Current Stress News and Events

Current Stress News and Events, Stress News Articles.
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Stress in pregnancy may influence baby brain development
Infants' brains may be shaped by levels of stress their mother experiences during pregnancy, a brain scanning study has revealed. (2020-11-24)

Taking a shine to polymers: Fluorescent molecule betrays the breakdown of polymer materials
Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have come up with a simple method to evaluate the strength and performance of polymer materials. They present their innovation in the latest issue of Angewandte Chemie International Edition, and hope that their work will enable scientists and engineers to better evaluate the polymers they work with, and eventually synthesize better ones. (2020-11-24)

Sexual minorities, especially women, who misuse substances more likely to have psychiatric disorders
More than half of lesbian, gay and bisexual individuals who misuse alcohol or tobacco also have a co-occurring psychiatric disorder, compared to one-third of heterosexuals, a new University of Michigan study finds. (2020-11-20)

Drug eases recovery for those with severe alcohol withdrawal
Yale scientists say a drug originally developed to treat high blood pressure can reduce severe withdrawal symptoms for patients diagnosed with alcohol use disorder. (2020-11-19)

Virtual reality helps measure vulnerability to stress
Behavioral scientists at EPFL have developed a virtual reality test that assesses a person's vulnerability to stress while exploring immersive environments. The resulting model offers the field of stress research one of the first such tools that does not rely on subjective evaluations. (2020-11-19)

Despite industry wariness, stress tests found to strengthen banks of all sizes
Despite additional costs, increased restrictions, and issues stemming from compliance directives, research recently published by Raffi E. Garcia, an assistant professor in the Lally School of Management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute shows that government-mandated stress tests are effective in strengthening the overall health of the multi-trillion-dollar American banking industry. (2020-11-17)

Highly sensitive detection of circularly polarized light without a filter
Japanese scientists developed a photodiode using a crystalline film composed of lead perovskite compounds with organic chiral molecules to detect circularly polarized light without a filter. It is expected as a technology for visualization of the invisible change of object surfaces such as stress intensity and distribution. (2020-11-16)

Peptide is a key mediator in the regulation of compulsive alcohol drinking
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have identified that a peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating mediator of compulsive consumption of alcohol. In addition, they have discovered that this protein acts in an area of the brain called the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis, or BNST, a region involved in fear, anxiety and stress responses, to exert these effects. (2020-11-16)

Mediterranean diet helps reduce effects of stress in animal model, study shows
Even before the pandemic and the presidential election, Americans reported some of the highest perceived levels of stress in the world, according to the American Psychological Association. Not only does stress have negative effects on work and personal relationships, it also increases the risk of many chronic conditions, such as heart disease and Alzheimer's disease, and is associated with higher mortality rates. (2020-11-16)

Low levels of choline in pregnant Black American women associated with higher levels of stress
Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that many pregnant Black Americans have low levels of choline, an essential nutrient that aids in prenatal brain development. Stress caused by institutional racism may play a role. (2020-11-16)

Cynical hostility presents a potential pathway to cardiovascular disease
Cynical hostility is a potential pathway to cardiovascular disease by preventing a healthy response to stress over time, according to a Baylor University study. (2020-11-16)

Teeth grinding and facial pain increase due to coronavirus stress and anxiety
The stress and anxiety experienced by the general population during Israel's first lockdown brought about a significant rise in orofacial and jaw pain, as well as jaw-clenching in the daytime and teeth-grinding at night, according to a new study from Tel Aviv University (TAU). (2020-11-16)

Be mindful: Study shows mindfulness might not work as you expect
If dispositional mindfulness can teach us anything about how we react to stress, it might be an unexpected lesson on its ineffectiveness at managing stress as it's happening, according to new research from the University at Buffalo. When the goal is ''not to sweat the small stuff,'' mindfulness appears to offer little toward achieving that end. (2020-11-13)

In a warming climate, can birds take the heat?
We don't know precisely how hot things will get as climate change marches on, but animals in the tropics may not fare as well as their temperate relatives. Many scientists think tropical animals, because they're accustomed to a more stable thermal environment, may be pushed beyond their limits quickly as temperatures soar. Yet, in a University of Illinois study, researchers show both temperate and tropical birds can handle acute heat stress better than expected. (2020-11-12)

