Current Surface tension News and Events

Current Surface tension News and Events, Surface tension News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Palladium, meet copper: Skoltech researchers use machine learning to improve catalysts
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues from Germany and the US have studied the properties and behavior of a palladium-copper alloy under changing temperatures and hydrogen concentrations, with highly relevant implications of this research for catalyst design. The authors hope that their findings can open the door for designing metal alloys with better catalytic properties by taking into account dynamic changes in the composition and structure of materials at realistic operational conditions. (2020-11-17)

Relaxing cell divisions
During one lifetime, the human body experiences ten quadrillion cell divisions. This biological process is essential to form and maintain tissues and organs within the body. Now, Professor Carl-Philipp Heisenberg and his team at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria discovered how mechanical tension from surrounding tissue influences the division process. The scientists published their study in the journal Developmental Cell. This study presents an entirely new influence on cell division and could also be important for tumor research. (2020-11-17)

Oil droplet predators chase oil droplet prey
Oil droplets can be made to act like predators, chasing down other droplets that flee like prey mimicking behavior seen among living organisms. (2020-11-17)

Peel-off coating keeps desalination cleaner and greener
A polyelectrolyte coating enables clean seawater desalination systems without harmful chemicals. (2020-11-16)

A new diagnostic method predicts which cancer patients will respond to immunothe
An international group led by Dr Banafshe Larijani, an Ikerbasque researcher seconded to the Biofisika Institute (UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country, CSIC), has developed a new diagnostic method making it possible to accurately predict which cancer patients will respond positively to immunotherapy. This method will allow oncologists to tailor treatment to each patient and avoid therapies that are not going to be successful. (2020-11-16)

RUDN University chemists developed cheap and eco-friendly surfactants
An international team including chemists from RUDN University suggested an economically feasible and environmentally friendly method to synthesize surfactants. The new compounds can become an eco-friendly alternative to traditional chemicals used in oil production, skincare products manufacture, and in the pharmaceutical industry to transport drugs to diseased body tissues. (2020-11-12)

Electrochemical oxygen evolution on Hf2B2Ir5 electrode material
Electrochemical oxygen evolution on Hf2B2Ir5 electrode material. (2020-11-11)

Silicone surface mimics topology, wettability of a real human tongue
The tongue helps people taste food, but structures on its surface also help them sense textures -- something that's also very important when savoring a meal. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have made a 3D silicone surface that, for the first time, closely mimics the surface features of the human tongue. The material could help food scientists study mechanical interactions of foods, liquids and medicines with the organ. (2020-11-11)

Getting single-crystal diamond ready for electronics
Researchers from Osaka University and collaborating partners polished single-crystal diamond to near-atomic smoothness without damaging it. This will improve the performance and sustainability of future electronics. (2020-11-10)

SwRI scientist studies tiny craters on Bennu boulders to understand asteroid's age
Last week NASA snagged a sample from the surface of asteroid Bennu, an Empire State Building-sized body that Southwest Research Institute scientists have helped map with nearly unprecedented precision. Using orbital data from the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft, researchers measured centimeter- to meter-sized craters on the boulders scattered around its rugged surface to shed light on the age of the asteroid. (2020-11-10)

Germanium telluride's hidden properties at the nanoscale revealed
Germanium Telluride is an interesting candidate material for spintronic devices. In a comprehensive study at BESSY II, a Helmholtz-RSF Joint Research Group has now revealed how the spin texture switches by ferroelectric polarization within individual nanodomains. (2020-11-06)

Water striders learn from experience how to jump up safely from water surface
Water striders jump upwards from the water surface without breaking it. This study shows that they learn through personal experience, just like we do, to adjust leg movements to their body weight and to jump without breaking the water surface. Only females do that. A female water strider needs this skill to adjust locomotion to the change in her weight each time when a male rides on he back during mating. (2020-11-05)

Clay subsoil at Earth's driest place may signal life on Mars
Diverse microbes discovered in the clay-rich, shallow soil layers in Chile's dry Atacama Desert suggest that similar deposits below the Martian surface may contain microorganisms, which could be easily found by future rover missions or landing craft. (2020-11-05)

