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Texas A&M expert: New clues revealed about Clovis people
There is much debate surrounding the age of the Clovis -- a prehistoric culture named for stone tools found near Clovis, New Mexico in the early 1930s -- who once occupied North America during the end of the last Ice Age. (2020-10-23)
Researchers develop a simplified method to modify disease signaling with light
Cellular optogenetics is a technique that allows researchers to use light to precisely control cell signaling and function in space and time enabling the investigation of mechanisms involved in disease processes. (2020-10-22)
Turbulent era sparked leap in human behavior, adaptability 320,000 years ago
The first analysis of a sedimentary drill core representing 1 million years of environmental history in the East African Rift Valley shows that at the same time early humans were abandoning old tools in favor of more sophisticated technology and broadening their trade, their landscape was experiencing frequent fluctuations in vegetation and water supply that made resources less reliably available. (2020-10-21)
Tocilizumab doesn't ease symptoms or prevent death in moderately ill COVID-19 inpatients
The drug tocilizumab (Actemra) does not reduce the need for breathing assistance with mechanical ventilation or prevent death in moderately ill hospitalized patients with COVID-19, according to a study by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital. (2020-10-21)
Tradition of petrified birds in the Dome of the Rock
The legend of Solomon and the birds associated with the Dome of the Rock was developed over time. (2020-10-20)
Climate change likely drove early human species to extinction, modeling study suggests
Of the six or more different species of early humans, all belonging to the genus Homo, only we Homo sapiens have managed to survive. (2020-10-15)
Results from PROSPECT ABSORB reported at TCT Connect and published simultaneously in JACC
New data from PROSPECT ABSORB, a pilot randomized trial of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of non-flow-limiting vulnerable plaques in native coronary arteries, found that PCI was safe, substantially enlarged follow-up lumen areas, and was associated with favorable long-term clinical outcomes. (2020-10-14)
Results of an individual patient data pooled analysis reported at RCT Connect
An individual patient data pooled analysis comparing the use of bivalirudin versus heparin in heart attack patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) found that bivalirudin use was associated with similar overall rates of 30-day mortality across all heart attack patients, but lower rates of serious bleeding events. (2020-10-14)
6,500-year-old copper workshop uncovered in the Negev Desert's Beer Sheva
A new study indicates that a workshop for smelting copper ore once operated in the Neveh Noy neighborhood of Beer Sheva, the capital of the Negev Desert. (2020-10-05)
Conversation quickly spreads droplets inside buildings
With implications for the transmission of diseases like COVID-19, researchers have found that ordinary conversation creates a conical 'jet-like' airflow that quickly carries a spray of tiny droplets from a speaker's mouth across meters of an interior space. (2020-09-29)
How everyday speech could transmit viral droplets
High-speed imaging of an individual producing common speech sounds shows that the sudden burst of airflow produced from the articulation of consonants like /p/ or /b/ carry salivary and mucus droplets for at least a meter in front of a speaker. (2020-09-29)
New funerary and ritual behaviors of the Neolithic Iberian populations discovered
This finding opens new lines of research and anthropological scenarios, where human and animal sacrifice may have been related to ancestral cults, propitiatory rituals and divine prayers in commemorative festivities (2020-09-25)
How to get a handle on carbon dioxide uptake by plants
How much carbon dioxide, a pivotal greenhouse gas behind global warming, is absorbed by plants on land? (2020-09-21)
Study reveals impact of centuries of human activity in American tropics
The devastating effects of human activity on wildlife in the American tropics over the last 500 years are revealed in a new study published today. (2020-09-15)
Did our early ancestors boil their food in hot springs?