Compounds block stress-enhanced nicotine intake in rats
Stress is a major cause of relapse after people quit smoking. Worrying situations, such as money or relationship problems, can affect neurotransmitter levels in the brain, leading former smokers to reach for a cigarette. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science have discovered that compounds that activate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors in the brain can keep rats from self-administering increased levels of nicotine during stressful conditions in an animal model for relapse. (2020-11-11)

Burnout can exacerbate work stress, further promoting a vicious circle
Work stress and burnout are mutually reinforcing; surprisingly, the effect of work stress on burnout is much smaller than the effect of burnout on work stress. (2020-11-10)

Chronic stress causes genetic changes in chickens
How can stress in animals be measured? Scientists from Uppsala University and elsewhere have now found that what are known as epigenetic biomarkers could be used to detect long-term exposure to stress in commercially raised chickens. This may, in time, lead to improved conditions in animal rearing. The study has been published in the journal Frontiers in Genetics. (2020-11-10)

When kids watch a lot of TV, parents may end up more stressed
The more TV kids watch, the more ads they see and the more likely they are to ask for things on shopping trips. That may contribute to parents' overall stress levels, researchers found. (2020-11-10)

Hormone differences
During birth, hormones in the body surge in both mother and baby, sent along by the nervous system. These stress hormones are there to spur delivery and to help a baby adapt to living outside the womb. A new study finds how one is born can have an effect on the amount of stress hormones released at the time of delivery. For example, vaginal delivery had the highest presence of birth signaling hormones. (2020-11-04)

CHOP genomic study reveals role for hypothalamus in inflammatory bowel disease
Using sophisticated 3D genomic mapping and integrating with public data resulting from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found significant genetic correlations between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and stress and depression. (2020-10-29)

Coral researchers find link between bacterial genus and disease susceptibility
Corals that appear healthy are more prone to getting sick when they're home to too many parasitic bacteria, new research at Oregon State University shows. (2020-10-28)

Workplace interruptions lead to physical stress
Using an experiment conducted in a simulated group office environment, ETH researchers have proved for the first time that repeated workplace interruptions cause the body to increase the release of stress hormones. And they do so to a higher degree than the perceived psychological stress. (2020-10-28)

COVID-19 anxiety linked to body image issues
A new study has found that anxiety and stress directly linked to COVID-19 could be causing a number of body image issues. The research, which involved 506 UK adults, found that worries linked to COVID-19 were associated with body dissatisfaction and a desire for thinness in women, and associated with body fat dissatisfaction and a desire for muscularity in men. (2020-10-22)

Gel instrumental in 3D bioprinting biological tissues
The eventual creation of replacement biological parts requires fully three-dimensional capabilities that two-dimensional and three-dimensional thin-film bioprinting cannot supply. Now, using a yield stress gel, Penn State engineers can place tiny aggregates of cells exactly where they want to build the complex shapes that will be necessary to replace bone, cartilage and other tissues. (2020-10-16)

The mental health impact of pandemics for front line health care staff
New research shows the impact that pandemics have on the mental health of front-line health care staff. Researchers investigated how treating patients in past pandemics such as SARS and MERS affected the mental health of front-line staff. They found that over a third experienced anxiety or depression, almost a quarter experienced PTSD. The team hope that their work will help highlight the impact that the Covid-19 pandemic could be having on the mental health of doctors and nurses worldwide. (2020-10-16)

Trees prefer the big city life
A new study examines how trees respond to different urban intensities by comparing tree size and age, foliage nitrogen signature, nutrient and heavy metal content and other factors in forests in Newark, Del., and Philadelphia, Pa. Not only were the trees acclimated to urban conditions in the higher density Philadelphia forests, but the red maples there were actually healthier and more productive compared to those surrounded by less urbanization in Newark. (2020-10-16)

New study examines what human physiology can tell us about how animals cope with stress
Research from the University of South Florida offers a novel perspective on how vertebrates may regulate flexibility in coping with stress. (2020-10-14)

