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Current Stem cell research News and Events

Current Stem cell research News and Events, Stem cell research News Articles.
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Study finds fatty acid that kills cancer cells
Researchers have demonstrated that a fatty acid called dihomogamma-linolenic acid, or DGLA, can induce ferroptosis, an iron-dependent type of cell death, in an animal model and in human cancer cells. (2020-07-10)
Fat cell hormone boosts potential of stem cell therapy
Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy has shown promising results in the treatment of conditions ranging from liver cirrhosis to retinal damage, but results can be variable. (2020-07-10)
Cycad stem cuttings need wound sealants for successful propagation
The need to cover an open wound on cycad stem cuttings has been confirmed by the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam in a study published in the Tropical Conservation Science journal on April 27. (2020-07-09)
Deconstructing glioblastoma complexity reveals its pattern of development
Brain cancers have long been thought of as being resistant to treatments because of the presence of multiple types of cancer cells within each tumor. (2020-07-08)
Adipose-derived stem cells considerably improve fat graft retention in breast augmentation
Results of a clinical trial released in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine indicates that breast augmentation in patients treated with fat grafts enriched with autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) had significantly superior results compared to those treated with non-enriched grafts. (2020-07-08)
New clues from fruit flies about the critical role of sex hormones in stem cell control
In one of the first studies addressing the role of sex hormones' impact on stem cells in the gut, scientists outline new insights showing how a steroidal sex hormone, ecdysone, drastically alters the way intestinal stem cells behave, ultimately affecting the overarching structure and function of this critical organ. (2020-07-08)
Machine learning helps grow artificial organs
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Ivannikov Institute for System Programming, and the Harvard Medical School-affiliated Schepens Eye Research Institute have developed a neural network capable of recognizing retinal tissues during the process of their differentiation in a dish. (2020-07-07)
TARA biosystems demonstrates in vitro cardiac biology model mimics human drug response
TARA Biosystems today reported study results demonstrating the ability of TARA's in vitro human cardiac models to reproduce drug responses similar to those observed in humans. (2020-07-07)
RNA key in helping stem cells know what to become
If every cell has the same genetic blueprint, why does an eye cell look and act so differently than a brain cell or skin cell? (2020-07-07)
Epigenetics: What the embryo can teach us about cell reprogramming
Cell reprogramming provides an outstanding opportunity for the artificial generation of stem cells for regenerative medicine approaches in the clinic. (2020-07-06)
Order from noise: How randomness and collective dynamics define a stem cell
Without stem cells, human life would not exist. Due to them, a lump of cells becomes an organ, and a fertilized egg develops into a baby. (2020-07-06)
Multisample technique to analyze cell adhesion
An assay for imaging the physical interactions between multiple cell populations could help cancer research and treatment assessment. (2020-07-06)
Getting a grasp on India's malaria burden
A new approach could illuminate a critical stage in the life cycle of one of the most common malaria parasites. (2020-07-03)
How the body regulates scar tissue growth after heart attacks
New UCLA research conducted in mice could explain why some people suffer more extensive scarring than others after a heart attack. (2020-07-03)
CNIO team develop a technology to improve effectiveness of stem cells in regenerative medicine
Stem cells have been holding great promise for regenerative medicine for years. (2020-07-02)
New platform gauges effects of plastic nanoparticles on human development and health
A study released today in STEM CELLS outlines a new platform researchers designed that allowed them to investigate the potentially harmful effects of microplastics and nanoplastics. (2020-07-02)
Largest source of AATD stem cells collected
Researchers from the Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) at Boston University and Boston Medical Center (BMC) have assembled the largest repository of patient derived stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). (2020-07-02)
Gender gaps in STEM college majors emerge in high school
Although studies have shown that women are more likely than men to enter and complete college in U.S. higher education, women are less likely to earn degrees in science, technology, engineering and math fields. (2020-07-02)
A simpler way to make sensory hearing cells
Scientists from the USC Stem Cell laboratories of Neil Segil and Justin Ichida are whispering the secrets of a simpler way to generate the sensory cells of the inner ear. (2020-07-01)
Long-term culture of human pancreatic slices reveals regeneration of beta cells
Scientists from the Diabetes Research Institute (DRI) at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have developed a method allowing for the long-term culture of 'pancreatic slices' to study the regeneration of the human pancreas in real time. (2020-07-01)
Loss of intestinal goblet cells causes fatal disease after stem cell transplantation
Allogeneic stem cell transplantation can cause a loss of protective goblet cells from the colon's inner lining, which can be fatal. (2020-07-01)
