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Current Spinal cord News and Events, Spinal cord News Articles.
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Tiny mineral particles are better vehicles for promising gene therapy
University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have developed a safer and more efficient way to deliver a promising new method for treating cancer and liver disorders and for vaccination -- including a COVID-19 vaccine from Moderna Therapeutics that has advanced to clinical trials with humans. (2020-07-02)
Abnormal proteins in the gut could contribute to the development of Alzheimer's Disease
A new study published in The Journal of Physiology has shown that misfolded protein build-up in the gut could contribute to the development of Alzheimer's-like symptoms in mice. (2020-07-02)
Research finds new approach to treating certain neurological diseases
A team led by Case Western Reserve University medical researchers has developed a potential treatment method for Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD), a fatal neurological disorder that produces severe movement, motor and cognitive dysfunction in children. (2020-07-01)
Financial conflicts of interest are often not disclosed in spinal surgery journals
Many studies published by major spinal surgery journals do not include full disclosure of researchers' financial conflicts of interest (COIs), reports a study in Spine. (2020-07-01)
More than medicine: Pain-relief drug delivers choices for mothers in labor
Choice and control are important factors for ensuring a positive childbirth experience, yet until recently, little was known about the impact of alternative administrations of fentanyl -- one of the pain relief drugs used during labour- on both mother and baby. (2020-06-30)
Lifting weights makes your nervous system stronger, too
Gym-goers may get frustrated when they don't see results from weightlifting right away, but their efforts are not in vain: the first few weeks of training strengthen the nervous system, not muscles. (2020-06-29)
Synaptic variability provides adaptability for rhythmic motor pattern
From snail to man, one of the most common features in behavior is arguably the variability of motor acts--for example, a soccer player evading an opponent. (2020-06-19)
Hookworm trial offers new hope to MS patients
Parasitic worms could offer a new treatment hope for patients suffering from the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis, according to experts from the University of Nottingham. (2020-06-18)
Simple blood test could one day diagnose motor neurone disease
Scientists at the University of Sussex have identified a potential pattern within blood which signals the presence of motor neuron disease; a discovery which could significantly improve diagnosis. (2020-06-17)
Evidence lacking for drug treatment of multiple sclerosis-related cognitive impairment
There was insufficient evidence for cognitive efficacy across the spectrum of pharmacologic agents used in multiple sclerosis. (2020-06-17)
Experts analyze options for treating multiple sclerosis-related cognitive impairment
'Evidence suggests that cognitive rehabilitation is effective in MS-related cognitive dysfunction, and may confer long-lasting effects,' said Dr. (2020-06-16)
Time-saving high-intensity workouts can benefit people with spinal cord injuries
Research from the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University has found that the practical advantages of high-intensity interval training (HIIT), or short bursts of all-out exercise, could be especially beneficial for people who have experienced spinal cord injuries (SCI). (2020-06-11)
Researchers model human stem cells to identify degeneration in glaucoma
More than 3 million Americans have glaucoma, a serious eye condition causing vision loss. (2020-06-11)
Treat early or wait? Experts ponder best way to manage milder forms of spinal muscular atrophy
The advent of therapeutic interventions for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has increased the importance of presymptomatic diagnosis and treatment. (2020-06-11)
COVID-19 threatens the entire nervous system
A new review of neurological symptoms of COVID-19 patients in current scientific literature reveals the disease poses a global threat to the entire nervous system. (2020-06-11)
Scientists identify ancient origin for key hormone system
A key set of proteins that help regulate hormones necessary for many essential functions in humans and other vertebrates have ancient origins in much simpler creatures such as sea cucumbers, says a new study published today in eLife. (2020-06-09)
Researchers develop 3D-printable material that mimics biological tissues
University of Colorado Denver researchers are the first to 3D print a complex, porous lattice structure using liquid crystal elastomers creating devices that can mimic cartilage and other biological tissues. (2020-06-08)
Cord blood for stem cell transplant may outperform matched sibling donor
Study based on a decade of research and treatment shows no difference in overall survival between cord blood and matched related donor as source for stem cell transplant, with reduced graft-versus-host disease in patients using cord blood. (2020-06-05)
Squid studies illuminate neural dysfunction in ALS; suggest new route to therapy
Yuyu Song of Harvard Medical School was a Grass Fellow at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) when she took advantage of a powerful research organism in neuroscience, the local squid, to start asking how a mutant protein associated with familial ALS behaves under controlled conditions. (2020-06-01)
Revealing how flies make decisions on the fly to survive
Many insects process visual information to make decisions about controlling their flying skills and movements- flies must decide whether to pursue prey, avoid a predator, maintain their flight trajectory or land based on their perceptions. (2020-05-28)
How preserve the properties of polyphenols and flavonoids in oncological treatments?
