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Current Stem cells News and Events

Current Stem cells News and Events, Stem cells News Articles.
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Rare genetic change provides clues to pancreas development
Researchers have discovered a key clue into the development of the pancreas and brain by studying rare patients born without a pancreas. (2019-04-18)
Growing a cerebral tract in a microscale brain model
An international research team led by The University of Tokyo modeled the growth of cerebral tracts. (2019-04-18)
Estimating the efficacy and cost of curative gene therapy for beta-thalassemia
Gene therapy offers the promise of a cure for beta-thalassemia and a new study has shown that it is associated with fewer complications and hospital admissions over 2 years than treatment by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). (2019-04-18)
New method to detect off-target effects of CRISPR
Since the CRISPR genome editing technology was invented in 2012, it has shown great promise to treat a number of intractable diseases. (2019-04-18)
Boosting muscle stem cells to treat muscular dystrophy and aging muscles
Scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys have uncovered a molecular signaling pathway involving Stat3 and Fam3a proteins that regulates how muscle stem cells decide whether to self-renew or differentiate -- an insight that could lead to muscle-boosting therapeutics for muscular dystrophies or age-related muscle decline. (2019-04-17)
A light-activated remote control for cells
What if doctors had a remote control that they could use to steer a patient's own cells to a wound to speed up the healing process? (2019-04-17)
Study reveals factors behind embryonic stem cell state
An international collaboration has found for the first time that two new epigenetic regulators, TAF5L and TAF6L, maintain self-renewal of embryonic stem cells. (2019-04-17)
New study explains how inflammation causes gastric cancer
Researchers from Kanazawa University and the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development have solved the decades-old mystery of how stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori causes gastric cancer. (2019-04-16)
Scientists 'reverse engineer' brain cancer cells to find new targets for treatment
Glioblastoma is one of the most devastating forms of cancer, with few existing treatment options. (2019-04-16)
Scientists report new approach to reduce or prevent renal fibrosis
Renal fibrosis, the abnormal accumulation of fibrotic material within the kidney, hinders kidney function and may lead to eventual renal failure. (2019-04-16)
Want black women students to stay in STEM? Help them find role models who look like them
Representation matters for Black women college students when it comes to belonging in rigorous science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs, according to a new study. (2019-04-16)
What happens in the bodies of ALS patients?
Lara Marrone and Jared Sterneckert from the Centre for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at Technische Universität Dresden (TUD), together with collaborating scientists from Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, and the USA, have now discovered that interactions between RNA-binding proteins are more critical to ALS pathogenesis than previously thought. (2019-04-15)
RNA transport in neurons -- Staufen2 detects its target transcripts in a complex manner
A team of scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University of Ulm has discovered that the neuronal transport factor Staufen2 scans and binds to its target transcripts in a much more complex manner than previously thought. (2019-04-15)
'Fingerprint database' could help scientists to identify new cancer culprits
Scientists in Cambridge and London have developed a catalogue of DNA mutation 'fingerprints' that could help doctors pinpoint the environmental culprit responsible for a patient's tumour - including showing some of the fingerprints left in lung tumours by specific chemicals found in tobacco smoke. (2019-04-15)
Tel Aviv University scientists print first 3D heart using patient's biological materials
In a major medical breakthrough, Tel Aviv University researchers have 'printed' the world's first 3D vascularised engineered heart using a patient's own cells and biological materials. (2019-04-15)
To protect stem cells, plants have diverse genetic backup plans
When it comes to stem cell management, all flowering plants work to maintain the same status quo. (2019-04-15)
Rutgers researchers discover crucial link between brain and gut stem cells
Researchers at Rutgers University have identified a new factor that is essential for maintaining the stem cells in the brain and gut and whose loss may contribute to anxiety and cognitive disorders and to gastrointestinal diseases. (2019-04-15)
Stem Cell trial for osteoarthritis patients reduces pain, improves quality of life
In the first North American stem cell clinical trial for osteoarthritis of the knee patients, 12 patients were given injections of their own stem cells and followed for 12 months. (2019-04-12)
Shutting down deadly pediatric brain cancer at its earliest moments
Cell-by-cell genetic analyses of developing brain tissues in neonatal mice and laboratory models of brain cancer allowed scientists to discover a molecular driver of the highly aggressive, deadly, and treatment-resistant brain cancer, glioblastoma. (2019-04-11)
Discovery of 'kingpin' stem cell may help in the understanding of cancerous tumors
Bhatia's team spent more than six years delving down to the cellular level to examine what they say are previously overlooked cells that form on the edges of pluripotent stem cell colonies. (2019-04-11)
Cancer: Central role of cell 'skeleton' discovered
All cells possess a cytoskeleton which allows them to move and maintain their shape. (2019-04-10)
