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Current Speech News and Events, Speech News Articles.
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Speech impairment in five-year-old international adoptees with cleft palate
In a group of internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate, speech at age five is impaired compared to a corresponding group of children born in Sweden, a study shows. (2019-09-06)
Sound deprivation in one ear leads to speech recognition difficulties
Chronic conductive hearing loss, which can result from middle-ear infections, has been linked to speech recognition deficits, according to the results of a new study of 240 patients, led by scientists at Massachusetts Eye and Ear. (2019-09-06)
Study locates brain areas for understanding metaphors in healthy and schizophrenic people
Scientists have used MRI scanners to discover the parts of the brain which understand metaphors, in both healthy volunteers and people with schizophrenia. (2019-09-06)
Similar information rates across languages, despite divergent speech rates
Spanish may seem to be spoken at a higher speed than Vietnamese, but that doesn't make it any more 'efficient'. (2019-09-05)
Study shows the social benefits of political incorrectness
Using politically incorrect speech can incite controversy but also brings social benefits: It's a powerful way to appear authentic. (2019-09-05)
Autism study stresses importance of communicating with all infants
A new study from a UT Dallas assistant professor affiliated with the Infant Brain Imaging Study network that included infants later diagnosed with autism suggests that all children benefit from exposure to rich speech environments from their caregivers. (2019-09-04)
Research finds extreme elitism, social hierarchy among Gab users
Despite its portrayal as a network that 'champions free speech,' users of the social media platform Gab display more extreme social hierarchy and elitism when compared to Twitter users, according to a new study published in the September edition of the online journal First Monday. (2019-09-01)
Map of broken brain networks shows why people lose speech in language-based dementia
Scientists have drawn a map that illustrates three regions in the brain of people with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) that fail to talk to each other, inhibiting a person's speech production, word finding and word comprehension. (2019-09-01)
New findings on human speech recognition at TU Dresden
Neuroscientists at TU Dresden were able to prove that speech recognition in humans begins in the sensory pathways from the ear to the cerebral cortex and not, as previously assumed, exclusively in the cerebral cortex itself. (2019-08-28)
Babbling babies' behavior changes parents' speech
New research shows baby babbling changes the way parents speak to their infants, suggesting that infants are shaping their own learning environments. (2019-08-21)
A map of the brain can tell what you're reading
UC Berkeley neuroscientists have created interactive maps that can predict where different categories of words activate the brain. (2019-08-19)
Variation in the shape of speech organs influences language evolution
Why do speech sounds vary across languages? Does the shape of our speech organs play a role? (2019-08-19)
NIH study in mice identifies type of brain cell involved in stuttering
Researchers believe that stuttering -- a potentially lifelong and debilitating speech disorder -- stems from problems with the circuits in the brain that control speech, but precisely how and where these problems occur is unknown. (2019-08-19)
One therapy bests others at motivating kids with autism to speak, Stanford study finds
Pivotal response treatment involving parents works better than other existing therapies at motivating children with autism and significant speech delays to talk, according to the results of a large study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2019-08-06)
'Fake news,' diminishing media trust and the role of social media
Exploring the perception of the 'fake news' phenomenon is critical to combating the ongoing global erosion of trust in the media according to a study co-authored by a University of Houston researcher. (2019-08-01)
Artificial throat could someday help mute people 'speak'
Most people take speech for granted, but it's actually a complex process that involves both motions of the mouth and vibrations of folded tissues, called vocal cords, within the throat. (2019-07-24)
Frog in your throat? Stress might be to blame for vocal issues
A researcher from the University of Missouri has found that there is more to vocal issues than just feeling nervous and that stress-induced brain activations might be to blame. (2019-07-24)
how the brain distinguishes between voice and sound
Is the brain capable of distinguishing a voice from phonemes? (2019-07-17)
Study questions if tongue-tie surgery for breastfeeding is always needed
New research raises questions as to whether too many infants are getting tongue-tie and lip tether surgery (also called frenulectomy) to help improve breastfeeding, despite limited medical evidence supporting the procedure. (2019-07-11)
How does playing with other children affect toddlers' language learning?
