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Current Spinal cord News and Events, Spinal cord News Articles.
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Study pinpoints cell types affected in brains of multiple sclerosis patients
Scientists have discovered that a specific brain cell known as a 'projection neuron' has a central role to play in the brain changes seen in multiple sclerosis (MS). (2019-07-17)
Gut microbes protect against neurologic damage from viral infections
Gut microbes produce compounds that prime immune cells to destroy harmful viruses in the brain and nervous system, according to a mouse study published today in eLife. (2019-07-16)
Researchers describe new ALS biomarkers, potential new drug targets
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have described unique populations of neurons and associated cells in the spinal cords of patients who died of ALS. (2019-07-15)
Despite long-term treatment, HIV persists in spinal fluid, linked to cognition problems
Even after nearly a decade of strict HIV treatment, cells sheltering the virus could be found in the cerebrospinal fluid of half of participants in a national clinical trial of people living with HIV. (2019-07-15)
HIV may affect the brain despite ongoing antiretroviral therapy
HIV-positive patients are living longer thanks to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but the virus can remain in some tissues, preventing a total cure. (2019-07-15)
Thwack! Insects feel chronic pain after injury
Scientists have known insects experience something like pain since 2003, but new research published today from Associate Professor Greg Neely and colleagues at the University of Sydney proves for the first time that insects also experience chronic pain that lasts long after an initial injury has healed. (2019-07-12)
Marathon-running molecule could speed up the race for new neurological treatments
Scientists at the University of Warwick have discovered a new process that sets the fastest molecular motor on its marathon-like runs through our neurons. (2019-07-12)
An itch to scratch: NCATS, NIDCR scientists identify potential approach to chronic problem
While scientists have some clues to the causes of troubling chronic itch, effective therapies have been elusive. (2019-07-12)
Are the 'viral' agents of MS, ALS and schizophrenia buried in our genome?
What if the missing 'environmental' factor in some of our deadliest neurological diseases were really written in our genome? (2019-07-11)
First step to induce self-repair in the central nervous system
Injured axons instruct Schwann cells to build specialized actin spheres to break down and remove axon fragments, thereby starting the regeneration process. (2019-07-11)
An 'EpiPen' for spinal cord injuries
An injection of nanoparticles can prevent the body's immune system from overreacting to trauma, potentially preventing some spinal cord injuries from resulting in paralysis. (2019-07-11)
Mathematical model explores daily rhythms in pain sensitivity
A new computational model successfully predicts how daily pain sensitivity rhythms affect pain processing, both in healthy adults and in people with neuropathic pain. (2019-07-11)
Caspase-1 initiates apoptosis, but not pyroptosis, in the absence of gasdermin D
Caspase-1 triggers programmed necrosis called pyroptosis by gasdermin-D (GSDMD) cleavage. (2019-07-05)
Discovery reveals prolific ability of Schwann cells to generate myelin
Scientists have discovered that a special type of cell is much more prolific in generating a protective sheath covering nerve fibers than previously believed. (2019-07-05)
The Lancet: Nerve transfer surgery restores hand function and elbow extension in 13 young adults with complete paralysis
Nerve transfer surgery has enabled 13 young adults with complete paralysis to regain movement and function in their elbows and hands, according to the largest case series of this technique in people with tetraplegia (paralysis of both the upper and lower limbs), published in The Lancet. (2019-07-04)
Up to 30% of children carry a gene variant that may increase susceptibility to methylmercury
A study with 2,147 children explored the association between prenatal exposure to methylmercury, intellectual coefficient at 8 years of age, and genotype (2019-07-03)
Sense of smell, pollution and neurological disease connection explored
A consensus is building that air pollution can cause neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, but how fine, sooty particles cause problems in the brain is still an unanswered question. (2019-07-01)
Copper compound shows further potential as therapy for slowing ALS
A compound with potential as a treatment for ALS has gained further promise in a new study that showed it improved the condition of mice whose motor neurons had been damaged by an environmental toxin known to cause features of ALS. (2019-07-01)
Kessler researchers explore social cognitive deficits in progressive multiple sclerosis
'This study is an important first step toward a better understanding of cognitive dysfunction in individuals with progressive MS,' said Dr. (2019-06-25)
Predictors of cognitive recovery following mild to severe traumatic brain injury
Researchers have shown that higher intelligence and younger age are predictors of greater cognitive recovery 2-5 years post-mild to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). (2019-06-25)