Human iPSC-derived MSCs from aged individuals acquire a rejuvenation signature
The use of primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is fraught with ageing-related shortfalls such as limited expansion and early senescence. (2019-04-10)
Single cell transcriptomics: A new sequencing approach
Researchers from University of Southern Denmark, Wellcome Sanger Institute and BGI, today published a study in the journal Genome Biology comparing the library preparation and sequencing platforms for single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq). (2019-04-09)
Gene editing for recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa
A group of researchers from the Biomedical Research Networking Centre on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), the Research Center for Energy, Environmental and Technology (CIEMAT), and the Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Fundación Jiménez Díaz (IIS-FJD) have led a study which demonstrates the viability of a gene editing strategy for recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (also known as butterfly chilidren) with the tool CRISPR/Cas9 in preclinical models with this disease. (2019-04-08)
New DNA 'shredder' technique goes beyond CRISPR's scissors
An international team has unveiled a new CRISPR-based tool that acts more like a shredder than the usual scissor-like action of CRISPR-Cas9. (2019-04-08)
Spying on cells eating habits could aid cancer diagnosis
Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have developed a new imaging technology to visualize what cells eat, which could aid the diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as cancer. (2019-04-07)
Mutation stands in the way of healthy blood cell maturation
In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen and EMBL in Heidelberg have learned how a specific genetic mutation affects the maturation of blood cells in mouse models. (2019-04-05)
Plants grow less in hotter temperatures
Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report how two transcription factors, ANAC044 and ANAC085, pause the cell cycle when cells experience stress. (2019-04-04)
Researchers find new genetic information behind urogenital track anomalies
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have developed a new mouse model of congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract and disease progression. (2019-04-04)
Genome-wide analysis reveals new strategies to target pancreatic cancer
An international team of scientists led by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine employed an array of next-generation sequencing and gene-editing tools, such as CRISPR, to map the molecular dependencies - and thus vulnerabilities -- of pancreatic cancer stem cells. (2019-04-04)
Parkinson's clues seen in tiny fish could aid quest for treatments
Parkinson's patients could be helped by fresh insights gained from studies of tiny tropical fish. (2019-04-04)
Microglia, cells thought restricted to central nervous system, are redefined in new study
Scientists at the University of Notre Dame discovered microglia actually squeeze through the spinal boundary, crossing into the peripheral nervous system in response to injury. (2019-04-04)
A soft spot for stem cells helps cornea healing
New research led by scientists at Newcastle University reveals a potential revolutionary way to treat eye injuries and prevent blindness -- by softening the tissue hosting the stem cells which then helps repair wounds, inside the body. (2019-04-03)
Researchers discover why men are more likely to develop liver cancer
Researchers in Spain have discovered that a hormone secreted by fat cells that is present at higher levels in women can stop liver cells from becoming cancerous. (2019-04-03)
A step toward recovering reproduction in girls who survive childhood cancer
Leukemia treatments often leave girls infertile, but a procedure developed by researchers at the University of Michigan working with mice is a step toward restoring their ability to be biological mothers. (2019-04-03)
New machine learning model describes dynamics of cell development
From their birth through to their death, cells lead an eventful existence. (2019-04-02)
Tumor microenvironment analyzed to increase effectiveness of preclinical trials
It was shown that co-culturing HeLa adenocarcinoma cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mesenchymal stromal cells results in changes in the proliferative activity of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells and mesenchymal stromal cell populations. (2019-04-02)
Transplanted bone marrow endothelial progenitor cells delay ALS disease progression
Transplanting human bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells into mice mimicking symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) helped more motor neurons survive and slowed disease progression by repairing damage to the blood-spinal cord barrier, University of South Florida researchers report. (2019-04-02)
Researchers discover how tumor-killing immune cells attack lymphomas in living mice
In a study that will be published April 1 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, researchers from the Institut Pasteur and INSERM reveal that chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells can induce tumor regression by directly targeting and killing cancer cells, uncovering new details of how these immune cells work and how their effectiveness could be improved in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and other B cell cancers. (2019-04-01)
Natural gene therapy for intractable skin disease discovered
Pathogenic gene mutations causing a type of intractable skin disease can be eliminated from some parts of patients' skin as they age, according to Hokkaido University researchers and their collaborators in Japan. (2019-04-01)
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