Toddlers are surprisingly good at processing the speech of other young children, according to a new study. (2019-07-10)
CCNY experts in lateralization of speech publish discovery
City College of New York-led researchers have published a breakthrough in understanding previously unknown inner workings related to the lateralization of speech processing in the brain. (2019-07-01)
Music develops the spoken language of the hearing-impaired
Finnish researchers have compiled guidelines for international use for utilising music to support the development of spoken language. (2019-06-27)
Scientists closer to unraveling mechanisms of speech processing in the brain
A new study that sheds light on how the brain processes language could lead to a better understanding of autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia and other neurodevelopmental conditions. (2019-06-25)
Analyzing the tweets of Republicans and Democrats
New research examined how Republicans and Democrats express themselves online in an attempt to understand how polarization of beliefs occurs on social media. (2019-06-25)
Screams contain a 'calling card' for the vocalizer's identity
Listeners can correctly identify whether pairs of screams were produced by the same person or two different people -- a critical prerequisite to individual recognition. (2019-06-24)
One class in all languages
Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report a new machine translation system that outputs subtitles in multiple languages for archived university lectures. (2019-06-14)
Small cluster of neurons is off-on switch for mouse songs
Researchers at Duke University have isolated a cluster of neurons in a mouse's brain that are crucial to making the squeaky, ultrasonic 'songs' a male mouse produces when courting a potential mate. (2019-06-14)
Sensing food textures is a matter of pressure
Food's texture affects whether it is eaten, liked or rejected, according to Penn State researchers, who say some people are better at detecting even minor differences in consistency because their tongues can perceive particle sizes. (2019-06-13)
Hearing through your fingers: Device that converts speech
A novel study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience provides the first evidence that a simple and inexpensive non-invasive speech-to-touch sensory substitution device has the potential to improve hearing in hearing-impaired cochlear implant patients, as well as individuals with normal hearing, to better discern speech in various situations like learning a second language or trying to deal with the 'cocktail party effect.' The device can provide immediate multisensory enhancement without any training. (2019-06-03)
Do you hear what I hear?
A new study by Columbia University researchers found that infants at high risk for autism were less attuned to differences in speech patterns than low-risk infants. (2019-05-24)
Coherent? Voice disorders significantly affect listeners, too
Researchers conducted a study to see if there are differences in speech intelligibility (a listener's ability to recover a speaker's message) in healthy voices compared to those who have voice disorders like hoarseness. (2019-05-15)
Experimental brain-controlled hearing aid decodes, identifies who you want to hear
Our brains have a remarkable knack for picking out individual voices in a noisy environment, like a crowded coffee shop or a busy city street. (2019-05-15)
User-friendly smartphone platform sounds out possible ear infections in children
Scientists have created a user-friendly smartphone-based platform that can quickly detect the presence of fluid in the middle ear -- a likely indicator of ear infections -- in children. (2019-05-15)
Hearing device separates simultaneous voices, amplifies the 'target' speaker
Picking out one voice from many at a crowded party is a challenge for assistive hearing devices. (2019-05-15)
Arts education can provide creative counter narratives against hate speech
Hate, as an emotion, is not an efficient response to ideological hate speech. (2019-05-14)
Illinois research team introduces wearable audio dataset
Researchers studying wearable listening technology now have a new data set to use, thanks to a team from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (2019-05-14)
Speech recognition technology is not a solution for poor readers
Could artificial intelligence be a solution for people who cannot read well (functional illiterates) or cannot read at all (complete illiterates)? (2019-05-13)
Want to expand your toddler's vocabulary? Find another child
Children glean all kinds of information from the people around them. (2019-05-13)
Researchers create standardized measurement for pediatric facial palsy
An international team of researchers has developed a standardized measurement for pediatric facial palsy that will improve the care for current and future patients with the condition. (2019-05-09)
Learning language
When it comes to learning a language, the left side of the brain has traditionally been considered the hub of language processing. (2019-05-07)
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