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Current Sudden oak death News and Events, Sudden oak death News Articles.
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Paramagnetic spins take electrons for a ride, produce electricity from heat
Local thermal perturbations of spins in a solid can convert heat to energy even in a paramagnetic material -- where spins weren't thought to correlate long enough to do so. (2019-09-13)
Heart attack patients take longer to call emergency when symptoms are gradual
Heart attack symptoms can be gradual or abrupt and both situations are a medical emergency. (2019-09-12)
Possible treatment breakthrough for the rare disease arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy
Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) and Puerta de Hierro hospital in Majadahonda have found a possible treatment for this disease. (2019-09-05)
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, September 2019
ORNL story tips: ORNL's project for VA bridges computing prowess, VA health data to speed up suicide risk screenings for US veterans; ORNL reveals ionic liquid additive lubricates better than additives in commercial gear oil; researchers use neutron scattering to probe colorful new material that could improve sensors, vivid displays; unique 3D printing approach adds more strength, toughness in certain materials. (2019-09-04)
Genetics may play a role in reaction to CT contrast agents
Researchers in South Korea have found that patients with family and personal history of allergic reactions to contrast media are at risk for future reactions, according to a new large study. (2019-09-03)
Deer browsing is not stopping the densification of Eastern forests
Selective browsing by white-tailed deer has been blamed by many for changing the character and composition of forest understories in the eastern US; however, its impact on the forest canopy was previously unknown. (2019-09-03)
Decline in sports-related sudden cardiac death linked with rise in bystander resuscitation
Fewer sports-related sudden cardiac arrest victims die nowadays, a trend linked with increased bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), reports a study presented today at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology.(1) The late breaking study also found that the incidence of sudden cardiac arrest during sports has not changed over the last decade. (2019-09-02)
Heart attack care in Sweden superior to UK
People suffering from heart attacks in Sweden were less likely to die from them in the short and long-term than those in England and Wales, according to a new study. (2019-09-02)
Testing and family screening lacking among young victims of sudden cardiac arrest
Less than 4% of relatives of young cardiac arrest victims receive information on family screening that could prevent further deaths, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology. (2019-09-01)
Greater left ventricular mass increases risk of heart failure
Elevated left ventricular mass, known as left-ventricular hypertrophy, is a stronger predictor of coronary artery disease-related death and heart failure than coronary artery calcium score, according to a new study. (2019-08-27)
Astrophysicists link brightening of pulsar wind nebula to pulsar spin-down rate transition
Astrophysicists have discovered that the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) surrounding the famous pulsar B0540-69 brightened gradually after the pulsar experienced a sudden spin-down rate transition (SRT). (2019-08-26)
Study finds air pollution linked to risk of premature death
A new international study has found that air pollution is linked to increased cardiovascular and respiratory death rates. (2019-08-21)
Vaping impairs vascular function
Inhaling a vaporized liquid solution through an e-cigarette, otherwise known as vaping, immediately impacts vascular function even when the solution does not include nicotine, according to the results of a new study. (2019-08-20)
Selective coronary angiography following cardiac arrest
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 2, pp. (2019-08-15)
Microbes have adapted to live on food that is hundreds of years old
Microbial communities living in deep aquatic sediments have adapted to survive on degraded organic matter, according to a study published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology and coauthored by professors at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (2019-08-13)
ADHD medication may affect brain development in children
A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect the development of the brain's signal-carrying white matter in children with the disorder, according to a new study. (2019-08-13)
National report card rates states' safety policies for high school athletes
In the two years since the Korey Stringer Institute (KSI) first assessed all 50 states and the District of Columbia on key health and safety policies for high school athletes, 31 states have adopted new policies -- 16 this year alone. (2019-08-12)
Scientists at DGIST discovered how chronic stress causes brain damage
Chronic stress induces autophagic death of adult hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). (2019-08-09)
Supercomputing improves biomass fuel conversion
Pretreating plant biomass with THF-water causes lignin globules on the cellulose surface to expand and break away from one another and the cellulose fibers. (2019-08-01)
Sudden hearing loss: Update to guideline to improve implementation and awareness
The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation published the Clinical Practice Guideline: Sudden Hearing Loss (Update) today in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. (2019-08-01)
Is your supercomputer stumped? There may be a quantum solution
