Nav: Home

Current Statistical analysis News and Events

Current Statistical analysis News and Events, Statistical analysis News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Hurricanes have become bigger and more destructive for USA; new study from the Niels Bohr Institute
A new study by researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Aslak Grinsted, Peter Ditlevsen and Jens Hesselbjerg shows that hurricanes have become more destructive since 1900, and the worst of them are more than 3 times as frequent now than 100 years ago. (2019-11-11)
Post-market price changes alone account for most recent spending growth for biologics
New research findings presented at the 2019 ACR/ARP Annual Meeting found that annual spending on biologic DMARDS (biologics) by US public programs and beneficiaries nearly doubled from 2012 to 2016. (2019-11-09)
Skull features among Asian and Asian-derived groups differ significantly
Forensic anthropologists have now discovered that several skull features in Asian and Asian-derived groups differ significantly with regard to shape, such that they can be distinguished using statistical analyses. (2019-11-07)
Study calculates links between prescription medications and risk for suicide
A review of 922 prescription medications taken by almost 150 million people over an 11-year period shows that just 10 of these drugs were associated with an increased rate of suicide attempts. (2019-11-05)
In classical and quantum secure communication practical randomness is incomplete
Random bit sequences are key ingredients of various tasks in modern life and especially in secure communication. (2019-11-04)
Intensified global monsoon extreme rainfall signals global warming -- A study
A new study reveals significant associations between global warming and the observed intensification of extreme rainfall over the global monsoon region and its several subregions, including the southern part of South Africa, India, North America and the eastern part of the South America. (2019-10-30)
Research on large storm waves could help lessen their impact on coasts
An international team of researchers has analyzed months of data of large nearshore waves to provide new insights that could help improve the designs of a variety of coastal structures from seaports to seawalls to better withstand destructive waves. (2019-10-29)
Vitamin D deficiency is associated with poor muscle function in adults aged 60+
New research from Trinity College Dublin shows that vitamin D deficiency is an important determinant of poor skeletal muscle function in adults aged 60 years and over. (2019-10-23)
A climate model developed by ISGlobal provides long-term predictions of 'El Niño' events
For the first time, a tool can predict episodes up to two-and-a-half years in advance. (2019-10-21)
Information theory as a forensics tool for investigating climate mysteries
During Earth's last glacial period, temperatures on the planet periodically spiked dramatically and rapidly. (2019-10-16)
On the causes of regional haze
In recent years, the rampant haze in some cities and regions has attracted great attention, and people usually pay attention to the microscopic mechanism of its chemical process. (2019-10-15)
Combination of techniques could improve security for IoT devices
A multi-pronged data analysis approach that can strengthen the security of Internet of Things (IoT) devices -- such as smart TVs, home video cameras and baby monitors -- against current risks and threats has been created by a team of Penn State World Campus students. (2019-10-10)
New imaging platform examines mechanisms behind coral bleaching
The non-invasive approach developed by Professors Vadim Backman and Luisa Marcelino could help marine biologists monitor coral health in the face of climate change. (2019-10-02)
Grouping 'smart cities' into types may help aspiring city planners find a path
A comparative analysis of 'smart cities' worldwide reveals four distinct types, according to an international team of researchers. (2019-10-02)
Expanding the scale of dangerous weather prediction
A more accurate and efficient method of capturing the local factors that lead to extreme rainfall enables better flood prediction across larger regions. (2019-09-29)
Artificial intelligence probes dark matter in the universe
A team of physicists and computer scientists at ETH Zurich has developed a new approach to the problem of dark matter and dark energy in the universe. (2019-09-18)
Statistical inference to mimic the operating manner of highly-experienced crystallographer
A research team from Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), RIKEN, and the University of Tokyo developed a novel data analysis method for prior evaluation of single crystal structure analysis. (2019-09-17)
A modelling tool to rapidly predict weed spread risk
A new statistical modelling tool will enable land management authorities to predict where invasive weed species are most likely to grow so they can find and eliminate plants before they have time to spread widely. (2019-09-16)
African american bachelor's degrees see growth, behind in physical sciences, engineering
African Americans are seeing growth in engineering and physical sciences but are not progressing at the same rate when compared to the general population. (2019-09-12)
Addressing food insecurity in health care settings
A review of articles covering food insecurity interventions in health care settings from 2000-2018 found that interventions focused on either referrals or direct provision of food or vouchers both suffered from poor follow-up, a general lack of comparison groups, and limited statistical power and generalizability. (2019-09-09)
