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Current Species News and Events, Species News Articles.
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New research shows that mites and ticks are close relatives
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum in London have reconstructed the evolutionary history of the chelicerates, the mega-diverse group of 110,000 arthropods that includes spiders, scorpions, mites and ticks. (2019-05-24)
How to prevent mosquitofish from spreading in water ecosystems
Preventing the introduction of the mosquitofish and removing its population are the most effective actions to control the dispersal of this exotic fish in ponds and lakes, according to a study published in the journal Science of the Total Environment. (2019-05-24)
How corn's ancient ancestor swipes left on crossbreeding
Determining how one species becomes distinct from another has been a subject of fascination dating back to Charles Darwin. (2019-05-24)
Study reveals the evolution and diversity of Leptospira bacteria
Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonotic disease that affects more than one million people around the world each year. (2019-05-23)
New approach for determining conservation threat for species with little data
University of British Columbia researchers have found a new way to identify which marine species are threatened and what is threatening them, even if these species lack data. (2019-05-22)
Mapping the global distribution of phytoplankton
Researchers at ETH have charted the distribution of phytoplankton in the world's oceans for the first time and investigated the environmental factors that explain this distribution. (2019-05-22)
First report of powdery mildew on phasey bean in Florida could spell trouble for papaya
In the fall of 2017, leaves of phasey bean plants in Homestead, Florida, displayed powdery fungal growth, which appeared in the form of white spots on both sides of the leaves. (2019-05-21)
Extreme draining of reservoir aids young salmon and eliminates invasive fish
A new study finds that the low-cost, extreme draining of a reservoir in Oregon aided downstream migration of juvenile chinook salmon -- and led to the gradual disappearance of two species of predatory invasive fish in the artificial lake. (2019-05-21)
Reverse-engineered computer model provides new insights into larval behavior
Scientists have developed a new approach to describe the behaviors of microscopic marine larvae, which will improve future predictions of how they disperse and distribute. (2019-05-20)
A tale of two skeeters
A native mosquito in Missouri has fewer parasites when it shares its waters with an interloper, according to new research from biologists at Tyson Research Center, the environmental field station for Washington University in St. (2019-05-16)
Research brief: Protecting rare species can benefit human life
Preserving rare species for the sake of global biodiversity has long been the primary focus for conservationists. (2019-05-16)
Meet the tenrecs
Researchers reviewed the conservation priorities for the 31 species of tenrec -- a poorly understood family of small mammals superficially resembling hedgehogs, found only on the island of Madagascar. (2019-05-16)
Species may disappear faster than anticipated, according to new data models
A new study in Journal of Applied Ecology equips scientists to more accurately predict whether, and when, a species will go extinct by being more realistic about how long it takes populations to establish each new generation. (2019-05-16)
Escaped pet parrots are now naturalized in 23 US states, study finds
Research data on bird sightings finds that 56 different parrot species have been spotted in 43 states, and 25 of those species are now breeding in the wild in 23 different states. (2019-05-14)
Birds outside their comfort zone are more vulnerable to deforestation
Members of the same bird species can have dramatically different responses to deforestation depending on where they live, finds a new study. (2019-05-09)
Finnish researchers discover a new moth family
Two moth species new to science belonging to a previously unknown genus and family have been found in Kazakhstan, constituting an exceptional discovery. (2019-05-09)
Medicinal mushroom newly reported from Thailand helps reveal optimum growth conditions
A species of globally recognised medicinal mushroom was recorded for the first time in Thailand. (2019-05-08)
Statistical study finds it unlikely South African fossil species is ancestral to humans
Research by UChicago paleontologists finds that it is unlikely that a two-million-year-old, apelike fossil from South Africa is a direct ancestor of Homo, the genus to which modern-day humans belong. (2019-05-08)
Climate change -- early spring: Predicting budburst with genetics
Tree and shrub genetics can be used to produce more accurate predictions of when leaves will burst bud in the spring, according to a Canada-US study. (2019-05-07)
New species of fish parasite named after Xena, the warrior princess
A study of crustacean parasites attaching themselves inside the branchial cavities (the gills) of their fish hosts was conducted in order to reveal potentially unrecognised diversity of the genus Elthusa in South Africa. (2019-05-07)
Close relatives can coexist: two flower species show us how
