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Current Spinal cord injury News and Events

Current Spinal cord injury News and Events, Spinal cord injury News Articles.
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First in-human study of drug targeting brain inflammation supports further development
MW189 blocks abnormal inflammation in the brain that is known to contribute to injury- and disease-induced neurologic impairments in a number of acute and chronic brain disorders. (2020-04-09)
Archaeology: Ancient string discovery sheds light on Neanderthal life
The discovery of the oldest known direct evidence of fiber technology -- using natural fibers to create yarn -- is reported in Scientific Reports this week. (2020-04-09)
Neanderthal cord weaver
Contrary to popular belief, Neanderthals were no less technologically advanced than Homo sapiens. (2020-04-09)
Alarming abusive head trauma revealed in computational simulation impact study
Abusive head trauma (AHT), like that of Shaken Baby Syndrome, is the leading cause of fatal brain injuries in children under two. (2020-04-09)
Mayo Clinic offer guidance on treating COVID-19 patients with signs of acute heart attack
Much remains unknown about COVID-19, but many studies already have indicated that people with cardiovascular disease are at greater risk of COVID-19. (2020-04-09)
Neuropsychological and psychological methods are essential
Clinical neuropsychology and psychology have evolved as diagnostic and treatment-oriented disciplines necessary for individuals with neurological, psychiatric, and medical conditions. (2020-04-08)
Off-the-shelf artificial cardiac patch repairs heart attack damage in rats, pigs
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed an 'off-the-shelf' artificial cardiac patch that can deliver cardiac cell-derived healing factors directly to the site of heart attack injury. (2020-04-08)
Some flowers have learned to bounce back after injury
Some flowers have a remarkable and previously unknown ability to bounce back after injury, according to a new study. (2020-04-07)
Common protein in skin can 'turn on' allergic itch
A commonly expressed protein in skin -- periostin -- can directly activate itch-associated neurons in the skin, according to new research. (2020-04-07)
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA): Newborn screening promises a benefit
The earliest possible diagnosis and treatment of infantile SMA through newborn screening leads to better motor development and less need for permanent ventilation as well as fewer deaths. (2020-04-06)
Men pose more risk to other road users than women
Men pose more risk to other road users than women do and they are more likely to drive more dangerous vehicles, reveals the first study of its kind, published online in the journal Injury Prevention. (2020-04-06)
Chilling concussed cells shows promise for full recovery
In the future, treating a concussion could be as simple as cooling the brain. (2020-04-02)
Mayo Clinic research finds spina bifida surgery before birth restores brain structure
Surgery performed on a fetus in the womb to repair defects from spina bifida triggers the body's ability to restore normal brain structure, Mayo Clinic research discovered. (2020-04-01)
Researchers reverse muscle fibrosis from overuse injury in animals, hope for human trials
High-force, high-repetition movements create microinjuries in muscle fibers. Muscle tissue responds by making repairs. (2020-03-30)
Cells must age for muscles to regenerate in muscle-degenerating diseases
Exercise can only improve strength in muscle-degenerating diseases when a specific type of muscle cell ages, report a Hokkaido University researcher and colleagues with Sapporo Medical University in Japan. (2020-03-30)
Unearthing gut secret paves way for targeted treatments
Scientists have identified a specific type of sensory nerve ending in the gut and how these communicate pain or discomfort to the brain, paving the way for targeted treatments for common conditions like ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome or chronic constipation. (2020-03-29)
Scientists identify gene that first slows, then accelerates, progression of ALS in mice
Columbia scientists have provided new insights into how mutations in a gene called TBK1 cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive neurodegenerative disease that robs patients of movement, speech and ultimately, their lives. (2020-03-27)
New 'more effective' stem cell transplant method could aid blood cancer patients
Researchers at UCL have developed a new way to make blood stem cells present in the umbilical cord 'more transplantable', a finding in mice which could improve the treatment of a wide range of blood diseases in children and adults. (2020-03-26)
Brain mapping study suggests motor regions for the hand also connect to the entire body
In a paper publishing March 26 in the journal Cell, investigators report that they have used microelectrode arrays implanted in human brains to map out motor functions down to the level of the single nerve cell. (2020-03-26)
How tissues harm themselves during wound healing
