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Story tips: Shuffling atoms, thinning forests, fusion assembly and nuclear medicine
ORNL Story Tips: Shuffling atoms, thinning forests, fusion assembly and nuclear medicine. (2020-06-02)
Glucocorticoids are harmful in treating viral respiratory infections
Glucocorticoids, which are widely used as treatment in intensive care, can nearly quadruple the death rate of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome. (2020-05-29)
Global environmental changes leading to shorter, younger trees
Ongoing environmental changes are transforming forests worldwide, resulting in shorter and younger trees. (2020-05-28)
First study of COVID-19 patients with diabetes shows that 10% die within seven days of hospital admission
The first study of COVID-19 to specifically analyse the effect of the disease in hospitalised patients with diabetes has found that one in ten patients dies within 7 days of hospital admission, and one in five is intubated and mechanically ventilated by this point. (2020-05-28)
Climate could cause abrupt British vegetation changes
Climate change could cause abrupt shifts in the amount of vegetation growing in parts of Great Britain, new research shows. (2020-05-28)
Bullying is common factor in LGBTQ youth suicides, YSPH study finds
Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have found that death records of LGBTQ youth who died by suicide were substantially more likely to mention bullying as a factor than their non-LGBTQ peers. (2020-05-27)
1ST COVID autopsy series by LSUHealthNO pathologists reveals new cardiopulmonary findings
LSU Health New Orleans pathologists performed the first series of autopsies on African Americans who died from COVID-19 in New Orleans, and their findings provide new and critical information to guide patient management. (2020-05-27)
Bullying is common factor in LGBTQ youth suicides, Yale study finds
Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have found that death records of LGBTQ youth who died by suicide were substantially more likely to mention bullying as a factor than their non-LGBTQ peers. (2020-05-26)
Fatal Lyme carditis in a 37-year-old man shows need for awareness of unusual symptoms
Physicians and the public should be aware of the different presentations of Lyme disease, as people spend more time outside in the warmer weather and as areas in Canada where the black legged tick is found expand. (2020-05-25)
Epilepsy-related deaths common in young adults and are not reducing, new research shows
A new study due to be presented at the European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Virtual Congress shows the burden of potentially avoidable epilepsy-related deaths in young adults remains large, with those aged between 16 and 24 having a six-fold increased risk of epilepsy-related death. (2020-05-24)
No improvement in death rate for COVID-19 patients who received hydroxychloroquine
A research team led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital has evaluated real-world evidence related to outcomes for COVID-19 patients who were treated with hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine analogues (with or without a macrolide). (2020-05-22)
Six-month follow-up appropriate for BI-RADS 3 findings on mammography
Women with mammographically detected breast lesions that are probably benign should have follow-up surveillance imaging at six months due to the small but not insignificant risk that the lesions are malignant, according to a new study. (2020-05-19)
Advanced X-ray technology tells us more about Ménière's disease
The organ of balance in the inner ear is surrounded by the hardest bone in the body. (2020-05-19)
Walking or cycling to work associated with reduced risk of early death and illness
People who walk, cycle and travel by train to work are at reduced risk of early death or illness compared with those who commute by car. (2020-05-19)
Story tips: Mining for COVID, rules to grow by and the 3D connection
ORNL story Tips: Mining for COVID, rules to grow by and the 3D connection. (2020-05-18)
Graphene-reinforced carbon fiber may lead to affordable, stronger car materials
A new way of creating carbon fibers -- which are typically expensive to make -- could one day lead to using these lightweight, high-strength materials to improve safety and reduce the cost of producing cars, according to a team of researchers. (2020-05-18)
'Cells-soldiers' turned to be more resistant than 'cells-combat medics'
Researchers from Sechenov University (Russia) and University of Pittsburgh (USA) discovered that the resistance of innate immune cells, macrophages, to ferroptosis -- a type of programmed cell death -- depends on the type of their activation. (2020-05-16)
Learning what's dangerous is costly, but social animals have a way of lowering the price
For social animals, such as humans, being able to recognize the presence of a threat in the behavior of others could literally be a life-saver. (2020-05-12)
High calcium levels in mitochondria linked to neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease
For the first time, using a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have documented a link between raised levels of calcium in mitochondria and neuronal death in the living brain. (2020-05-12)
Imaging reveals bowel abnormalities in patients with COVID-19