Scientists have discovered how two closely-related species of Asiatic dayflower can coexist in the wild despite their competitive relationship. (2019-05-07)
UV lights on power lines may help save Sandhill cranes
Crane species are declining around the world, and lethal collisions with power lines are an ongoing threat to many crane populations. (2019-05-06)
Even more amphibians are endangered than we thought
Due to a lack of data on many amphibian species, only about 44% of amphibians have up-to-date assessments on their risk of extinction, compared to nearly 100% of both birds and mammals. (2019-05-06)
Many more amphibian species at risk of extinction than previously thought
Frogs already knew it wasn't easy being green, but the going just got a lot tougher for the 1,012 additional species of amphibians who have now been newly identified as at risk of extinction in a Yale-led study. (2019-05-06)
Genetic adaptation to climate change
New research led by the University of Southampton has shown that the threat of range losses for some species as a result of climate change could be overestimated because of the ability of certain animals to adapt to rising temperatures and aridity. (2019-05-06)
The quiet loss of knowledge threatens indigenous communities
Most of the knowledge that indigenous communities in South America have about plants is not written down. (2019-05-02)
Gulf killifish adapts to pollution with help of gene exchange with non-native cousin
The Gulf killifish of Galveston Bay, Texas, was both nearly doomed to local extinction by humans transforming its home to a toxic soup, and also rescued by humans -- through their accidental introduction of an invasive fish genetically armed with pollution-resistant traits. (2019-05-02)
Fifteen years of mosquito data implicate species most likely to transmit West Nile virus in Iowa
A study published this week that analyzed 15 years of mosquito surveillance data shows Iowa's western counties experience a higher abundance of the species thought to most commonly carry West Nile virus. (2019-05-02)
Genome analysis of yams reveals new cradle of crop domestication in West Africa
Yams as seen today in West Africa descended from a forest species, a new study finds. (2019-05-01)
US cities host more regionally unique species than previously thought
To better understand whether rapidly growing cities are hosting the same species, a team from the California Academy of Sciences analyzed an immense volume of data gathered by citizen scientists during the four-day global City Nature Challenge. (2019-04-30)
Biologists warn of peril from biological invasions as White House cuts funding
As the Trump Administration prepares to cut in half the budget for the National Invasive Species Council, a group of invasive species experts has issued a warning about the growing peril of biological invasions and the increasing threat they pose to the economy, environment, public health and national security. (2019-04-30)
Changing climate may affect animal-to-human disease transfer
Climate change could affect occurrences of diseases like bird-flu and Ebola, with environmental factors playing a larger role than previously understood in animal-to-human disease transfer. (2019-04-30)
For certain invasive species, catching infestation early pays off
An international research team led by invasion ecologist Bethany Bradley at UMass Amherst has conducted the first global meta-analysis of the characteristics and size of invasive alien species' impacts on native species as invaders become more abundant. (2019-04-29)
How the bumble bee got its stripes
Researchers have discovered a gene that drives color differences within a species of bumble bees, helping to explain the highly diverse color patterns among bumble bees. (2019-04-29)
Latitudinal gradient of plant phylogenetic diversity explained
The most discussed global pattern of species diversity along the latitudinal gradient has now an evolutionary explanation: museum vs cradle hypothesis broken into pieces. (2019-04-26)
US Southeast Atlantic coast facing high threat of sea-level rise in the next 10 years
New research shows 75% of the Atlantic coast from North Carolina to central Florida will be highly vulnerable to erosion and inundation from rising tides by 2030, negatively impacting many coastal species' nesting habitats. (2019-04-26)
New perennial brome-grass from Iberian Peninsula named after Picos de Europa National Park
Picos de Europa National Park has given its name to a new species of perennial brome-grass from Spain. (2019-04-24)
Global warming hits sea creatures hardest
Global warming has caused twice as many ocean-dwelling species as land-dwelling species to disappear from their habitats, a unique Rutgers-led study found. (2019-04-24)
With flower preferences, bees have a big gap between the sexes
For scores of wild bee species, females and males visit very different flowers for food -- a discovery that could be important for conservation efforts, according to Rutgers-led research. (2019-04-24)
What the vibrant pigments of bird feathers can teach us about how evolution works
A UA team shows that evolution is driven by dependency on other species within ecological communities - testing a long-held idea of the UA's late, great George Gaylord Simpson. (2019-04-24)
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