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Why does your cotton towel get stiff after natural drying?
The remaining 'bound water' on cotton surfaces cross-link single fibers of cotton, causing hardening after natural drying, according to a new study conducted by Kao Corporation and Hokkaido University. (2020-03-27)
Worldwide scientific collaboration unveils genetic architecture of gray matter
For the first time, more 360 scientists from 184 different institutions -- including UNC-Chapel Hill -- have contributed to a global effort to find more than 200 regions of the genome and more than 300 specific genetic variations that affect the structure of the cerebral cortex and likely play important roles in psychiatric and neurological conditions. (2020-03-26)
'Whiskey webs' are the new 'coffee ring effect'
Spilled coffee forms a ring as the liquid evaporates, depositing solids along the edge of the puddle. (2020-03-25)
CAR T-cell therapy for solid tumors may advance cancer treatments
The full title of the research is 'The study of the mechanisms of effectiveness of T-cells CAR-T towards solid tumors'; it was supported by nonprofit RakFond (Cancer Fund) and CyStoreLab (a resident of Skolkovo). (2020-03-25)
Study shows how diligent we have to be to keep surfaces germ-free
A recent study suggests that even organized efforts to clean surfaces can fall short, a reminder for us all that keeping our surroundings clean may require some additional work. (2020-03-25)
New model helps explain seasonal variations in urban heat islands
Rising temperatures and shifting rainfall patterns linked to climate change may alter the seasonality of urban heat islands in coming decades. (2020-03-24)
New research shows promise to treat female group A streptococcus genital tract infections
Puerperal sepsis, also known as childbed fever, is the leading cause of maternal deaths. (2020-03-19)
NASA finds little strength left in Tropical Cyclone Herold
Wind shear pushed former Tropical Cyclone Herold apart and infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed the system with very little strength remaining. (2020-03-19)
How molecules self-assemble into superstructures
Most technical functional units are built bit by bit according to a well-designed construction plan. (2020-03-19)
Hayabusa2's big 'impact' on understanding asteroid Ryugu's age and surface cohesion
After an explosive device on the Hayabusa2 spacecraft fired a copper cannonball a bit larger than a tennis ball into the near-Earth asteroid Ryugu, creating an artificial impact crater on it, researchers understand more about the asteroid's age and composition, they say. (2020-03-19)
Symmetry-enforced three-dimension Dirac phononic crystals
Dirac semimetals are critical states of topologically distinct phases. Such gapless topological states have been accomplished by a band-inversion mechanism, in which the Dirac points can be annihilated pairwise by perturbations without changing the symmetry of the system. (2020-03-19)
New experimental, theoretical evidence identifies jacutingaite as dual-topology insulator
New collaborative work involving NCCR MARVEL researchers has given additional insight into the nature of jacutingaite (Pt2HgSe3), a species of platinum-group mineral first discovered in a Brazilian mine in 2008. (2020-03-15)
New study presents hygroscopic micro/nanolenses along carbon nanotube ion channels
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel technology, which allows carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to be easily observed under room temperature. (2020-03-13)
Ammonium salts reveal reservoir of 'missing' nitrogen in comets
Substantial amounts of ammonium salts have been identified in the surface material of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, researchers report, likely revealing the reservoir of nitrogen that was previously thought to be 'missing' in comets. (2020-03-12)
Wetting property of Li metal with graphite
Compositing two classic anode materials, graphite and Li metal, has shown promising performance to go beyond the traditional Li-ion batteries. (2020-03-10)
APS tip sheet: Understanding the tears of wine
New research explores the fluid dynamics behind a phenomenon known as tears of wine (2020-03-10)
Leaf-inspired surface prevents frost formation
By tweaking the texture of any material's surface, researchers experimentally reduced frost formation by up to 60%. (2020-03-10)
Why do sea turtles eat ocean plastics? New research points to smell
The findings are the first demonstration that the smell of ocean plastics causes animals to eat them. (2020-03-09)
Fast and furious: New class of 2D materials stores electrical energy
Like a battery,MXenes can store large amounts of electrical energy through electrochemical reactions- but unlike batteries,can be charged and discharged in a matter of seconds. (2020-03-03)
Dragonflies are efficient predators
A study led by the University of Turku, Finland, has found that small, fiercely predatory damselflies catch and eat hundreds of thousands of insects during a single summer -- in an area surrounding just a single pond. (2020-03-03)
Is there a technological solution to aquatic dead zones?
