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Current Statistical analysis News and Events

Current Statistical analysis News and Events, Statistical analysis News Articles.
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Statistical inference to mimic the operating manner of highly-experienced crystallographer
A research team from Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), RIKEN, and the University of Tokyo developed a novel data analysis method for prior evaluation of single crystal structure analysis. (2019-09-17)
A modelling tool to rapidly predict weed spread risk
A new statistical modelling tool will enable land management authorities to predict where invasive weed species are most likely to grow so they can find and eliminate plants before they have time to spread widely. (2019-09-16)
African american bachelor's degrees see growth, behind in physical sciences, engineering
African Americans are seeing growth in engineering and physical sciences but are not progressing at the same rate when compared to the general population. (2019-09-12)
Addressing food insecurity in health care settings
A review of articles covering food insecurity interventions in health care settings from 2000-2018 found that interventions focused on either referrals or direct provision of food or vouchers both suffered from poor follow-up, a general lack of comparison groups, and limited statistical power and generalizability. (2019-09-09)
Revolutionizing water quality monitoring for our rivers and reef
New, lower-cost help may soon be on the way to help manage one of the biggest threats facing the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-09-03)
Corals take control of nitrogen recycling
Corals use sugar from their symbiotic algal partners to control them by recycling nitrogen from their own ammonium waste. (2019-09-03)
Shasta dam releases can be managed to benefit both salmon and sturgeon, study finds
Cold water released from Lake Shasta into the Sacramento River to benefit endangered salmon can be detrimental to young green sturgeon, a threatened species adapted to warmer water. (2019-08-20)
Researchers develop tools to help manage seagrass survival
A new QUT-led study has developed a statistical toolbox to help avoid seagrass loss which provides shelter, food and oxygen to fish and at-risk species like dugongs and green turtles. (2019-08-18)
Arctic could be iceless in September if temps increase 2 degrees
Arctic sea ice could disappear completely through September each summer if average global temperatures increase by as little as 2 degrees, according to a new study by the University of Cincinnati. (2019-08-13)
Cold winters not caused by Arctic climate change
Recent studies into the relationship between decrease in the sea ice in the Arctic and ice-cold winters in moderate latitudes, like the Polar Vortex cold waves in North America, seem to suggest that such a connection does indeed exist. (2019-08-12)
Data analysis tool to help scientists make sense of mouse's calls
Technology that can help interpret inaudible calls from laboratory mice has been developed in a bid to improve research. (2019-08-08)
Study casts doubt on evidence for 'gold standard' psychological treatments
Researchers have found 56% percent of 'Empirically Supported Treatments' per the American Psychological Association fare poorly across most metric scores for power and replicability. (2019-08-01)
Faint foreshocks foretell California quakes
New research mining data from a catalog of more than 1.8 million southern California earthquakes found that nearly three-fourths of the time, foreshocks signalled a quake's readiness to strike from days to weeks before the the mainshock hit, a revelation that could advance earthquake forecasting. (2019-07-31)
Banning tobacco sales to people under age 21 reduces smoking
County- and municipality-level bans on tobacco sales to individuals under age 21 yield substantive reductions in smoking among 18- to 20-year-olds, according to a new study from the Yale School of Public Health. (2019-07-26)
Tending the future of data analysis with MVApp
New app aims to improve the statistical analysis of large datasets in plant science and beyond. (2019-07-16)
Jump test tool to predict athletic performance
Researchers studying the impact of fatigue on athletic performance have developed prototype software that can enable coaches to predict when elite athletes will be too fatigued to perform at their best. (2019-07-10)
Paris Agreement does not rule out ice-free Arctic
IBS research team reveals a considerable chance for an ice-free Arctic Ocean at global warming limits stipulated in the Paris Agreement. (2019-07-09)
University of Pittsburgh group brings computation and experimentation closer together
A bioengineering group from the University of Pittsburgh is bringing the worlds of computational modeling and experimentation closer together by developing a methodology to help analyze the wealth of imaging data provided by advancements in imaging tools and automated microscopes. (2019-07-09)
Study finds psychiatric diagnosis to be 'scientifically meaningless'
A new study, published in Psychiatry Research, has concluded that psychiatric diagnoses are scientifically worthless as tools to identify discrete mental health disorders. (2019-07-08)
Common scents don't always make the best perfumes, suggests mathematical study
Perfumes that use the most popular scents do not always obtain the highest number of ratings, according to an analysis of online perfume reviews. (2019-07-03)
Researchers identify maximum weight children should carry in school backpacks
