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Current Spinal cord News and Events

Current Spinal cord News and Events, Spinal cord News Articles.
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Dementia and eating disorders: it is a problem of (semantic) memory
Eating disorders shown by patients with dementia are characterised by a vast range of behaviours that span from preference for sugary foods, binges, increase in appetite, to changes in table manners or in food preferences. (2019-10-17)
Scientists identify genetic variation linked to severity of ALS
A discovery made several years ago in a lab researching asthma at Wake Forest School of Medicine may now have implications for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a disease with no known cure and only two FDA-approved drugs to treat its progression and severity. (2019-10-16)
The brain does not follow the head
The human brain is about three times the size of the brains of great apes. (2019-10-15)
Researchers identify brain protein that promotes maintenance of chronic pain
Study results illuminate the potential of novel approach for the treatment of chronic pain. (2019-10-11)
TTUHSC study shows brain mechanisms have potential to block arthritis pain
Because pain is a complex condition, treating it efficiently continues to pose challenge for physicians. (2019-10-10)
The effectiveness of electrical stimulation in producing spinal fusion
Researchers from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of published data on the effect of electrical stimulation therapies on spinal fusion. (2019-10-08)
UVA discovers surprise contributor to multiple sclerosis
The discovery suggests new avenues for devising treatments and is a vital step toward finding a cure. (2019-10-07)
Soft robot programmed to move like an inchworm
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have created a miniature robot that can crawl with inchworm-like motion. (2019-10-07)
Targeting certain rogue T cells prevents and reverses multiple sclerosis in mice
Multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disorder, is known to be driven by 'helper' T cells, white blood cells that mount an inflammatory attack on the brain and spinal cord. (2019-10-04)
Major NIH grant will support early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease via skin testing
An expert team from Case Western Reserve University has received a five-year, $3.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for diagnosing Parkinson's disease (PD) via an innovative skin testing approach. (2019-10-04)
Golden ratio observed in human skulls
The Golden Ratio, described by Leonardo da Vinci and Luca Pacioli as the Divine Proportion, is an infinite number often found in nature, art and mathematics. (2019-10-03)
The Lancet Neurology: Pioneering study suggests that an exoskeleton for tetraplegia could be feasible
A whole-body exoskeleton, operated by recording and decoding brain signals, has helped a tetraplegic patient to move all four of his paralysed limbs, according to results of a 2-year trial published in The Lancet Neurology journal. (2019-10-03)
Researchers identify molecular process that could accelerate recovery from nerve injuries
Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered a molecular process that controls the rate at which nerves grow both during embryonic development and recovery from injury throughout life. (2019-10-02)
Cerebral reperfusion of reading network predicts recovery of reading ability after stroke
'Our findings support the utility of cerebral perfusion as a biomarker for recovery after stroke,' said Dr. (2019-10-01)
Doctor offers unique perspective as father of a child with rare genetic disease
From a professional standpoint, Nathan Hoot, MD, Ph.D., understands the value of medical research that leads to new, groundbreaking drugs in the treatment of rare diseases. (2019-10-01)
'Relaxed' enzymes may be at the root of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease
Treatments have been hard to pinpoint for a rare neurological disease called Charcot-Marie-Tooth, in part because so many variations of the condition exist. (2019-09-30)
Genomic map implicates broad immune cell involvement in multiple sclerosis
In a study of 115,803 individuals, the authors have identified 233 sites or loci in the human genome that contribute to the onset of MS. (2019-09-26)
Inflammation amps up neurite growth, gene expression involved in heat, cold sensitivity
Inflammation increases neuronal activity, gene expression and sensory nerve (neurite) outgrowth in neurons involved in thermal -- but not physical- sensations in mice. (2019-09-26)
Researchers perform thousands of mutations to understand amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Researchers from IBEC and CRG in Barcelona use a technique called high-throughput mutagenesis to study Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), with unexpected results. (2019-09-23)
Neurological signals from the spinal cord surprise scientists
With a study of the network between nerve and muscle cells in turtles, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have gained new insight into the way in which movements are generated and maintained. (2019-09-19)
Imaging reveals new results from landmark stem cell trial for stroke