Could pumping oxygen-rich surface water into the depths of lakes, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters help ameliorate dangerous dead zones? (2020-03-02)
Tadpoles break the tension with bubble-sucking
When it comes to the smallest of creatures, the hydrogen bonds that hold water molecules together to form 'surface tension' lend enough strength to support their mass: think of insects that skip across the surface of water. (2020-02-26)
Observation of non-trivial superconductivity on surface of type II Weyl semimetal TaIrTe4
The search for unconventional superconductivity in Weyl semimetal materials is currently an exciting pursuit, since such superconducting phases could potentially be topologically non-trivial and host exotic Majorana modes. (2020-02-25)
Living cell imaging technique sheds light on molecular view of obesity
Researchers have developed novel probes to track cellular events that can lead to obesity. (2020-02-24)
Greener spring, warmer air
Advanced leaf-out enhances annual surface warming in the Northern Hemisphere (2020-02-21)
Russian scientists found an effective way to obtain fuel for hydrogen engines
A catalyst is needed for a chemical process that releases hydrogen from an H2O molecule. (2020-02-20)
How learning about fish can help us save the Amazon rainforest
They might not be as popular as jaguars and parrots, but fish hold the key to lots of the Amazon rainforest's secrets. (2020-02-17)
The Lancet Psychiatry: Life-course-persistent antisocial behaviour may be associated with differences in brain structure
Individuals who exhibit life-course-persistent antisocial behaviour - for example, stealing, aggression and violence, bullying, lying, or repeated failure to take care of work or school responsibilities - may have thinner cortex and smaller surface area in regions of the brain previously implicated in studies of antisocial behaviour more broadly, compared to individuals without antisocial behaviour, according to an observational study of 672 participants published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. (2020-02-17)
Earth's glacial cycles enhanced by Antarctic sea-ice
A 784,000 year climate simulation suggests that Southern Ocean sea ice significantly reduces deep ocean ventilation to the atmosphere during glacial periods by reducing both atmospheric exposure of surface waters and vertical mixing of deep ocean waters; in a global carbon cycle model, these effects led to a 40 ppm reduction in atmospheric CO2 during glacial periods relative to pre-industrial level, suggesting how sea ice can drive carbon sequestration early within a glacial cycle. (2020-02-17)
The origins of roughness
A Freiburg researcher investigates the origins of surface texture. (2020-02-17)
Our memory prefers essence over form
What clues does our memory use to connect a current situation to a situation from the past? (2020-02-14)
Air pollution's tiny particles may trigger nonfatal heart attacks, Yale study finds
A Yale-affiliated scientist finds that even a few hours' exposure to ambient ultrafine particles common in air pollution may potentially trigger a nonfatal heart attack. (2020-02-14)
Movement of a liquid droplet generates over 5 volts of electricity
Scientists have developed an energy harvesting device that generates over 5 volts of electricity from a liquid droplet. (2020-02-13)
Scientists propose new properties in hollow multishell structure
A new study led by Prof. WANG Dan from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences proposes a novel concept of temporal-spatial ordering and dynamic smart behavior in HoMSs. (2020-02-13)
Capillary shrinkage triggers high-density porous structure
The capillary shrinkage of graphene oxide hydrogels was investigated to illustrate the relationship between the surface tension of the evaporating solvent and the associated capillary force, which was released by Quan-Hong Yang et al. in Science China Materials. (2020-02-13)
A close-up of Arrokoth reveals how planetary building blocks were constructed
The farthest, most primitive object in the Solar System ever to be visited by a spacecraft - a bi-lobed Kuiper Belt Object known as Arrokoth -- is described in detail in three new reports. (2020-02-13)
mystery solved: Why ocean's carbon budget plummets beyond the twilight zone
Helping fill a gap in the understanding of the biological carbon pump -- a major climate regulator -- a new study shows that fragmentation of large organic particles into small ones accounts for roughly half of particle loss in the ocean, making it perhaps the most important process controlling the sequestration of sinking organic carbon in the oceans. (2020-02-13)
Polymers to the rescue! Saving cells from damaging ice
Research published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society by University of Utah chemists Pavithra Naullage and Valeria Molinero provides the foundation to design efficient polymers that can prevent the growth of ice that damages cells. (2020-02-13)
Researchers: Synthetic chemicals in soils are 'ticking time bomb'
Synthetic chemicals that were released into the environment for the first time 80 years ago have been linked to harmful health effects, and more of them are migrating slowly from the soil, according to University of Arizona research. (2020-02-11)
Oblique electrostatic inject-deposited TiO2 film leads efficient perovskite solar cells
Kanazawa University researchers used a novel technique to deposit TiO2 layers for efficient perovskite solar cells (PSCs). (2020-02-10)
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