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Current Speech News and Events, Speech News Articles.
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Speech processing hierarchy in the dog brain
Dog brains, just as human brains, process speech hierarchically: intonations at lower, word meanings at higher stages, according to a new study by Hungarian researchers. (2020-08-03)
'SoundWear' a heads-up sound augmentation gadget helps expand children's play experience
KAIST researchers designed a wearable bracelet using sound augmentation to leverage play benefits by employing digital technology. (2020-07-27)
Animals who try to sound 'bigger' are good at learning sounds
Some animals fake their body size by sounding 'bigger' than they actually are. (2020-07-08)
Context reduces racial bias in hate speech detection algorithms
When it comes to accurately flagging hate speech on social media, context matters, says a new USC study aimed at reducing errors that could amplify racial bias. (2020-07-06)
New study shows how tests of hearing can reveal HIV's effects on the brain
Findings from a new study published in Clinical Neurophysiology, involving a collaborative effort between Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory at Northwestern University, are shedding further light on how the brain's auditory system may provide a window into how the brain is affected by HIV. (2020-06-29)
Computational model decodes speech by predicting it
UNIGE scientists developed a neuro-computer model which helps explain how the brain identifies syllables in natural speech. (2020-06-26)
Variability in natural speech is challenging for the dyslexic brain
A new study brings neural-level evidence that the continuous variation in natural speech makes the discrimination of phonemes challenging for adults suffering from developmental reading-deficit dyslexia. (2020-06-25)
The human brain tracks speech more closely in time than other sounds
The way that speech processing differs from the processing of other sounds has long been a major open question in human neuroscience. (2020-06-22)
Smartphone app uses voice recordings to detect fluid in the lungs
Voice analysis by a smartphone app identifies lung congestion in heart failure patients, allowing early intervention before their condition deteriorates. (2020-06-19)
Stroke survival rates worse in rural areas, study says
A major US study reveals large gaps between urban and rural patients in quality of care received after a stroke and rates of survival. (2020-06-18)
Asthma among children with developmental disabilities
How common asthma was among children with various developmental disabilities (including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder and vision, hearing or speech delay) was compared to children without disabilities in this survey study. (2020-06-16)
AI reduces 'communication gap' for nonverbal people by as much as half
Researchers have used artificial intelligence to reduce the 'communication gap' for nonverbal people with motor disabilities who rely on computers to converse with others. (2020-06-15)
How the brain controls our speech
Speaking requires both sides of the brain. Each hemisphere takes over a part of the complex task of forming sounds, modulating the voice and monitoring what has been said. (2020-06-10)
Vision loss influences perception of sound
People with severe vision loss can less accurately judge the distance of nearby sounds, potentially putting them more at risk of injury. (2020-06-03)
Chimpanzees help trace the evolution of human speech back to ancient ancestors
One of the most promising theories for the evolution of human speech has finally received support from chimpanzee communication, in a study conducted by a group of researchers led by the University of Warwick. (2020-05-26)
Gestures heard as well as seen
Gesturing with the hands while speaking is a common human behavior, but no one knows why we do it. (2020-05-18)
The dreaming brain tunes out the outside world
Scientists from the CNRS and the ENS-PSL in France and Monash University in Australia have shown that the brain suppresses information from the outside world, such as the sound of a conversation, during the sleep phase linked to dreaming. (2020-05-15)
Similar brain glitch found in slips of signing, speaking
The discovery of a common neural mechanism in speech and ASL errors -- one that occurs in just 40 milliseconds -- could improve recovery in deaf signers after a stroke. (2020-05-04)
New genes linked to severe childhood speech disorder
An international study has discovered nine new genes linked to the most severe type of childhood speech disorder, apraxia. (2020-04-29)
Anxious about public speaking? Your smart speaker could help
A team of researchers at Penn State has developed a public-speaking tutor on the Amazon Alexa platform. (2020-04-25)
Tel Aviv University's Kantor Center reports 18% rise in antisemitic incidents in 2019
The annual report from Tel Aviv University's Kantor Center for the Study of Contemporary European Jewry and the Moshe Kantor Database for the Study of Contemporary Antisemitism and Racism finds that there was an 18% rise in violent antisemitic incidents in 2019. (2020-04-22)
What protects minority languages from extinction?