Researchers led by Sean I. Savitz, M.D., at UTHealth Houston reported today in the journal Stem Cells that bone marrow cells used to treat ischemic stroke in an expanded Phase I trial were not only safe and feasible, but also resulted in enhanced recovery compared to a matched historical control group. (2019-09-17)
No difference in pain response between SBRT and conventional RT for patients with spinal metastases
A Phase III, NRG Oncology clinical trial that compared radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to the conventional radiotherapy (cEBRT) for patients with spinal metastases indicated that there was no statistically significant difference between the treatments for pain response, adverse events, FACT-G, BPI, and EQ-5D scores. (2019-09-16)
Dynamic reorganization of brain circuit with post-stroke rehabilitation
Nagoya City University researchers have revealed an interaction between cortico-brainstem pathways during training-induced recovery in stroke model rats. (2019-09-11)
How emotion affects action
During high stress situations such as making a goal in soccer, some athletes experience a rapid decline in performance under pressure, known as 'choking.' Now, Salk Institute researchers have uncovered what might be behind the phenomenon: one-way signals from the brain's emotion circuit to the movement circuit. (2019-09-10)
The birth of vision, from the retina to the brain
How do neurons differentiate to become individual components of the visual system? (2019-09-09)
Precious metal flecks could be catalyst for better cancer therapies
Tiny extracts of a precious metal used widely in industry could play a vital role in new cancer therapies. (2019-09-09)
New research provides hope for people living with chronic pain
Dr. Gerald Zamponi, Ph.D., and a team with the Cumming School of Medicine's Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI) and researchers at Stanford University, California, have been investigating which brain circuits are changed by injury, in order to develop targeted therapies to reset the brain to stop chronic pain. (2019-09-09)
Researchers find regulator of first responder cells to brain injury
Researchers identified nuclear factor I-A (NFIA) as a central regulator of both the generation and activity of reactive astrocytes. (2019-09-09)
New insight into motor neuron death mechanisms could be a step toward ALS treatment
Researchers have made an important advance toward understanding why certain cells in the nervous system are prone to breaking down and dying, which is what happens in patients with ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders. (2019-09-04)
Emotion recognition deficits impede community integration after traumatic brain injury
Dr. Helen Genova: 'Our findings suggest that deficits in facial emotion recognition may contribution to the social isolation experienced by so many people with traumatic brain injury. (2019-08-30)
AAN issues guideline on vaccines and multiple sclerosis
Can a person with multiple sclerosis (MS) get regular vaccines? (2019-08-28)
Survey reveals skyrocketing interest in marijuana and cannabinoids for pain
Millennials lead the escalating interest in marijuana and cannabinoid compounds for managing pain -- with older generations not far behind -- yet most are unaware of potential risks. (2019-08-26)
New approaches to heal injured nerves
Injuries to nerve fibers in the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves usually result in functional losses as the nerve fibers are unable to regenerate. (2019-08-23)
Scratching the surface of how your brain senses an itch
Light touch plays a critical role in everyday tasks, such as picking up a glass or playing a musical instrument, as well as for detecting the touch of, say, biting insects. (2019-08-22)
Promising gene replacement therapy moves forward at Ohio State
Research led by Dr. Krystof Bankiewicz, who recently joined The Ohio State University College of Medicine, shows that gene replacement therapy for Niemann-Pick type A disease is safe for use in nonhuman primates and has therapeutic effects in mice. (2019-08-21)
Scientists discover why brown fat is good for people's health
Rutgers and other scientists have discovered how brown fat, also known as brown adipose tissue, may help protect against obesity and diabetes. (2019-08-21)
Multi-tasking protein at the root of neuropathic pain
Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition resulting from nerve injury and is characterized by increased pain sensitivity. (2019-08-20)
Single protein plays important dual transport roles in the brain
Edwin Chapman of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the University of Wisconsin-Madison reports that halting production of synaptotagmin 17 (syt-17) blocks growth of axons. (2019-08-19)
Guidelines for managing severe traumatic brain injury continue to evolve
New evidence continues to drive the evolution of guideline recommendations for the medical management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). (2019-08-16)
Enterovirus antibodies detected in acute flaccid myelitis patients
A new study analyzing samples from patients with and without acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) provides additional evidence for an association between the rare but often serious condition that causes muscle weakness and paralysis, and infection with non-polio enteroviruses. (2019-08-13)
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