent invasive species from moving upstream and expanding their range. (2019-11-21)
A decade after the predators have gone, Galapagos Island finches are still being spooked
On some of the Galapagos Islands where human-introduced predators of Darwin's finches were eradicated over a decade ago, the finches are still acting as though they are in danger, according to research published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology. (2019-11-20)
New species of seaweed uncovered by genetic analyses
Genetic analyses have revealed remarkably higher species diversity in common red seaweed than previously assumed. (2019-11-19)
Researchers find striking variation in mechanisms that drive sex selection in frogs
Researchers from McMaster University have discovered striking variation in the underlying genetic machinery that orchestrates sexual differentiation in frogs, demonstrating that evolution of this crucial biological system has moved at a dramatic pace. (2019-11-19)
Unlikely wasp enemy of a serious alien pest in North America named Idris elba
Idris is a worldwide genus of microscopic, parasitic wasps. A new species of Idris from Mexico (Guanajuato) and the United States (California, New Mexico) proved to be an unlikely enemy of the invasive bagrada bug, a major pest of various crops, including cruciferous vegetables. (2019-11-18)
The global distribution of freshwater plants is controlled by catchment characteristics
Unlike land plants, photosynthesis in many aquatic plants relies on bicarbonate in addition to CO2 to compensate for the low availability of CO2 in water. (2019-11-15)
Genes borrowed from bacteria allowed plants to move to land
Natural genetic engineering allowed plants to move from water to land, according to a new study by an international group of scientists from Canada, China, France, Germany, and Russia. (2019-11-14)
Spot the difference: Two identical-looking bird species with very different genes
While reports of species going extinct are sadly becoming common, an international team of scientists has identified a new species of bird living on the Southern coast of China, that diverged from their Northern relatives around half a million years ago. (2019-11-13)
Genetics of species-specific birdsong revealed
Researchers have discovered the genetic mechanism that explains how birds sing different songs depending on their species. (2019-11-13)
Cats of the sea offer insights into territorial behavior of wild fishes
Researchers carrying out regular monitoring of a Marine Protected Area off the UK coastline noticed species of wrasse demonstrating almost cat-like behaviour as they chased lasers shone onto the seabed. (2019-11-12)
Larger than life: Augmented ants
The first app of its kind allows users to interact with biodiversity research through augmented reality. (2019-11-12)
Ant expert discovers newly emergent species in his backyard
Jack Longino is a global ant expert and has traveled the world documenting and discovering ant species. (2019-11-12)
Found: Miniature fanged 'deer' rediscovered tiptoeing through Vietnam's coastal forests
Global Wildlife Conservation and partners Southern Institute of Ecology and Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research have rediscovered a species lost to science since 1990 called a silver-backed chevrotain -- a deer-like species that is the size of a rabbit, has a silver sheen, and has been hanging on in a region of Vietnam ravaged by poaching by snares. (2019-11-11)
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