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Neuroendocrine markers of grief
Researchers have examined what's currently known about the neuroendocrine effects of grief and whether biological factors can predict complicated or prolonged grief after the death of a loved one. (2020-08-05)
A normal DNA repair process can become a major source of mutations in cancer
The mechanism unveiled triggers a mutation fog, causing hundreds of mutations in each tumor, which spread through the genome of lung, head-and-neck and breast cancers. (2020-08-04)
Mandatory country-wide BCG vaccination found to correlate with slower growth rates of COVID-19 cases
Scientists have found that countries with mandatory Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination until at least the year 2000 tended to exhibit slower infection and death rates during the first 30 days of the outbreak (2020-07-31)
Fracture risk associated with bisphosphonate drug holidays
Bisphosphonates have been shown to reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures. (2020-07-29)
Research could save years of breeding for new Miscanthus hybrids
As climate change becomes increasingly difficult to ignore, scientists are working to diversify and improve alternatives to fossil-fuel-based energy. (2020-07-28)
Study identifies top reasons for sewer line failure
Concrete sewer pipes around the world are most likely to fail either because their concrete is not strong enough or because they can't handle the weight of trucks that drive over them, a new study indicates. (2020-07-27)
Music on the brain
A new study looks at differences between the brains of Japanese classical musicians, Western classical musicians and nonmusicians. (2020-07-20)
Blood iron levels could be key to slowing ageing, gene study shows
Genes linked to ageing that could help explain why some people age at different rates to others have been identified by scientists. (2020-07-16)
Recognising fake images using frequency analysis
They look deceptively real, but they are made by computers: so-called deep-fake images are generated by machine learning algorithms, and humans are pretty much unable to distinguish them from real photos. (2020-07-16)
Composing creativity: Children benefit from new painting materials
New research out of the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) utilizes digital image analysis technology to shed light on some of the challenges children face when representing their imaginations through the medium of paint. (2020-07-16)
AI model to forecast complicated large-scale tropical instability waves in Pacific Ocean
Prof. LI Xiaofeng from the Institute of Oceanology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (IOCAS) and his collaborators from Ministry of Natural Resources and Shanghai Ocean University studied this type of complex oceanic phenomena through artificial intelligence (AI) technologies. (2020-07-15)
No evidence that predator control will save mountain caribou, study says
Addressing potential threats from predators has not slowed the dramatic decline of mountain caribou in British Columbia and Alberta, according to a new study by scientists from the University of Alberta and two other western Canadian universities. (2020-07-14)
A dual antenatal therapy benefits extreme preterm babies better than either alone or none
Researchers, led by Samuel Gentle, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics in the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, report that antenatal treatment with both magnesium sulfate and corticosteroids together yields an increased benefit for children born at 22 to 26 weeks of gestation, compared to no antenatal treatment or with either therapy alone. (2020-07-13)
Collective behavior research reveals secrets of successful football teams
Collective behaviour researchers have applied a new tool for analysing the movement of football players that goes beyond looking at individual athletes to capturing how the team operates as a whole. (2020-07-10)
Multisample technique to analyze cell adhesion
An assay for imaging the physical interactions between multiple cell populations could help cancer research and treatment assessment. (2020-07-06)
Does DNA in the water tell us how many fish are there?