Patients with COVID-19 can have bowel abnormalities, including ischemia, according to a new study published today in the journal Radiology. (2020-05-11)
Stroke evaluations drop by nearly 40% during COVID-19 pandemic
A study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2020-05-08)
Stem cells shown to delay their own death to aid healing
A new study shows how stem cells -- which can contribute to creating many parts of the body, not just one organ or body part -- are able to postpone their own death in order to respond to an injury that needs their attention. (2020-05-07)
Story tips: Tracking populations, UPS' special delivery and a long-awaited benchmark
ORNL Story Tips: Tracking populations, UPS' special delivery and a long-awaited benchmark. (2020-05-05)
Simulations forecast nationwide increase in human exposure to extreme climate events
Using ORNL's now-decommissioned Titan supercomputer, a team of researchers estimated the combined consequences of many different extreme climate events at the county level, a unique approach that provided unprecedented regional and national climate projections that identified the areas most likely to face climate-related challenges. (2020-05-05)
Electrocardiogram shows value in college athletes' screens
Research published today indicates that screenings that incorporate an ECG are more effective at detecting cardiac conditions that put athletes at risk, and more efficient in terms of cost-per-diagnosis of at-risk players, than screenings involving only a physical exam and patient history. (2020-05-04)
A new way to accurately estimate COVID-19 death toll
A Rutgers engineer has created a mathematical model that accurately estimates the death toll linked to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States and could be used around the world. (2020-04-30)
RSNA AI challenge breaks new ground
An unprecedented collaboration among two medical societies and over 60 volunteer neuroradiologists has resulted in the generation of the largest public collection of expert-annotated brain hemorrhage CT images, according to a report published in Radiology: Artificial Intelligence. (2020-04-29)
Ribosome biogenesis gene DEF/UTP25 is essential for liver homeostasis and regeneration
Digestive-organ-expansion-factor (Def) is a nucleolar factor. Depletion of Def causes hypoplastic digestive organs in zebrafish. (2020-04-28)
Connecting the dots between heart disease, potential for worse COVID-19 outcomes
People with certain heart diseases may be more susceptible to worse outcomes with COVID-19, but the reason why has remained unknown. (2020-04-27)
Oak genomics proves its worth
A landmark 10 article collection published in the April 16 issue of New Phytologist helps clarify the evolution of oaks and identify key genes involved in oak adaptation to environmental transitions and resistance to pathogens. (2020-04-20)
New economic model may prevent stops of capital flow
The 'sudden stops of capital flows' model enables the adequacy of macroeconomic policies, one year in advance, against the risk of a sudden contraction of international. investments. (2020-04-17)
Nanoparticles: Acidic alert
Researchers of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have synthesized nanoparticles that can be induced by a change in pH to release a deadly dose of ionized iron within cells. (2020-04-17)
Review assesses stem cell therapy potential for treating preeclampsia
A review of using stem cells to treat preeclampsia, a dangerous condition in pregnancy, indicates that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs), or their secreted vesicles, have the potential to be used as therapies that could progress to clinical trials. (2020-04-16)
Some worms programmed to die early for sake of colony
Some worms are genetically predisposed to die before reaching old age, which appears to benefit the colony by reducing food demand, finds a new UCL-led study published in Aging Cell. (2020-04-16)
Discovering the secrets of the enigmatic caspase-6
Researchers identified the mechanisms underlying the innate immune function of the enzyme caspase-6, offering ways to combat viral infection, inflammatory diseases and cancer. (2020-04-15)
Your nose may know more when it comes to COVID-19
A University of Cincinnati expert says the loss of smell without nasal obstruction is 'a highly specific indicator of COVID-19.' (2020-04-14)
Celiac disease linked to increased risk of premature death
People with celiac disease have increased risk of dying prematurely, despite increased awareness of the disease in recent years and better access to gluten-free food. (2020-04-07)
Story tips: Molding matter atom by atom and seeing inside uranium particles
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Molding matter atom by atom and seeing inside uranium particles (2020-04-02)
Cancer research, the guardian of the genome has a new ally
They identified a protein that, like a switch, controls the onset of cell death processes in cancer cells, which are regulated by p53, the protein known as 'the guardian of the genome.' The findings will be used to develop more tailored and effective cancer treatments. (2020-03-31)
Risk of death from stroke falls by 24%
Thousands more patients each year are surviving strokes, as the risk of death and disability after a stroke fell significantly between 2000 and 2015, according to analysis by Guy's and St Thomas' researchers. (2020-03-30)
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