Scientists have found evidence of hot springs near sites where ancient hominids settled, long before the control of fire. (2020-09-15)
Ancient earthquake may have caused destruction of Canaanite palace at Tel Kabri
A team of Israeli and American researchers has uncovered new evidence that an earthquake may have caused the destruction and abandonment of a flourishing Canaanite palatial site about 3,700 years ago. (2020-09-11)
Lecturer takes laptops and smart phones away and musters student presence
Danish university lecturer experiments with banning screens in discussion lessons. (2020-09-09)
The oldest Neanderthal DNA of Central-Eastern Europe
A new study reports the oldest mitochondrial genome of a Neanderthal from Central-Eastern Europe. (2020-09-08)
How do stone forests get their spikes? New research offers pointed answer
A team of scientists has now shed new light on how stone forests and other natural structures are created. (2020-09-07)
How Neanderthals adjusted to climate change
Climate change occurring shortly before their disappearance triggered a complex change in the behaviour of late Neanderthals in Europe: they developed more complex tools. (2020-08-28)
Researchers develop a yeast-based platform to boost production of rare natural molecules
Researchers at Concordia University in Montreal and in Berkeley, California outline a method to synthesize complex bioactive molecules much more quickly and efficiently. (2020-08-27)
Round nanoparticles improve quality factors of surface lattice resonances: Study
A research group led by Dr. LI Guangyuan from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has found that nanohemisphere arrays can significantly improve the quality factors of surface lattice resonances. (2020-08-27)
New neural network differentiates Middle and Late Stone Age toolkits
The change from Middle Stone Age (MSA) to Later Stone Age (LSA) marks a major cultural change amongst our hunter-gatherer ancestors, but distinguishing between these two industrial complexes is not straightforward. (2020-08-26)
Vast stone monuments constructed in Arabia 7,000 years ago
In a new study published in The Holocene, researchers from the Max Planck Society in Jena together with Saudi and international collaborators, present the first detailed study of 'mustatil' stone structures in the Arabian Desert. (2020-08-25)
Ancient mammoth ivory carving technology reconstructed by archeologists
A team of archeologists from Siberian Federal University and Novosibirsk State University provided a detailed reconstruction of a technology that was used to carve ornaments and sculptures from mammoth ivory. (2020-08-24)
Termite-fishing chimpanzees provide clues to the evolution of technology
Unlike chimpanzees in East and West Africa, who use a single tool to extract termites, chimpanzees in Central Africa's Congo Basin use tool sets--puncturing sticks or perforating twigs plus fishing probes--to harvest the insects from underground nests or towering earthen mounds scattered across lowland forests. (2020-08-19)
Australian Indigenous banana cultivation found to go back over 2,000 years
Archaeologists at The Australian National University have found the earliest evidence of Indigenous communities cultivating bananas in Australia. (2020-08-11)
Successful school instruction is digital - but not exclusively
Secondary school students perform better in natural sciences and mathematics and are more motivated when digital tools are used in instruction. (2020-08-10)
Experts urge evaluation of diet at routine check-ups
Unhealthy dietary patterns are a leading cause of heart disease and stroke as well as other chronic diseases. (2020-08-07)
Native American stone tool technology found in Arabia
Stone fluted points dating back some 8,000 to 7,000 years ago, were discovered on archaeological sites in Manayzah, Yemen and Ad-Dahariz, Oman. (2020-08-05)
AI & single-cell genomics
The study of cellular dynamics is crucial to understand how cells develop and how diseases progress. (2020-08-03)
Most of Stonehenge's large boulders share origin in west woods, Wiltshire
Most of the hulking sandstone boulders -- called sarsens - that make up the United Kingdom's famous Stonehenge monument appear to share a common origin 25 kilometers away in West Woods, Wiltshire, according to an analysis of the stones' chemical composition. (2020-07-29)
New study explains 'miracle' of how the Warsaw Ghetto beat Typhus
Through state-of-the-art mathematical modelling and historical documents, a new study points to community health programs and social distancing practices as the most likely explanations for the epidemic's sudden and mysterious collapse, which was hailed by survivors at the time as a miracle. (2020-07-24)
Junk DNA might be really, really useful for biocomputing
When you don't understand how things work, it's not unusual to think of them as just plain old junk. (2020-07-22)
Earliest humans stayed at the Americas 'oldest hotel' in Mexican cave
A cave in a remote part of Mexico was visited by humans around 30,000 years ago - 15,000 years earlier than people were previously thought to have reached the Americas. (2020-07-22)
Stone tools move back the arrival of humans in America thousands of years
Findings of stone tools move back the first immigration of humans to America at least 15,000 years. (2020-07-22)
Geoscientists glean data suggesting global climate changes increase river erosion rates
Using cosmogenic nuclide burial dating methods and optically stimulated luminescence dating, geoscientists establish ages for river deposits from the Yukon River basin that span key time periods of global climate change. (2020-07-20)
Cyber expert on 'insider threat' attacks
Dr Duncan Hodges, Senior Lecturer in Cyberspace Operations, Cranfield University, is actively researching insider threats such as the recent Twitter attack. (2020-07-20)
New weapons for fighting Devil disease
Researchers at the University of Tasmania's Menzies Institute for Medical Research and the School of Medicine have added an arsenal of new tools (video link) to their repertoire for fighting the insidious Devil Facial Tumour Disease. (2020-07-02)
Illinois professor proposes guide for developing common data science approaches
University of Illinois information sciences professor Victoria Stodden proposes a way to develop recognized data science processes for research. (2020-06-25)
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