Revolutionizing water quality monitoring for our rivers and reef
New, lower-cost help may soon be on the way to help manage one of the biggest threats facing the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-09-03)
Corals take control of nitrogen recycling
Corals use sugar from their symbiotic algal partners to control them by recycling nitrogen from their own ammonium waste. (2019-09-03)
Shasta dam releases can be managed to benefit both salmon and sturgeon, study finds
Cold water released from Lake Shasta into the Sacramento River to benefit endangered salmon can be detrimental to young green sturgeon, a threatened species adapted to warmer water. (2019-08-20)
Researchers develop tools to help manage seagrass survival
A new QUT-led study has developed a statistical toolbox to help avoid seagrass loss which provides shelter, food and oxygen to fish and at-risk species like dugongs and green turtles. (2019-08-18)
Arctic could be iceless in September if temps increase 2 degrees
Arctic sea ice could disappear completely through September each summer if average global temperatures increase by as little as 2 degrees, according to a new study by the University of Cincinnati. (2019-08-13)
Cold winters not caused by Arctic climate change
Recent studies into the relationship between decrease in the sea ice in the Arctic and ice-cold winters in moderate latitudes, like the Polar Vortex cold waves in North America, seem to suggest that such a connection does indeed exist. (2019-08-12)
Data analysis tool to help scientists make sense of mouse's calls
Technology that can help interpret inaudible calls from laboratory mice has been developed in a bid to improve research. (2019-08-08)
Study casts doubt on evidence for 'gold standard' psychological treatments
Researchers have found 56% percent of 'Empirically Supported Treatments' per the American Psychological Association fare poorly across most metric scores for power and replicability. (2019-08-01)
Faint foreshocks foretell California quakes
New research mining data from a catalog of more than 1.8 million southern California earthquakes found that nearly three-fourths of the time, foreshocks signalled a quake's readiness to strike from days to weeks before the the mainshock hit, a revelation that could advance earthquake forecasting. (2019-07-31)
Banning tobacco sales to people under age 21 reduces smoking
County- and municipality-level bans on tobacco sales to individuals under age 21 yield substantive reductions in smoking among 18- to 20-year-olds, according to a new study from the Yale School of Public Health. (2019-07-26)
Tending the future of data analysis with MVApp
New app aims to improve the statistical analysis of large datasets in plant science and beyond. (2019-07-16)
Jump test tool to predict athletic performance
Researchers studying the impact of fatigue on athletic performance have developed prototype software that can enable coaches to predict when elite athletes will be too fatigued to perform at their best. (2019-07-10)
Paris Agreement does not rule out ice-free Arctic
IBS research team reveals a considerable chance for an ice-free Arctic Ocean at global warming limits stipulated in the Paris Agreement. (2019-07-09)
University of Pittsburgh group brings computation and experimentation closer together
A bioengineering group from the University of Pittsburgh is bringing the worlds of computational modeling and experimentation closer together by developing a methodology to help analyze the wealth of imaging data provided by advancements in imaging tools and automated microscopes. (2019-07-09)
Study finds psychiatric diagnosis to be 'scientifically meaningless'
A new study, published in Psychiatry Research, has concluded that psychiatric diagnoses are scientifically worthless as tools to identify discrete mental health disorders. (2019-07-08)
Common scents don't always make the best perfumes, suggests mathematical study
Perfumes that use the most popular scents do not always obtain the highest number of ratings, according to an analysis of online perfume reviews. (2019-07-03)
Researchers identify maximum weight children should carry in school backpacks
Scientists from the University of Granada and Liverpool John Moores University (UK) have established that school children who use backpacks should avoid loads of more than 10% of their body weight -- and those who use trolleys, 20% of their body weight. (2019-07-02)
Appearance of deep-sea fish does not signal upcoming earthquake in Japan
The unusual appearance of deep-sea fish like the oarfish or slender ribbonfish in Japanese shallow waters does not mean that an earthquake is about to occur, according to a new statistical analysis. (2019-06-18)
Sexual-orientation study
A new study from Professor Doug VanderLaan's lab in UofT Mississauga's Department of Psychology looking at biological mechanisms that are often thought to influence male sexual orientation was published in the latest edition of PNAS. (2019-06-10)
Decoding Beethoven's music style using data science
What makes Beethoven sound like Beethoven? EPFL researchers have completed a first analysis of Beethoven's writing style, applying statistical techniques to unlock recurring patterns. (2019-06-06)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#540 Specialize? Or Generalize?
Ever been called a "jack of all trades, master of none"? The world loves to elevate specialists, people who drill deep into a single topic. Those people are great. But there's a place for generalists too, argues David Epstein. Jacks of all trades are often more successful than specialists. And he's got science to back it up. We talk with Epstein about his latest book, "Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.