A new study by Jean-Marc Luck from Paris and Anita Mehta from Oxford published in EPJ B, uses mathematical modelling to suggest two mechanisms through which majority and minority languages come to coexist in the same area. (2020-04-22)
Origins of human language pathway in the brain at least 25 million years old
The human language pathway in the brain has been identified by scientists as being at least 25 million years old -- 20 million years older than previously thought. (2020-04-20)
Age matters: Paternal age and the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders in children
It is no secret that genetic factors play a role in determining whether children have neurodevelopmental disorders. (2020-04-20)
Children have very precise expectations about adults' communicative actions
Adults talk to babies differently from how we would speak to other adults. (2020-04-07)
How important is speech in transmitting coronavirus?
Normal speech by individuals who are asymptomatic but infected with coronavirus may produce enough aerosolized particles to transmit the infection, according to aerosol scientists at UC Davis. (2020-04-03)
Five language outcome measures evaluated for intellectual disabilities studies
Expressive language sampling yielded five language-related outcome measures that may be useful for treatment studies in intellectual disabilities, especially fragile X syndrome. (2020-03-23)
Portable AI device turns coughing sounds into health data for flu and pandemic forecasting
University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers have invented a portable surveillance device powered by machine learning - called FluSense - which can detect coughing and crowd size in real time, then analyze the data to directly monitor flu-like illnesses and influenza trends. (2020-03-19)
Grainger engineers voice localization techniques for smart speakers
Smart speakers offer a variety of capabilities to help free up both our time and our hands. (2020-03-11)
Self-help groups empower caregivers of children with disabilities
Caregivers in low-income settings will be able to respond to the challenges of bringing up children with disabilities, thanks to a new model created by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI). (2020-03-10)
Study finds music therapy helps stroke patients
New research has found that music therapy sessions have a positive effect on the neurorehabilitation of acute stroke patients, as well as their mood. (2020-03-05)
Using a cappella to explain speech and music specialization
Speech and music are two fundamentally human activities that are decoded in different brain hemispheres. (2020-02-27)
How the brain separates words from song
The perception of speech and music -- two of the most uniquely human uses of sound -- is enabled by specialized neural systems in different brain hemispheres adapted to respond differently to specific features in the acoustic structure of the song, a new study reports. (2020-02-27)
Bilingual mash ups: Counterintuitive findings from sociolinguistics
A new study exposes the fallacy of relying on pronunciation as a measure of linguistic proficiency. (2020-02-26)
Hearing aids may delay cognitive decline, research finds
Wearing hearing aids may delay cognitive decline in older adults and improve brain function, according to promising new research. (2020-02-26)
Study finds picking up a pingpong paddle may benefit people with Parkinson's
Pingpong may hold promise as a possible form of physical therapy for Parkinson's disease. (2020-02-25)
Babies from bilingual homes switch attention faster
Babies born into bilingual homes change the focus of their attention more quickly and more frequently than babies in homes where only one language is spoken, according to new research published in the journal Royal Society Open Science. (2020-02-25)
Research finds support for 'Trump effect'
In the years since the 2016 presidential election, many have speculated Donald Trump's racially inflammatory speech empowered people with latent prejudices to finally act on them -- a phenomenon known as the 'Trump effect.' Now, a new study from a team of political scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found empirical support that suggests Trump's inflammatory remarks on the campaign trail emboldened particular members of the American public to express deeply held prejudices. (2020-02-24)
Language disorders as indicators of the diagnosis and progression of Huntington's disease
A study led by Wolfram Hinzen, ICREA research professor with the Department of Translation and Language Sciences, published in Journal of Communication Disorders, shows that the first symptoms of the disease are revealed through linguistic changes in spontaneous speech. (2020-02-20)
Hate speech dominates social media platform when users want answers on terrorism
People often resort to using hate speech when searching about terrorism on a community social media platform, a study has found. (2020-02-20)
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