Researchers from Osaka University discovered that increased expression of Rbm7 in apoptotic tissue cells results in the recruitment of segregated-nucleus-containing atypical monocytes, leading to tissue fibrosis. (2020-03-25)
Changing how we think about warm perception
Perceiving warmth requires input from a surprising source: cool receptors. (2020-03-24)
Keeping lower back pain at bay: Exercises designed by Lithuanians are 3 times more efficient
Lithuanian scientists have devised a spinal stabilization exercise program for managing lower back pain for people who perform a sedentary job. (2020-03-23)
Stroke: When the system fails for the second time
After a stroke, there is an increased risk of suffering a second one. (2020-03-23)
Study sheds light on fatty acid's role in 'chemobrain' and multiple sclerosis
Medical experts have always known myelin, the protective coating of nerve cells, to be metabolically inert. (2020-03-23)
Kidney injury risks higher for hospitalized pregnant women
New research from the University of Cincinnati shows an increased rate of sudden episodes of kidney failure or damage in women who are hospitalized during pregnancy. (2020-03-18)
Getting groundbreaking medical technology out of the lab
New medical technologies hold immense promise for treating a range of conditions. (2020-03-16)
NCAM2 protein plays a decisive role in the formation of structures for cognitive learning
The molecule NCAM2, a glycoprotein from the superfamily of immunoglobulins, is a vital factor in the formation of the cerebral cortex, neuronal morphogenesis and formation of neuronal circuits in the brain, as stated in the new study published in the journal Cerebral Cortex. (2020-03-13)
The need for speed
Scientists at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bangalore show that parallel neural pathways that bypass the brain's tight frequency control enable animals to move faster. (2020-03-12)
New strategies for managing bowel and bladder dysfunction after spinal cord injury
Two complications have emerged as top priorities for spinal cord injury researchers -- neurogenic bowel and neurogenic bladder. (2020-03-12)
Combined tissue engineering provides new hope for spinal disc herniations
A promising new tissue engineering approach may one day improve outcomes for patients who have undergone discectomy -- the primary surgical remedy for spinal disc herniations. (2020-03-11)
Like patching a flat tire: New fix heals herniated discs
A new two-step technique to repair herniated discs uses hyaluronic acid gel to re-inflate the disc and collagen gel to seal the hole, essentially repairing ruptured discs like you'd repair a flat tire. (2020-03-11)
Sensing infection, suppressing regeneration
UIC researchers describe an enzyme that blocks the ability of blood vessel cells to self-heal. (2020-03-11)
Cycling to work linked to higher risk of injury-related hospitalization among UK commuters
Cycling to work is associated with a higher risk of admission to hospital for an injury than other modes of commuting, suggests a UK study published in The BMJ today. (2020-03-11)
New clinical trial examines a potential noninvasive solution for overactive bladders
Keck Medicine of USC urologists are launching a clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation in patients with an overactive bladder due to neurological conditions, such as a spinal cord injury or stroke, and idiopathic (unknown) causes. (2020-03-10)
Firearm violence solutions from a public health perspective
While firearm violence is a major public health challenge in the United States, it has often been considered a law enforcement issue with only law enforcement solutions. (2020-03-09)
Rejuvenating the immune system supports brain repair after injury
Researchers have identified a major shift in how to treat brain injuries, after rejuvenating immune cells to support the repair process. (2020-03-08)
Moderate-to-high posttraumatic stress common after exposure to trauma, violence
Over 30 percent of injury survivors who are treated in hospital emergency departments will have moderate-to-severe symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point in the first year following the initial incident, new research led by the Yale School of Public Health finds. (2020-03-06)
Boosting energy levels within damaged nerves may help them heal
When the spinal cord is injured, the damaged nerve fibers -- called axons -- are normally incapable of regrowth, leading to permanent loss of function. (2020-03-03)
IU scientists study link between energy levels, spinal cord injury
A team of researchers from Indiana University School of Medicine, in collaboration with the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, have investigated how boosting energy levels within damaged nerve fibers or axons may represent a novel therapeutic direction for axonal regeneration and functional recovery. (2020-03-03)
Drug shows promise in reducing deadly brain swelling after stroke
Cases of potentially deadly brain damage as a result of stroke could be reduced after new research identified a pathway in the brain that causes swelling, and which responds to an innovative treatment. (2020-03-02)
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