A new study led by a Berkeley Lab physicist details how a quantum computing technique called 'quantum annealing' can be used to solve problems relevant to fundamental questions in nuclear physics about the subatomic building blocks of all matter. (2019-08-01)
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 2019
ORNL story tips: Training next-generation sensors to 'see,' interpret live data; 3D printing tungsten could protect fusion reactor components; detailed study estimated how much more, or less, energy US residents might consume by 2050 based on seasonal weather shifts; astrophysicists used ORNL supercomputer to create highest-ever-resolution galactic wind simulations; new solar-thermal desalination method improves energy efficiency. (2019-08-01)
Unmasking the hidden burden of tuberculosis in Mozambique
The real burden of tuberculosis is probably higher than estimated, according to a study on samples from autopsies performed in a Mozambican hospital. (2019-08-01)
Autopsies reveal how meth hurts the heart
Autopsy samples reveal that methamphetamine use makes dangerous structural changes in heart muscle that increase the risk of heart attack, sudden cardiac death and heart failure. (2019-08-01)
AI improves efficiency and accuracy of digital breast tomosynthesis
Artificial intelligence (AI) helps improve the efficiency and accuracy of an advanced imaging technology used to screen for breast cancer, according to a new study. (2019-07-31)
Smoking impedes embolization treatment in lungs
Smoking reduces the chances of a successful procedure to treat blood vessel abnormalities in the lungs, according to a new study. (2019-07-30)
Scientists reproduce the dynamics behind astrophysical shocks
Article describes first laboratory measurement of the precursors to high-energy astronomical shocks. (2019-07-30)
Tobacco industry has bumped up prices beyond that required by tax changes
The tobacco industry has bumped up the prices for its products beyond that required by tax changes, even when tax rises were large and unexpected, reveal the findings of research published online in the journal Tobacco Control. (2019-07-25)
Accidental infant deaths in bed tripled from 1999 to 2016 in the US
Although sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has been on the decline, a new study shows that infant deaths from accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed have more than tripled between 1999 and 2016 in the US with increases in racial inequalities. (2019-07-24)
ORNL scientists make fundamental discovery to creating better crops
A team of scientists led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory have discovered the specific gene that controls an important symbiotic relationship between plants and soil fungi, and successfully facilitated the symbiosis in a plant that typically resists it. (2019-07-22)
BU finds workplace injuries contribute to rise in suicide, overdose deaths
A new study finds that workplace injury significantly raises a person's risk of suicide or overdose death, contributing to a trend that has lowered US life expectancy in recent years. (2019-07-22)
New study works with historically disenfranchised communities to combat sudden oak death
Science often reflects the priorities of dominant industries and ignores the needs of disenfranchised communities, resulting in the perpetuation of historical injustices. (2019-07-17)
Researchers build transistor-like gate for quantum information processing -- with qudits
Purdue University researchers are among the first to build what could be a quantum version of a transistor -- with qudits. (2019-07-16)
Sudden cardiac arrest in athletes: Prevention and management
It's marathon season, and every so often a news report will focus on an athlete who has collapsed from sudden cardiac arrest. (2019-07-15)
The best of both worlds: how to solve real problems on modern quantum computers
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, along with researchers at Clemson University and Fujitsu Laboratories of America, have developed hybrid algorithms to run on size-limited quantum machines and have demonstrated them for practical applications. (2019-07-11)
Discovered: A new way to measure the stability of next-generation magnetic fusion devices
Feature reports discovery of an alternative method for measuring the stability of fusion plasma, a critical task for researchers seeking to bring the fusion that powers the sun to Earth. (2019-07-10)
Adults with type 2 diabetes face high risk of dying from cancer
Cancer has overtaken cardiovascular disease as the most common cause of death in Scottish adults with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation. (2019-07-03)
The global prevalence of erectile dysfunction
A review of published studies found that estimates for the global prevalence of erectile dysfunction vary widely, ranging from 3% to 76.5%. (2019-07-03)
Depression is common and linked with early death in patients with blood cancers
In a Psycho-Oncology study of patients newly diagnosed with lymphoma or multiple myeloma, one-third of participants reported depressive symptoms around the time of diagnosis, and depressive symptoms were linked with shorter survival. (2019-07-03)
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, July 2019
ORNL story tips: Study of waste soft drinks for carbon capture could help cut carbon dioxide emissions; sharing secret messages among three parties using quantum communications just got more practical for better cybersecurity; designed synthetic polymers can serve as high-performance binding material for next-generation li-ion batteries; high-fidelity modeling for predicting radiation interactions outside reactor core could keep nuclear reactors running longer; scientists looking to neural networks to create computers that mimic human brain. (2019-07-01)
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