Sweetpotato biodiversity can help increase climate-resilience of small-scale farming
Sweetpotato biodiversity can help increase climate-resilience of small-scale farming, according to the findings of a study undertaken by researchers from IRD, CIRAD and the CGIAR center, the International Potato Center (CIP). The findings of this global analysis of the intraspecific diversity of the sweetpotato--one of the world's most important food crops, demonstrate the role of this genetic diversity in the productivity and resilience of food and agricultural systems in the face of climate change. (2020-10-14)

Alcohol use changed right after COVID-19 lockdown
One in four adults reported a change in alcohol use almost immediately after stay-at-home orders were issued: 14% reported drinking more alcohol and reported higher levels of stress and anxiety than those who did not drink and those whose use stayed the same. The 11% who decreased their drinking also had higher levels of stress and anxiety--suggesting that any change in alcohol use may be associated with mental health issues. (2020-10-13)

2016 US presidential election associated with uptick in heart attacks and stroke
The hospitalization rate for acute cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in a large southern California health system was 1.62 times higher in the two days immediately after the 2016 presidential election when compared with the same two days in the week prior to the 2016 election. (2020-10-12)

Post-traumatic stress experienced by partners following miscarriage
One in 12 partners experience post-traumatic stress after miscarriage, suggests a new study. The research, led by Imperial College London, surveyed over 100 couples who had experienced early stage pregnancy loss (miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy before 12 weeks). (2020-10-09)

Stress-free gel
Researchers at The University of Tokyo studied a new mechanism of gelation using colloidal particles. By delaying the formation of gel networks after rigid-cluster formation, the final structure had less mechanical stress, leading to new gel production methods. (2020-10-08)

Mechanical forces of biofilms could play role in infections
Studying bacterial biofilms, EPFL scientists have discovered that mechanical forces within them are sufficient to deform the soft material they grow on, e.g. biological tissues, suggesting a ''mechanical'' mode of bacterial infection. (2020-10-08)

The effects of oxytocin on social anxiety depend on location, location, location
The findings of the study show that oxytocin produced in the BNST increases stress-induced social anxiety behaviors in mice. This may provide an explanation as to why oxytocin can sometimes have antisocial effects. (2020-10-07)

Reactions to perceived broken promises lead to workplace stress for police officers
Negative feelings resulting from perceived broken promises from employers within UK police forces are a major cause of workplace stress, according to new research at the University of Birmingham. (2020-10-05)

High throughput screening identifies molecules that reduce cellular stress
A new paper in the journal Science Advances describes the discovery of several promising small molecules that appear to reduce cellular stress in mouse skin cells and could lengthen life. (2020-10-03)

A factor limiting recovery from bleaching in corals
A joint research team has examined the effect of pre-exposure to heat stress on the capacity of symbiotic algae to infect cnidarian hosts using the Aiptasia (sea-anemone)-zooxanthellae (algae) model system. They discovered that the symbiotic algae lose their capacity to infect the host once they are exposed to heat stress. These results suggest that recovery from bleaching can be limited by the loss of symbiont infectivity following bleaching-inducing heat stress. (2020-10-02)

New clues about the link between stress and depression
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a protein in the brain that is important both for the function of the mood-regulating substance serotonin and for the release of stress hormones, at least in mice. The findings, which are published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, may have implications for the development of new drugs for depression and anxiety. (2020-10-02)

COVID-19 infects majority of bad dreams -- study
Researchers crowdsourced dream content from more than 800 people during the sixth week of the COVID-19 lockdown and found many experienced distressed dreams related to the pandemic. They used an algorithm to analyze and map the data into 33 themed clusters. The coronavirus haunted more than half of the 20 clusters classified as nightmares. The paper has implications for further studies related to mental health. (2020-10-01)

Research: COVID-19 is echoed in dreams
Research has shown that the exceptional circumstances brought about by the novel coronavirus have affected the nightmares people have. The Sleep and Mind research group at the University of Helsinki employed artificial intelligence to investigate people's dreams. (2020-10-01)

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