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Current Standards News and Events, Standards News Articles.
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More evidence of causal link between air pollution and early death
Strengthening U.S. air quality standards for fine particulate pollution to be in compliance with current World Health Association (WHO) guidelines could save more than 140,000 lives over the course of a decade, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. (2020-06-26)
Study finds strong evidence for a causal link between long-term exposure to fine air particles and greater mortality in elderly Americans
A new analysis of 16 years of publicly accessible health data on 68.5 million Medicare enrollees provides broad evidence that long-term exposure to fine particles in the air - even at levels below current EPA standards - leads to increased mortality rates among the elderly. (2020-06-26)
Old drug standards delay new drug approvals
The more information the FDA has about existing drugs, the longer it takes to OK new ones for the same conditions. (2020-06-19)
NJIT researchers develop easier and faster way to quantify, explore therapeutic proteins
Researchers at New Jersey Institute of Technology in collaboration with Ohio University and Merck & Co. (2020-06-17)
Study finds 82 percent of avocado oil rancid or mixed with other oils
The country's first extensive study of commercial avocado oil quality and purity finds the vast majority of avocado oil sold in the U.S. is of poor quality, mislabeled or adulterated with other oils. (2020-06-17)
Better patient identification could help fight the coronavirus
In a peer-reviewed commentary published in npj Digital Medicine, experts from Regenstrief Institute, Mayo Clinic and The Pew Charitable Trusts write that matching patient records from disparate sources is not only achievable, but fundamental to stem the tide of the current pandemic and allow for fast action for future highly contagious viruses. (2020-06-02)
SCAI issues position statement on the performance of percutaneous coronary intervention in ambulatory surgical centers
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) today issued a position statement on the performance of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs). (2020-05-14)
Crises are no excuse for lowering scientific standards, say ethicists
Ethicists from Carnegie Mellon and McGill universities are calling on the global research community to resist treating the urgency of the current COVID-19 outbreak as grounds for making exceptions to rigorous research standards in pursuit of treatments and vaccines. (2020-04-23)
Avoid making exceptions for research quality during COVID-19 pandemic
Global crises are no excuse for lowering scientific standards, argue Alex London and Jonathan Kimmelman in a Policy Forum. (2020-04-23)
Poor coastal hypoxia and acidification policy leaves marine fisheries at risk
Current regulatory standards regarding the dissolved oxygen and pH levels of coastal waters have not kept pace with the scientific understanding of hypoxia and acidification, nor with the mounting evidence of their negative impact on coastal marine life. (2020-04-23)
Major new study charts course to net zero industrial emissions
A major new study by an interdisciplinary team of researchers finds that it is possible -- and critical -- to bring industrial greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2070. (2020-04-01)
Scientists seek to establish community-driven metadata standards for microbiomes research
As the collective body of microbiome data for diverse crops grows, the lack of consistency in recording data makes it harder for the data to be utilized across research projects. (2020-03-25)
Concerns over 'exaggerated' study claims of AI outperforming doctors
Many studies claiming that artificial intelligence is as good as (or better than) human experts at interpreting medical images are of poor quality and are arguably exaggerated, posing a risk for the safety of 'millions of patients' warn researchers in The BMJ today. (2020-03-25)
Corporate social irresponsibility: Which cases are critically reported -- and which aren't?
