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Current Spiders News and Events, Spiders News Articles.
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Scientists discover why tarantulas come in vivid blues and greens
Researchers from Yale-NUS College and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) find support for new hypotheses: that tarantulas' vibrant blue colours may be used to communicate between potential mates, while green colouration confers the ability to conceal among foliage. (2020-09-24)
Giant spider provides promise of pain relief for irritable bowel syndrome
Molecules from the venom of one of the world's largest spiders could help University of Queensland-led researchers tailor pain blockers for people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). (2020-09-20)
A new species of spider
During a research stay in the highlands of Colombia conducted as part of her doctorate, Charlotte Hopfe, PhD student at the University of Bayreuth, has discovered and zoologically described a new species of spider. (2020-09-16)
Flies and mosquitoes beware, here comes the slingshot spider
Running into an unseen spiderweb in the woods can be scary enough, but what if you had to worry about a spiderweb - and the spider - being catapulted at you? (2020-08-17)
Insect diversity boosted by combination of crop diversity and semi-natural habitats
To enhance the number of beneficial insect species in agricultural land, preserving semi-natural habitats and promoting crop diversity are both needed, according to new research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied of Ecology. (2020-08-13)
How Venus flytraps snap
Venus flytraps catch spiders and insects by snapping their trap leaves. (2020-07-10)
Spider silk made by photosynthetic bacteria
A research team in Japan reported that they succeeded in producing the spider silk -- ultra-lightweight, though, biodegradable and biocompatible material -- using photosynthetic bacteria. (2020-07-08)
Researchers from University of Turku have described over 40 new species in 2020
The researchers at the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku are specialised in studying poorly known species habiting some of the most remote places on earth. (2020-07-01)
Spider silk can create lenses useful for biological imaging
Spider silk is useful for a variety of biomedical applications: It exhibits mechanical properties superior to synthetic fibers for tissue engineering, and it is not toxic or harmful to living cells. (2020-06-30)
Spider baby boom in a warmer Arctic
Climate change leads to longer growing seasons in the Arctic. (2020-06-25)
What makes a giant jellyfish's sting deadly
With summer on the way, and some beaches reopening after COVID-19 shutdowns, people will be taking to the ocean to cool off on a hot day. (2020-06-10)
Peculiar behavior of the beetle Toramus larvae
When studying the larval morphology of Toramini (Coleoptera: Erotylidae) we found that larvae of the genus Toramus attach their exuviae to their distal abdomen, with each exuvia from the preceding instar attached to the next to form a vertical pile. (2020-05-21)
Following the insect meltdown, numbers of orb web spiders have drastically declined
The abundance of large orb web spiders in the Swiss midland has declined drastically over the last 40 years. (2020-04-23)
Spider combs tame unruly nanofibers (video)
Cribellate spiders spin thousands of tiny nanofibers into sticky threads. (2020-04-22)
Stream pollution from mountaintop mining doesn't stay put in the water
Since the 1980s, a mountaintop mine in West Virginia has been leaching selenium into nearby streams at levels deemed unsafe for aquatic life. (2020-04-06)
Paleontology: Fossil trove sheds light on ancient antipodean ecology
The oldest known animals and plants preserved in amber from Southern Gondwana are reported in Scientific Reports this week. (2020-04-02)
Untangling the social lives of spiders
Scientists begin to unravel the genetic mechanism by which a solitary spider becomes a social one. (2020-03-31)
Gene loss more important in animal kingdom evolution than previously thought
Scientists have shown that some key points of animal evolution -- like the ones leading to humans or insects -- were associated with a large loss of genes in the genome. (2020-02-27)
Early worm lost lower limbs for tube-dwelling lifestyle
Scientists have discovered the earliest known example of an animal evolving to lose body parts it no longer needed. (2020-02-27)
Freshwater insects recover while spiders decline in UK
Many insects, mosses and lichens in the UK are bucking the trend of biodiversity loss, according to a comprehensive analysis of over 5,000 species led by UCL and the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH), and published in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2020-02-17)