A material that "bruises"like the skin?
Human skin bruises when the tissue and muscle in the area suffer trauma or become damaged due to an application of blunt force. when an object suffers an impact that is expected to damage, If the areas damaged by a physical impact undergo a change in color, just like human skin, it will be easy to distinguish what needs to be repaired. (2020-11-04)

New artificial skin functions like natural skin
Researchers at RIKEN in Japan have developed an improved human-skin equivalent that reproduces a property that controls the structure and physiological function of skin. This artificial skin will enhance in-depth analyses of physiological skin functions, provide solutions to skin problems caused by diseases or ageing, and reduce the need for animal testing. (2020-10-30)

Geologists simulate soil conditions to help grow plants on Mars
Humankind's next giant step may be onto Mars. But before those missions can begin, scientists need to make scores of breakthrough advances, including learning how to grow crops on the red planet. (2020-10-27)

How cells use mechanical tension sensors to interact with their environment
In a painstaking experiment, scientists suspended a single protein filament between two microscopic beads. Their results have shed light on an elusive process in which cells receive and respond to mechanical cues. (2020-10-26)

OSIRIS-REx TAGs surface of asteroid Bennu
Captured on Oct. 20, 2020 during the OSIRIS-REx mission's Touch-And-Go (TAG) sample collection event, this series of images shows the SamCam imager's field of view as the NASA spacecraft approaches and touches down on asteroid Bennu's surface, over 200 million miles away from Earth. (2020-10-22)

New tool pulls elusive COVID-19 marker from human blood
Researchers at McMaster University and SQI Diagnostics in Canada have created a surface that repels every other element of human blood except an elusive cytokine critical to understanding the progress of COVID-19 in individual patients. (2020-10-20)

Sludge-powered bacteria generate more electricity, faster
A new electroactive bacterium could help fuel wastewater treatment reactors. (2020-10-19)

Novel mechanical mechanism of metastatic cancer cells in substrates of different stiffness revealed
Metastasis, the spread of cancer cells to a different body part from where it started, is considered as the most dangerous phase of cancer development. When cancer cells break away from the main tumor and enter the bloodstream or lymphatic system, they can travel to anywhere of the body, proliferate and creating a secondary tumor in a new location. It is often said that metastasis is responsible for around 90% of cancer deaths. (2020-10-16)

Cartilage-Inspired, Lipid-Based and Super Slippery Synthetic Hydrogels
Drawing inspiration from the mechanisms that lubricate the cartilage in our joints over a lifetime of wear, researchers designed extremely slippery hydrogels with self-renewing, lipid-based boundary layers, which result in a near 100-fold reduction in friction and wear over other hydrogels. (2020-10-15)

Surface waves can help nanostructured devices keep their cool
A research team led by The Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo demonstrated that hybrid surface waves called surface phonon-polaritons provide enhanced thermal conductivity in nanoscale membranes. These surface waves can aid in the thermal management of nanostructured devices as conventional cooling methods reach their material-related limits. Surface phonon-polaritons will be particularly useful for heat conduction in silicon-based microelectronics and photonics applications. (2020-10-12)

Sapphires show their true colors: Not water-loving
The researchers investigated the wetting behavior of four different crystal surfaces of sapphire (alumina) single crystal and found that although the surface of polycrystalline alumina is hydrophilic (water contact angle was about 10°), the intrinsic water contact angles of all four crystal surfaces are greater than 10°. Among them, the (1-102) crystal surface is intrinsic hydrophobic, which water contact angle is close to 90°. (2020-10-10)

What tiny surfing robots teach us about surface tension
Propelled by chemical changes in surface tension, microrobots surfing across fluid interfaces lead researchers to new ideas. (2020-10-09)

Ants adapt tool use to avoid drowning
Researchers have observed black imported fire ants using sand to draw liquid food out of containers, when faced with the risk of drowning. This is the first time this sophisticated tool use has been reported in animals. These findings are published in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology. (2020-10-08)

New findings from OSIRIS-REx detail complex history of Asteroid Bennu
Six new studies in Science and Science Advances present results from the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft and reveal insights about the near-Earth asteroid Bennu. (2020-10-08)