A new technique preserves the anti-carcinogenic properties of polyphenols and flavonoids in oncological treatments. (2020-05-27)
Framework helps clinicians identify serious spinal pathology
Rehabilitation clinicians and other health care professionals now have a framework for assessing and managing people who may have serious spinal pathologies. (2020-05-27)
It may take up to a year to get through elective surgeries due to COVID-19
A new study by Johns Hopkins researchers found that it may take between seven and 16 months for surgeons to complete the backlog of elective orthopaedic surgeries that have been suspended during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-05-26)
New studies reveal extent and risks of laughing gas & stimulant abuse among young people
In one study, researchers from Turkey reported increasing stimulant use among medical students approaching their final exams, despite the substantial risks to their health. (2020-05-23)
Brain's 'updating mechanisms' may create false memories
The research, published in Current Biology, is one of the first comprehensive characterizations of poorly formed memories and may offer a framework to explore different therapeutic approaches to fear, memory and anxiety disorders. (2020-05-21)
Tick-borne encephalitis spread across Eurasia with settlers and their pets and prey
Researchers from Sechenov University together with colleagues from several Russian institutes analysed data on the RNA structure of tick-borne encephalitis virus. (2020-05-21)
Cutting edge two-photon microscopy system breaks new grounds in retinal imaging
In a recent breakthrough, a team of HKUST scientists developed an adaptive optics two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy using direct wavefront sensing for high-resolution in vivo fluorescence imaging of mouse retina, which allow in vivo fundus imaging at an unprecedented resolution after full AO correction. (2020-05-20)
Cord blood study provides insights on benefits, limitations for autism treatment
In a recent study, Duke researchers tested whether a single infusion of a unit of a child's own or donor cord blood could improve social communication skills in children between the ages of 2-7 diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. (2020-05-19)
Not all multiple sclerosis-like diseases are alike
Scientists say some myelin-damaging disorders have a distinctive pathology that groups them into a unique disease entity. (2020-05-18)
One in ten patients with major vascular event, infection, or cancer will be misdiagnosed
According to a new study published in De Gruyter's open access journal Diagnosis, approximately one in 10 people (9.6%) in the United States with symptoms caused by major vascular events, infections, or cancers will be misdiagnosed. (2020-05-15)
'Cell pores' discovery gives hope to millions of brain and spinal cord injury patients
Scientists have discovered a new treatment to dramatically reduce swelling after brain and spinal cord injuries, offering hope to 75 million victims worldwide each year. (2020-05-14)
Developing microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) for inoperable cancer
An innovative radiation treatment that could one day be a valuable addition to conventional radiation therapy for inoperable brain and spinal tumors is a step closer, thanks to new research led by University of Saskatchewan (USask) researchers at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). (2020-05-13)
Scientists show MRI predicts the efficacy of a stem cell therapy for brain injury
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and Loma Linda University Health have demonstrated the promise of applying magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to predict the efficacy of using human neural stem cells to treat a brain injury -- a first-ever 'biomarker' for regenerative medicine that could help personalize stem cell treatments for neurological disorders and improve efficacy. (2020-05-12)
Researchers find the 'brain's steering wheel' in the brainstem of mice
In a new study in mice, neuroscientists from the University of Copenhagen have found neurons in the brain that control how the mice turn right and left. (2020-05-12)
Bioethicist calls out unproven and unlicensed 'stem cell treatments' for COVID-19
As the COVID-19 pandemic enters its third month, businesses in the United States are marketing unlicensed and unproven stem-cell-based 'therapies' and exosome products that claim to prevent or treat the disease. (2020-05-07)
NUS researchers develop novel device to improve performance of underactive bladders
Researchers from NUS and the University of Tokyo have developed a new device that can monitor bladder volume in real-time and effectively empty the bladder. (2020-05-05)
Electrical activity in living organisms mirrors electrical fields in atmosphere
A new Tel Aviv University study provides evidence for a direct link between electrical fields in the atmosphere and those found in living organisms, including humans. (2020-05-05)
University of Arizona researchers identify potential pathway to make opioids safer, more effective
Researchers from the UArizona College of Medicine -- Tucson Department of Pharmacology found that inhibiting heat shock protein 90 in the spinal cord enhanced the efficacy of morphine -- a finding that could be used decrease the adverse side effects of opioid therapy. (2020-05-05)
Temple scientists regenerate neurons in mice with spinal cord injury and optic nerve damage
Each year thousands of patients face life-long losses in sensation and motor function from spinal cord injury and related conditions in which axons are badly damaged or severed. (2020-04-30)
Rat spinal cords control neural function in biobots
Biological robots draw inspiration from natural systems to mimic the motions of organisms, such as swimming or jumping. (2020-04-28)
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