Scientists from the University of Granada and Liverpool John Moores University (UK) have established that school children who use backpacks should avoid loads of more than 10% of their body weight -- and those who use trolleys, 20% of their body weight. (2019-07-02)
Appearance of deep-sea fish does not signal upcoming earthquake in Japan
The unusual appearance of deep-sea fish like the oarfish or slender ribbonfish in Japanese shallow waters does not mean that an earthquake is about to occur, according to a new statistical analysis. (2019-06-18)
Sexual-orientation study
A new study from Professor Doug VanderLaan's lab in UofT Mississauga's Department of Psychology looking at biological mechanisms that are often thought to influence male sexual orientation was published in the latest edition of PNAS. (2019-06-10)
Decoding Beethoven's music style using data science
What makes Beethoven sound like Beethoven? EPFL researchers have completed a first analysis of Beethoven's writing style, applying statistical techniques to unlock recurring patterns. (2019-06-06)
Heat, not drought, will drive lower crop yields, researchers say
Climate change-induced heat stress will play a larger role than drought stress in reducing the yields of several major US crops later this century, according to Cornell University researchers who weighed in on a high-stakes debate between crop experts and scientists. (2019-06-03)
Research deepens understanding of gut bacteria's connections to human health, disease
Researchers have made an important advance in understanding the roles that gut bacteria play in human health. (2019-05-30)
From viruses to social bots, researchers unearth the structure of attacked networks
Researchers at USC developed a machine learning model of the invisible networks around us including, how viruses interact with proteins and genes in the body. (2019-05-29)
Avalanche Victims: When can rewarming lead to survival?
It is difficult for doctors to accurately assess avalanche victims who arrive at hospital suffering cardiac arrest: has the patient effectively suffocated, or is there a realistic prospect of survival if the patient is properly rewarmed? (2019-05-28)
Factors associated with elephant poaching
Study associates illegal hunting rates in Africa with levels of poverty, corruption and ivory demand. (2019-05-28)
Study: High rates of food insecurity found at Southern Appalachia Colleges
College students in Southern Appalachia are affected by food insecurity at a higher rate than the national average, which can translate into poor academic performance and unhealthy spending habits and coping mechanisms, according to a new study coauthored by researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and published in Current Developments in Nutrition. (2019-05-24)
New studies increase confidence in NASA's measure of Earth's temperature
A new assessment of NASA's record of global temperatures revealed that the agency's estimate of Earth's long-term temperature rise in recent decades is accurate to within less than a tenth of a degree Fahrenheit, providing confidence that past and future research is correctly capturing rising surface temperatures. (2019-05-23)
Galaxies as 'cosmic cauldrons'
Star formation within interstellar clouds of gas and dust, so-called molecular clouds, proceeds very rapidly yet highly 'inefficiently'. (2019-05-22)
More years spent in education associated with lower weight and blood pressure
Scientists have helped unravel the link between higher levels of education and reduced risk of heart attack and stroke. (2019-05-22)
New podcast explores why 'statistically significant' is so misunderstood
It's a controversial topic. Probability values (p-values) have been used as a way to measure the significance of research studies since the 1920s, with thousands of researchers relying on them since. (2019-05-21)
Study identifies our 'inner pickpocket'
Researchers have identified how the human brain is able to determine the properties of a particular object using purely statistical information: a result which suggests there is an 'inner pickpocket' in all of us. (2019-05-21)
Complete removal of tumor reduces risk of recurrence of cancer in dogs
The relative risk of a recurrence of cancer is reduced by 60% in dogs whose tumors are completely removed, a new analysis by Oregon State University researchers has found. (2019-05-14)
New research identifies patterns of tree distribution in African savannas
According to a new study published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, airborne surveys show that, on a large scale, the spatial arrangement of savanna trees follows distinct patterns that can be described mathematically regardless of variation in environmental factors. (2019-05-14)
Statins linked to lower risk of early death in patients with colorectal cancer
Use of statins before or after a diagnosis of colorectal cancer was linked with a lower risk of premature death, both from cancer and from other causes, in a Cancer Medicine analysis of published studies. (2019-05-09)
Statistical study finds it unlikely South African fossil species is ancestral to humans
Research by UChicago paleontologists finds that it is unlikely that a two-million-year-old, apelike fossil from South Africa is a direct ancestor of Homo, the genus to which modern-day humans belong. (2019-05-08)
Social media has limited effects on teenage life satisfaction
A study of 12,000 British teenagers has shown that links between social media use and life satisfaction are bidirectional and small at best, but may differ depending on gender and how the data are analysed. (2019-05-06)
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