SwRI scientists study the rugged surface of near-Earth asteroid Bennu
As the days count down to NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft's Touch-And-Go asteroid sample collection attempt, Southwest Research Institute scientists have helped determine what the spacecraft can expect to return from the near-Earth asteroid Bennu's surface. Three papers published online by Science on Oct. 8 discuss the color, reflectivity, age, composition, origin and distribution of materials that make up the asteroid's rough surface. (2020-10-08)

Molecular swarm rearranges surface structures atom by atom
Researchers at the University of Münster have now developed a molecular tool which makes it possible, at the atomic level, to change the structure of a metal surface. The restructuring of the surface by individual molecules - so-called N-heterocyclic carbenes - takes place similar to a zipper. The study has been published in the journal ''Angewandte Chemie International Edition''. (2020-10-07)

Printing organic transistors
Researchers successfully print and demonstrate organic transistors, electronic switches, which can operate close to their theoretical speed limits. They showed high-speed operation only requires low voltages to work, which would reduce the power consumption of their applications. These kinds of transistors are used in display technology such as liquid crystal display (LCD) screens and e-ink. This is the first time this kind of transistor has been printed and it could lead to new curved, flexible and even wearable low power devices. (2020-10-07)

High blood pressure linked to baroreflex in rats
Researchers describe a newly observed phenomenon in the way blood pressure is maintained in certain rats. (2020-10-03)

Nitric oxide a possible treatment for COVID-19
Researchers at Uppsala University have found that an effective way of treating the coronavirus behind the 2003 SARS epidemic also works on the closely related SARS-CoV-2 virus, the culprit in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The substance concerned is nitric oxide (NO), a compound with antiviral properties that is produced by the body itself. The study is published in the journal Redox Biology. (2020-10-02)

Texas A&M study: Marine heatwaves can strengthen hurricanes
Oceanographers have found that a hurricane can be considerably strengthened in the Gulf of Mexico through the compounding effects of two extreme weather events. This process could continue in the future as ocean temperatures continue to rise around the world, according to a study co-authored by a Texas A&M University at Galveston professor. (2020-09-30)

Discovery enables adult skin to regenerate like a newborn's
A newly identified genetic factor allows adult skin to repair itself like the skin of a newborn. The discovery has implications for wound treatment and preventing some of the aging process in skin. Researchers identified a factor in the skin of baby mice controlling hair follicle formation. When it was activated in adult mice, their skin was able to heal wounds without scarring. The reformed skin even included fur and could make goose bumps. (2020-09-29)

Scientists studied nanoparticles embedded in silver-ion-exchanged glasses
Researchers have registered the formation of silver nanoparticles in an ion-exchanged glass as a result of infrared laser irradiation. The research of current studies were published in the journal of Nanomaterials. (2020-09-29)

How to bounce back from stretched out stretchable sensors
Elastic can stretch too far and that could be problematic in wearable sensors. A team of researchers at Yokohama National University has proposed a fix to prevent too much stretching while improving the sensing ability of electronics. This could lead to advanced prosthetics or disaster recovery robotics. They published their results on July 29 in the Scientific Reports. (2020-09-24)

'Firefly' imaging method zooms in on 'the forces within us'
Scientists have developed a new technique using tools made of luminescent DNA, lit up like fireflies, to visualize the mechanical forces of cells at the molecular level. (2020-09-22)

Cosmic X-rays reveal an indubitable signature of black holes
A black hole is an exotic cosmic object, from within which nothing, not even light, can escape. Definitive proof of the existence of such objects is a holy grail of physics and astronomy. An international team of astrophysicists, consisting of Mr. Srimanta Banerjee, Professor Marat Gilfanov, Professor Sudip Bhattacharyya and Professor Rashid Sunyaev, has found by far the strongest steady signature of stellar-mass black holes to date, from the cosmic X-rays observed with a satellite. (2020-09-21)

Technique permits convenient, precise optical imaging of individual proteins
In a new study, Shaopeng Wang and his colleagues describe a method for examining proteins in keen detail. To do this, his group makes clever use of a phenomenon known as surface plasmon resonance (SPR), incorporating it into an innovative type of microscope. (2020-09-21)

Study finds novel mechanism that may confer protection against glaucoma
A team of researchers from LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence and the University of Copenhagen provides the first evidence that patients with ocular hypertension may exhibit superior antioxidant protection that promotes resistance to the elevated intraocular pressure associated with glaucoma. (2020-09-17)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.