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Current Spinal cord News and Events

Current Spinal cord News and Events, Spinal cord News Articles.
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Study shows promise in repairing damaged myelin
A new study shows that a synthetic molecule developed by Oregon Health & Science University scientists stimulates repair of the protective sheath that covers nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. (2019-04-18)
Fish that outlived dinosaurs reveals secrets of ancient skull evolution
A new study into one of the world's oldest types of fish, coelacanth, provides fresh insights into the development of the skull and brain of vertebrates and the evolution of lobe-finned fishes and land animals, as published in Nature. (2019-04-17)
Coelacanth reveals new insights into skull evolution
An international team of researchers presents the first observations of the development of the skull and brain in the living coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae. (2019-04-17)
Simple test can indicate prolonged symptoms following pediatric sports-related concussion
Researchers from Children's Hospital Colorado and the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, Colorado, have found that abnormal performance on the Romberg balance test can indicate that children and adolescents will experience prolonged symptoms following sports-related concussion. (2019-04-16)
MU neurobiologists annotate critical neuronal proteins in lamprey genome
The lamprey, an eel-like primitive vertebrate, is a popular organism for neurobiology studies because it has a relatively simple nervous system. (2019-04-15)
Kennedy Krieger research scientist explores Leonardo da Vinci's knowledge of the brain
Jonathan Pevsner, PhD, professor and research scientist at the Kennedy Krieger Institute, wrote an article featured in the April edition of The Lancet titled, 'Leonardo da Vinci's studies of the brain.' In the piece, Pevsner highlights the exquisite drawings and curiosity, dedication and scientific rigor that led Leonardo to make penetrating insights into how the brain functions. (2019-04-11)
Active lifestyles may help nerves to heal after spinal injuries
Leading an active lifestyle may increase the likelihood of damaged nerves regenerating after a spinal cord injury. (2019-04-10)
Physical activity prepares neurons to regenerate in case of spinal cord injury
The influence of an active lifestyle on the regenerative capacity of the peripheral nervous system, that is, the set of cranial and spinal nerves that control motor and sensory functions, is described here for the first time, explains Ángel Barco, who has led the participation of the Institute of Neurosciences UMH-CSIC, in Alicante, in this international study. (2019-04-10)
Famous cancer-fighting gene also protects against birth defects
New research has revealed how the famous tumour suppressor gene p53 is surprisingly critical for development of the neural tube in female embryos. (2019-04-09)
From spinal cord injury to recovery
Spinal cord injury disconnects communication between the brain and the spinal cord, disrupting control over part of the body. (2019-04-08)
Migraine-linked protein exhibits sex-specific pain effects
A protein implicated in the development of migraine symptoms caused pain responses in female rodents, but not in males, when introduced into the meninges, potentially helping to explain why migraine is three times more common in women than men. (2019-04-08)
Study: Protein key to charcot-marie-tooth, other nerve diseases
A new study provides critical insight into a little-known, yet relatively common, inherited neurological condition called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. (2019-04-04)
New ALS gene expression atlas offers unprecedented detail into disease progression
ALS researchers at the New York Genome Center have utilized new technologies for mapping gene expression in spinal cord samples that provide new insights into the mechanisms that contribute to disease onset and progression in ALS patients. (2019-04-04)
How ALS progresses on genetic and cellular level revealed by high-res spinal cord study
Precise experiments have revealed for the first time how Lou Gehrig's disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), progresses on a genetic and cellular level. (2019-04-04)
Microglia, cells thought restricted to central nervous system, are redefined in new study
Scientists at the University of Notre Dame discovered microglia actually squeeze through the spinal boundary, crossing into the peripheral nervous system in response to injury. (2019-04-04)
New hope for treating childhood brain cancer
Recent research has shown that a drug known as MI-2 can kill cells that cause a fatal brain cancer. (2019-04-04)
Experimental Biology highlights -- Cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and medical news
Embargoed press materials are now available for the Experimental Biology (EB) 2019 meeting, to be held in Orlando April 6-9. (2019-04-03)
Is adenosine the missing link in restless leg syndrome?