Discovery of key protein behind cancer relapse and progression can lead to new therapies
Reports show that cancer is the second-highest leading cause of death globally. (2020-06-30)
Kessler survey shows education paves the way to employment for youth with disabilities
The 2020 survey collected a wealth of information, including details of college majors and occupations, finding that students with disabilities were more likely to pursue career paths focused on helping people, and less likely to choose STEM majors, or to work in STEM disciplines. (2020-06-30)
COVID-19: Study shows virus can infect heart cells in lab dish
A new study shows that SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 (coronavirus), can infect heart cells in a lab dish, indicating it may be possible for heart cells in COVID-19 patients to be directly infected by the virus. (2020-06-30)
How stress affects bone marrow
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) identified the protein CD86 as a novel marker of infection- and inflammation-induced hematopoietic responses. (2020-06-30)
Even when women outnumber men, gender bias persists among science undergrads
Increasing gender diversity has been a long-sought goal across many of the sciences, and interventions and programs to attract more women into fields like physics and math often happen at the undergraduate level. (2020-06-29)
New research paves way for developing therapies that could slow down Alzheimer's
Neuroscientists and stem cell researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a research model that allows studying human hippocampal neurons, the brain cells primarily affected by Alzheimer's disease pathology. (2020-06-28)
Pulse pressure: A game changer in the fight against dementia
Researchers unravel a pulse-pressure-induced pathway of dementia providing a new understanding on the pathogenesis of dementia. (2020-06-24)
Blood cell mutations linked to leukemias are inevitable as we age
A new study by researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Science in Japan reports differences in blood cell mutations between Japanese and European populations. (2020-06-24)
Study suggests universal flu vaccine may be more challenging than expected
Some common strains of influenza have the potential to mutate to evade broad-acting antibodies that could be elicited by a universal flu vaccine, according to a study led by scientists at Scripps Research. (2020-06-23)
Direct reprogramming: Defying the contemporary limitations in cardiac regeneration
Repair and regeneration of myocardium are the best possible therapy for the end-stage heart failure patients because the current therapies that can help restore the lost cardiomyocytes are limited to heart transplantation only. (2020-06-22)
Study finds new mentoring model supports underrepresented minority women faculty in STEM
Results of a new experiment by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst suggest that an online mutual-mentoring model called 'Amplifying Voices' can create 'trusting and supportive environments' among underrepresented minority women in STEM across academic institutions. (2020-06-22)
A novel radioisotope therapy for children with neuroblastoma
Researchers from Kanazawa University retrospectively analyzed children with refractory or relapsed high-risk neuroblastoma who were treated with high-dose 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine at Kanazawa University Hospital. (2020-06-19)
Early clinical trial supports tumor cell-based vaccine for mantle cell lymphoma
A phase I/II clinical trial by researchers at Stanford University suggests that vaccines prepared from a patient's own tumor cells may prevent the incurable blood cancer mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) from returning after treatment. (2020-06-19)
Study sheds light on why retinal ganglion cells are vulnerable to glaucoma
Millions of sufferers of glaucoma might someday benefit from a study released in STEM CELLS in which a ''disease in a dish'' stem cell model was used to examine the mechanism in glaucoma that causes retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to degenerate, resulting in loss of vision. (2020-06-18)
Studying the Neandertal DNA found in modern humans using stem cells and organoids
Protocols that allow the transformation of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines into organoids have changed the way scientists can study developmental processes and enable them to decipher the interplay between genes and tissue formation, particularly for organs where primary tissue is not available. (2020-06-18)
Yale scientists solve a thorny problem
''Why do plants have thorns?'' is an easy question: The thorns help protect against hungry animals that like to munch on the plants. (2020-06-18)
Neandertal genes in the petri dish
Protocols that allow the transformation of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines into organoids have changed the way scientists can study developmental processes and enable them to decipher the interplay between genes and tissue formation, particularly for organs where primary tissue is not available. (2020-06-18)
Nanoparticle for overcoming leukemia treatment resistance
One of the largest problems with cancer treatment is the development of resistance to anticancer therapies. (2020-06-18)
Addressing the persistent gender gaps in some STEM pursuits
In a Policy Forum, Joseph Cimpian and colleagues identify blind spots in current educational policy designed to remedy gender inequity in STEM and argue that interventions may need to become more nuanced concerning student achievement. (2020-06-18)
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