New therapy promotes vascular repair following stroke
Following a stroke, antibodies that inhibit the signaling molecule Nogo-A can help repair blood vessels in the affected brain regions. (2019-06-24)
One step closer to chronic pain relief
While effective drugs against chronic pain are not just around the corner, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have succeeded in identifying a protein as a future potential target for medicinal drugs. (2019-06-20)
Epilepsy and sudden death linked to bad gene
In sudden death in epilepsy, people stop breathing for no apparent reason and die. (2019-06-20)
Drug boosts growth in youngsters with most common form of dwarfism, new study finds
A drug that helps regulate bone development has boosted growth rates in children with achondroplasia -- the most common type of dwarfism -- in a trial by Melbourne's Murdoch Children's Research Institute. (2019-06-18)
Study shows experimental drug can encourage bone growth in children with dwarfism
Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine, the Murdoch Children's Research Institute in Australia and seven other medical institutions report that an experimental drug called vosoritide, which interferes with certain proteins that block bone growth, allowed the average annual growth rate to increase in a study of 35 children and teenagers with achondroplasia, a form of dwarfism. (2019-06-18)
Introduced a new paradigm of cell transplantation with scaffold microrobots
Professor Hongsoo Choi's team developed a microrobot that can precisely transplant stem cells in various in vivo and vitro environments. (2019-06-17)
Reaching and grasping -- Learning fine motor coordination changes the brain
When we train the reaching for and grasping of objects, we also train our brain. (2019-06-12)
Promising treatment for shoulder pain in wheelchair users with spinal cord injury
A New Jersey team of researchers has reported the first case of successful, long-term relief of chronic refractory shoulder pain in a wheelchair user with spinal cord injury following a single injection of autologous, micro-fragmented adipose tissue. (2019-06-12)
BU researchers develop new metamaterial that can improve MRI quality and reduce scan time
New magnetic metamaterial could be used as an additive technology to increase the imaging power of lower-strength MRI machines, increasing the number of patients seen by clinics and decreasing associated costs, without any of the risks that come with using higher-strength magnetic fields. (2019-06-10)
Scientists edge closer to root causes of multiple sclerosis
An international team of researchers led by the University of British Columbia has made a scientific advance they hope will lead to the development of preventative treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS). (2019-06-06)
Nanotechnology treatment shows promise against multiple sclerosis
A nanotechnology treatment derived from bone marrow stem cells has reversed multiple sclerosis symptoms in mice and could eventually be used to help humans, according to a new study led by University of California, Irvine researchers. (2019-06-05)
Researchers discover cells that change their identity during normal development
The ability of a developed cell to transform into another type of cell is exceptionally rare. (2019-06-04)
Pain free, thanks to evolution
African mole-rats are insensitive to many different kinds of pain. (2019-05-30)
African mole-rats immune to 'wasabi pain'
A new report in Science provides the first evidence of a mammal -- the highveld mole-rat -- being immune to pain from exposure to allyl isothiocyanate, or AITC, the active ingredient of wasabi. (2019-05-30)
Genomics of Isle Royale wolves reveal impacts of inbreeding
A new paper explores the genetic signatures of a pair of wolves isolated on Isle Royale, a remote national park in Lake Superior. (2019-05-29)
Microbes on explanted pedicle screws: Possible cause of spinal implant failure
In this paper, the authors demonstrate a significant association between pedicle screw loosening and the presence of low-virulent pathogens on spinal implants. (2019-05-28)
New evidence supports surgery for rare type of brain lymphoma
Through a systematic review of published studies going back 50 years, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have identified a distinct subtype of primary central nervous system (PCNS) lymphoma that should be considered for surgical removal, suggesting a major shift in how this type of tumor is evaluated and managed. (2019-05-28)
UC Davis study shows temperature alters developing nervous system in frogs
A UC Davis study that compared the effects of cold and warm temperatures on the development of frog eggs into larvae found that environmental temperature significantly changes how the nervous system develops. (2019-05-23)
ALS research reveals new treatment approach
New research on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (AML) has revealed that a protein called membralin plays a key role in the disease process. (2019-05-23)
The neural mechanisms that inhibit slow muscle activity during fast swimming in fish
Using zebrafish larvae, Assistant Professor Yukiko Kimura and Professor Shin-Ichi Higashijima of the National Institute for Basic Biology in Japan have discovered neural mechanisms that suppress slow muscle activity in fish swimming at high speeds. (2019-05-22)
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