Orb-weaver spiders' yellow and black pattern helps them lure prey
Being inconspicuous might seem the best strategy for spiders to catch potential prey in their webs, but many orb-web spiders, which hunt in this way, are brightly coloured. (2020-02-11)
French mathematician and spider aficionado Cédric Villani honoured with a new orb-weaver
Considered as one of the best studied spiders, the orb-weavers remain poorly known in the central parts of the Palearctic ecozone. (2020-02-03)
Global study finds predators are most likely to be lost when habitats are converted for human use
A first of its kind, global study on the impacts of human land-use on different groups of animals has found that predators, especially small invertebrates like spiders and ladybirds, are the most likely to be lost when natural habitats are converted to agricultural land or towns and cities. (2020-01-21)
New study reveals a life aquatic for many spider species
Researchers at the California Academy of Sciences and William Paterson University found that nearly one fifth of all spider families are associated with saltwater or freshwater aquatic habitats. (2020-01-21)
Cave fights for food: Voracious spiders vs. assassin bugs
Killing and eating of potential competitors has rarely been documented in the zoological literature, even though this type of interaction can affect population dynamics. (2020-01-20)
New parasitoid wasp species discovered in the Amazon -- can manipulate host's behavior
A research group from the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku studies the diversity of parasitoid insects around the world. (2020-01-14)
The mathematics of prey detection in spider orb-webs
Spider webs are one of nature's most fascinating manifestations. Many spiders extrude proteinaceous silk to weave sticky webs that ensnare unsuspecting prey who venture into their threads. (2019-12-12)
Gardens can be havens for soil animals in towns and cities
The fifth edition of the Dutch Soil Animal Days saw earthworms almost grab top spot thanks to the wet autumn weather. (2019-12-12)
'Safety signals' may help slow down anxiety
For as many as one in three people, life events or situations that pose no real danger can spark a disabling fear, a hallmark of anxiety and stress-related disorders. (2019-12-09)
Tiny woodlands are more important than previously thought
Small woodlands in farmland have more benefits for humans per area, compared to large forests according to a new study. (2019-12-02)
Spiders and ants inspire a metallic structure that refuses to sink
University of Rochester researchers have created a metallic structure that is so hydrophobic, it refuses to sink - no matter how often it is forced into water or how much it is damaged or punctured. (2019-11-06)
Helpful insects and landscape changes
We might not notice them, but the crops farmers grow are protected by scores of tiny invertebrate bodyguards. (2019-11-05)
Double-sided tape for tissues could replace surgical sutures
Inspired by a sticky substance spiders use to catch prey, MIT engineers designed a double-sided tape that can rapidly seal tissues together. (2019-10-30)
Hormonal contraceptives affect the efficacy of exposure therapy
Psychologists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have studied in what way hormonal contraceptives affect the efficacy of anxiety therapy. (2019-10-29)
Compact depth sensor inspired by spiders
Inspired by jumping spiders, researchers at the Harvard John A. (2019-10-28)
Forests on the radar
With freely available radar data from satellites, biodiversity in forests can be analysed very well. (2019-10-21)
Spider silk: A malleable protein provides reinforcement
Scientists from the University of Würzburg have discovered that spider silk contains an exceptional protein. (2019-09-26)
Half-a-billion-year-old tiny predator unveils the rise of scorpions and spiders
Two palaeontologists working on the world-renowned Burgess Shale have revealed a new species, called Mollisonia plenovenatrix, which is presented as the oldest chelicerate. (2019-09-11)
The Paleozoic diet: Why animals eat what they eat
In what likely is the first study on the evolution of dietary preferences across the animal kingdom, UA researchers report several unexpected discoveries, including that the first animal likely was a carnivore and that humans, along with other omnivores, belong to a rare breed. (2019-08-22)
Researchers find hurricanes drive the evolution of more aggressive spiders
Researchers at McMaster University who rush in after storms to study the behavior of spiders have found that extreme weather events such as tropical cyclones may have an evolutionary impact on populations living in storm-prone regions, where aggressive spiders have the best odds of survival. (2019-08-19)
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