Researchers have developed a new non-invasive method to count individual fish by measuring the concentration of environmental DNA in the water, which could be applied for quantitative monitoring of aquatic ecosystems. (2020-07-03)
Popular chemotherapy drug may be less effective in overweight and obese women
Breast cancer patients who are overweight or obese might benefit less from treatment with docetaxel, a common chemotherapy drug, than lean patients, a new study finds. (2020-07-02)
Coronavirus: Social distancing accepted when people understand exponential growth
Experiments among U.S. population show: When people fail to see the need for restrictions on public life, explaining the exponential increase of infections creates greater acceptance for measures taken to slow down the infection rate. (2020-06-29)
Study finds strong evidence for a causal link between long-term exposure to fine air particles and greater mortality in elderly Americans
A new analysis of 16 years of publicly accessible health data on 68.5 million Medicare enrollees provides broad evidence that long-term exposure to fine particles in the air - even at levels below current EPA standards - leads to increased mortality rates among the elderly. (2020-06-26)
Electricity price more volatile during uncertainty periods in renewable energy regulation
Incorporating renewable energies into the electricity system entails a certain degree of volatility in the electricity price owing to the intermittent nature of generation by plants of this type. (2020-06-25)
Study settles the score on whether the modern world is less violent
A study, by mathematicians at the University of York, has used new techniques to address the long-running debate over whether battle deaths have been declining globally since the end of the Second World War. (2020-06-16)
Statistical analyses of plant metabolites allow solid testing of plant defense theories
High-throughput analyses of small substances in Nicotiana attenuata reveal that plants re-organize their metabolism to produce highly-specific defense metabolites after insect attack. (2020-06-12)
Crop pathogens 'remarkably adaptable'
Pathogens that attack agricultural crops show remarkable adaptability to new climates and new plant hosts, new research shows. (2020-06-11)
An aspirin a day keeps the bowel doctor away
A regular dose of aspirin to reduce the risk of inherited bowel cancer lasts at least 10 years after stopping treatment, research has revealed. (2020-06-11)
AI sentencing tools need to be closely scrutinised, says new study
Judges should closely vet the AI tools they use to help them predict whether a defendant is likely to re offend, urges a new study. (2020-06-09)
A sharper view of flood risk
Extreme weather patterns and regions at risk of flooding could be easier to spot using a new statistical model for large spatial datasets. (2020-06-08)
Environmental noise changes evolutionary cooperation between cellular components, model shows
Cells are massive factories, containing a multitude of substations devoted to specific tasks all devoted to keeping the overarching organism alive. (2020-06-06)
Why we should trust registered clinical trials
In a time when we have to rely on clinical trials for COVID-19 drugs and vaccines, a new study brings good news about the credibility of registered clinical trials. (2020-06-04)
UMN trial shows hydroxychloroquine has no benefit over placebo in preventing COVID-19
Today, University of Minnesota Medical School researchers published the results from the first randomized clinical trial testing hydroxychloroquine for the post-exposure prevention of COVID-19. (2020-06-03)
An analysis of psychological meta-analyses reveals a reproducibility problem
Meta-analysis research studies in psychology aren't always reproducible due to a lack of transparency of reporting in the meta-analysis process, according to a new study published May 27, 2020, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Esther Maassen of Tilburg University, the Netherlands, and colleagues. (2020-05-27)
New research shows that increasing number of lost pregnancies is linked to higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes
New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) shows that the higher the number of pregnancy losses a woman has, the higher her risk of developing type 2 diabetes. (2020-05-20)
Doctors should be cautious when using current warning system for patient's worsening health
The current system for checking on a patient's health and how likely it is to worsen while in hospital is based on weak evidence and using poor scores may harm patients, suggests research published by The BMJ today. (2020-05-20)
New study estimates the odds of life and intelligence emerging beyond our planet
To conduct his analysis, Kipping used the chronology of the earliest evidence for life and the evolution of humanity. (2020-05-18)
Growing mountains or shifting ground: What is going on in Earth's inner core?
Exhaustive seismic data from repeating earthquakes and new data-processing methods have yielded the best evidence yet that the Earth's inner core is rotating - revealing a better understanding of the hotly debated processes that control the planet's magnetic field. (2020-05-12)
Can we estimate the time until the next recession?
As the world economy is falling into one of the biggest contractions of the last decades, a new study of economic recession patterns finds that the likelihood of a downturn was high even before the onset of the Coronavirus crisis. (2020-05-07)
Green tea may help with weight loss efforts
In an analysis published in Phytotherapy Research of randomized controlled trials, individuals who consumed green tea experienced a significant decline in body weight and body mass index. (2020-05-06)
Evaluation of pedestrian walking speed change patterns at crosswalks in palestine
One of the main pedestrian issues considered in facilities and traffic signal design is pedestrian walking speed. (2020-05-05)
What protects minority languages from extinction?
A new study by Jean-Marc Luck from Paris and Anita Mehta from Oxford published in EPJ B, uses mathematical modelling to suggest two mechanisms through which majority and minority languages come to coexist in the same area. (2020-04-22)
Trade friction: Adaptiveness of swarms of complex networks
Network analysis revealed power-law properties of core and peripheral networks. (2020-04-17)
New protocol identifies fascinating quantum states
Topological materials attract great interest and may provide the basis for a new era in materials development. (2020-04-10)
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