A new study on media reports about corporate misconduct in five countries shows that reporting or no reporting often depends on interests of the media companies. (2020-03-12)
Daily exposure to ozone pollution linked to increased risk of death
Daily exposure to ground level ozone in cities worldwide is associated with an increased risk of death, finds the largest study of its kind published by The BMJ today. (2020-02-10)
Measuring the world of social phenomena
Economists working with Professor Marko Sarstedt from University of Magdeburg are demanding that the same scientific standards be applied to economics and the behavioral sciences in general as are used in the natural sciences. (2020-01-20)
Healthier school meals are evidence of the success of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act
In this editorial, concerns used to support the rollbacks of nutrition standards set forth in the 2010 Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act are analyzed, with researchers finding not only that these concerns are not supported by evidence, but also that the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act had notable positive effects on the dietary quality of meals served to school-aged children. (2020-01-14)
CLICS: World's largest database of cross-linguistic lexical associations
A team of scientists, led by scholars from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, has published a new version of the Database of Cross-Linguistic Colexifications (CLICS), covering lexical associations in more than 3,100 languages varieties. (2020-01-13)
NIST study suggests universal method for measuring light power
The proposed definition promises a more precise, less expensive and more portable method for measuring this important quantity for science, technology, manufacturing, commerce and national defense. (2019-12-20)
Counting photons is now routine enough to need standards
NIST has taken a step toward enabling universal standards for single-photon detectors (SPDs), which are becoming increasingly important in science and industry. (2019-12-20)
Concerns over regulation of oral powders or gels sold as medical devices in Europe
Oral powders or gels, sold as medical devices in the European Union (EU), aren't regulated to the same safety standards as those applied to medicines, reveals research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. (2019-12-03)
HIV drug exposure in womb may increase child risk of microcephaly, developmental delays
Children born to women on HIV therapy containing the drug efavirenz were 2 to 2.5 times more likely to have microcephaly, or small head size, compared to children born to women on regimens of other antiretroviral drugs, according to an analysis funded by the National Institutes of Health. (2019-11-18)
China meets ultra-low emissions in advance of the 2020 goal
Scientists from the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science (AMSS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), along with other collaborators, recently revealed that China's coal-fired power plants met ultra-low emission (ULE) standards ahead of schedule and also achieved substantial emission reductions between 2014 and 2017. (2019-11-05)
Public blame accidents on drivers more than their automated cars when both make mistakes
The public are more likely to blame accidents involving semi-autonomous cars on driver -- rather than machine -- error, a new study has found. (2019-10-28)
NYU scholar makes recommendations to end disparities in stem for English learners
In her latest research article, published in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), NYU Professor Okhee Lee provides recommendations to support a federal mandate in the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 which requires that English language proficiency standards align with content standards. (2019-10-08)
China is on track to meet its ultra-low emissions goals for 2020
Polluting emissions from Chinese thermal power plants declined significantly between 2014 and 2017, according to research involving UCL. (2019-10-07)
Updated Barrett's Guideline aims to improve patient outcomes
The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has released its updated 'ASGE guideline on screening and surveillance of Barrett's esophagus,' published in the September issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. (2019-09-05)
Study finds air pollution linked to risk of premature death
A new international study has found that air pollution is linked to increased cardiovascular and respiratory death rates. (2019-08-21)
Relaxing of regulations for regenerative medicines has cascading effect internationally
Countries that relax regulations for regenerative medicines, like stem cell 'treatments', could be causing a downward spiral in international standards. (2019-08-15)
Air pollution cuts are saving lives in New York state
Lower air pollution levels saved an estimated 5,660 lives in New York State in 2012, compared to 2002 levels, according to a new study. (2019-08-07)
Researchers call for industry regulation to stop 'photoshop' frenzy in advertising
In a newly published analysis of legal and regulatory strategies that may help combat rampant 'photoshopping' and the portrayal of unrealistic beauty standards in advertising, researchers from Harvard, Dickinson and Michigan State University College of Law are calling for industry regulation to curtail digital alteration of images in advertising. (2019-07-25)
Attitude towards new educational standards in Russia shows conflicting opinions
'The objective was to find out how ready the teachers are to implement the expected changes. (2019-07-10)
Yale-developed scorecard promotes better clinical trial data sharing
A tool developed by researchers at Yale, Stanford, and Bioethics International can promote greater sharing of clinical trial data by pharmaceutical companies. (2019-07-10)
Are you sure it's burning mouth syndrome?
Not all burning mouths are the result of a medical condition known as 'burning mouth syndrome' (BMS) and physicians and researchers need better standards for an appropriate diagnosis, according to new research at the School of Dental Medicine at Case Western Reserve University. (2019-07-03)
Given more information about how wine is made, consumers less likely to pay for organic
Consumers are more willing to pay for wine that comes with an organic or organic grape label but providing information about certification standards and organic production practices reduces consumer willingness to pay for all wines. (2019-06-26)
New research backs Australian regulatory decision on poppers
Young gay and bisexual men are frequent users of alkyl nitrites, or poppers, but few show signs of addiction, risky consumption habits or other psychosocial problems, a study shows. (2019-06-20)
Not always reaching your potential is okay, but overthinking it is a problem
Having aspirations helps us navigate life in a meaningful and fulfilling way, but it can also cause psychological distress when hopes are left unfulfilled. (2019-06-20)
Many patients with pancreatic cancer miss out on treatment that may extend survival
Despite potential for prolonging survival with treatment, one-third of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer do not see a medical oncologist, and even more do not receive cancer-directed treatment, found new research published in CMAJ. (2019-05-27)
Expert panel calls for increased transparency so consumers can identify quality probiotics
Probiotics are increasingly being researched and marketed as functional ingredients to enhance health. (2019-05-10)
C-Path, CDISC develop therapeutic area standard to foster meaningful research for HIV
The Critical Path Institute (C-Path) and CDISC are pleased to announce the release of a global Therapeutic Area Standard that specifies how to structure commonly collected data and outcome measurements in clinical trials for HIV. (2019-04-16)
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