Researchers have identified a common mechanism implicating adenosine in the cause of restless leg syndrome (RLS) symptoms -- the periodic limb movements characteristic of RLS and the state of enhanced arousal that both disrupt sleep. (2019-04-03)
Tumor microenvironment analyzed to increase effectiveness of preclinical trials
It was shown that co-culturing HeLa adenocarcinoma cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mesenchymal stromal cells results in changes in the proliferative activity of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells and mesenchymal stromal cell populations. (2019-04-02)
Transplanted bone marrow endothelial progenitor cells delay ALS disease progression
Transplanting human bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells into mice mimicking symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) helped more motor neurons survive and slowed disease progression by repairing damage to the blood-spinal cord barrier, University of South Florida researchers report. (2019-04-02)
Awake lumbar interbody fusion
This article provides the reader with a glimpse of how effective lumbar surgery in select patients can be when performed without general anesthesia, open surgery, or a long convalescence in the hospital. (2019-04-01)
Enhanced recovery after spine surgery: 15 new articles in the April Neurosurgical Focus
The April issue of Neurosurgical Focus contains 15 new articles on the principles of enhanced recovery after surgery and how these principles relate to spine surgery. (2019-04-01)
Can a protein in cord blood predict risk of death, cerebral palsy in preterm infants?
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have found that some preterm babies born without haptoglobin, a protein in blood cells, have higher odds of brain bleeding, cerebral palsy and death. (2019-03-29)
Maternal diet during pregnancy may modulate the risk of ADHD symptoms in children
A study published in The Journal of Pediatrics suggest that the risk of a child developing symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be modulated by the mother's diet during pregnancy. (2019-03-28)
Transplanting adult spinal cord tissues: A new strategy of repair spinal cord injury
Spinal cord injury repair is one of the most challenging medical problems, and no effective therapeutic methods has been developed. (2019-03-27)
Southern Europeans, non-Europeans less likely to have matched stem cell donors
Although the pool of registered bone marrow donors has increased in recent years, a new study suggests that most people of southern-European and non-European descent are unlikely to have a suitable match if they need a life-saving bone marrow transplant. (2019-03-27)
Implant to better track brain chemical gone rogue after neurotrauma
Purdue University engineers have built a tiny, flexible sensor that is faster and more precise than past attempts at tracking a brain chemical elevated in brain diseases and neurotrauma. (2019-03-27)
Donor muscle training before transplantation expedites rehabilitation process in patients
Researchers at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience of the Higher School of Economics have proposed to train transplanted muscles in advance with new movements so that the brain can learn to use them more quickly after autotransplantation. (2019-03-27)
Sleep problems, Alzheimer's disease are linked, but which comes first?
A new article explores the pathophysiological factors that link sleep disturbances and Alzheimer's disease. (2019-03-22)
Like mountaineers, nerves need expert guidance to find their way
Similar to the dozens of Sherpas that guide hikers up treacherous Himalayan mountains to reach a summit, the nervous system relies on elaborate timing and location of guidance cues for neuronal axons--threadlike projections--to successfully reach their destinations in the body. (2019-03-22)
Bacteria in urine doesn't always indicate infection
Doctors should think carefully before testing patients for a urinary tract infection (UTI) to avoid over-diagnosis and unnecessary antibiotic treatment, according to updated asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. (2019-03-21)
Gene medication to help treat spinal cord injuries
The two-gene medication has been proven to recover motor functions in rats. (2019-03-18)
Meningitis changes immune cell makeup in the mouse brain lining
Meningitis, a group of serious diseases which infect the brain's lining, leaves its mark and can affect the body's ability to fight such infections in the future. (2019-03-18)
Novel methods for analyzing neural circuits for innate behaviors in insects
We established a method for activity-dependent visualization of neural circuits in the fruit fly brain. (2019-03-14)
Non-contrast MRI is effective in monitoring MS patients
Brain MRI without contrast agent is just as effective as the contrast-enhanced approach for monitoring disease progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study. (2019-03-12)
CT scan prior to spine fusion finds almost half of patients had undiagnosed osteoporosis
For patients contemplating spinal fusion surgery to alleviate pain, bone health is an important consideration. (2019-03-12)
Researchers decode how cancer drug works in brains of Parkinson's disease patients
The first arm of a phase II clinical trial by a research team at Georgetown University Medical Center testing the use of nilotinib in patients with Parkinson's disease demonstrates precisely how the agent increases levels of dopamine in the brains of study participants. (2019-03-12)
Spine evaluation is critical to reduce dislocations in revision total hip arthroplasty
A new assessment tool before revision hip replacement surgery has significantly reduced the rate of recurrent dislocations compared to a standard evaluation, according to a study at Hospital for Special Surgery. (2019-03-12)
Researchers aiming to cure spina bifida get a step closer to their goal
Researchers on the path to finding a cure for spina bifida have identified specific elements in stem cell secretions as key to protecting neurons and ultimately reducing the lower-limb paralysis associated with the birth defect. (2019-03-07)
New target for chronic pain relief confirmed by scientists
A research group at Hiroshima University observed a potential new target for chronic pain treatment. (2019-03-07)
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