Current Television News and Events

Current Television News and Events, Television News Articles.
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Stirling research evaluates effectiveness of conservation efforts
New research from the University of Stirling into the effectiveness of international conservation projects could help to save endangered species from extinction. (2020-11-23)

OHIO professor publishes first article that looks at concussion risk in stunt performers
Dr. Jeff Russell, associate professor of athletic training within the College of Health Sciences and Professions at Ohio University, is shining a light on a segment of concussion patients who often go unnoticed in comparison to athletes: performing artists. (2020-11-23)

Could your vacuum be listening to you?
A team of researchers demonstrated that popular robotic household vacuum cleaners can be remotely hacked to act as microphones. (2020-11-17)

When kids watch a lot of TV, parents may end up more stressed
The more TV kids watch, the more ads they see and the more likely they are to ask for things on shopping trips. That may contribute to parents' overall stress levels, researchers found. (2020-11-10)

How is STEM children's programming prioritizing diversity?
The first large-scale analysis of characters featured in STEM-related educational programming revealed that of the characters appearing in STEM television programming for kids ages 3 to 6, Latinx and females are left behind. (2020-10-16)

Television advertising limits can reduce childhood obesity, study concludes
Limiting the hours of television advertising for foods and beverages high in fat, sugar and salt (HFSS) could make a meaningful contribution to reducing childhood obesity, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Oliver Mytton of the University of Cambridge, UK, and colleagues. (2020-10-13)

New research determines if political "air war" or "ground game" is most effective
CATONSVILLE, MD, October 7, 2020 - New research has shed light on how various political campaign activities influence voters. It found that a candidate's mass media advertising is more likely to influence independent voters, while the campaign's ''ground game,'' targeting voters through grassroots outreach, is more effective at reaching a candidate's base. (2020-10-07)

Marketing study investigates impact of Viagra TV ads on birth rates
Marketing researchers found that an increase in advertising of erectile dysfunction drugs contributed to more total births in Massachusetts. (2020-10-01)

ASU study finds association between screen time use, diet and other health factors
In a study recently published in BMC Public Health, Arizona State University researchers found that heavy users of screens -- defined as those who use screens an average of 17.5 hours per day -- reported the least healthful dietary patterns and the poorest health-related characteristics compared with moderate and light users, who averaged roughly 11.3 and 7 hours of screen use per day, respectively. (2020-09-28)

Facebook political ads more partisan, less negative than TV
More political candidates may be shifting primarily to social media to advertise rather than TV, according to a study of advertising trends from the 2018 campaign season. The study also found that Facebook political ads were more partisan, less negative and less issue-focused than those on TV. (2020-09-14)

Netflix - a zebra among horses: QUT researcher
Netflix is often criticised as a Hollywood-style entertainment behemoth crushing all competition and diminishing local content, but an Australian-based academic says that's a simplistic view. Media studies expert Professor Amanda Lotz, from QUT's Digital Media Research Centre, said there is a lot of misunderstanding about the world's biggest internet-distributed video service which has proved a gamechanger for entertainment. (2020-09-10)

Suicide on screen: Getting the message right can support better mental health outcomes
In a new paper, University of South Australia researchers have confirmed that portrayals of suicide in moving-image fiction and non-fiction media, such as television and web series, films, and documentaries, has the potential to increase suicidal ideation and behaviour. (2020-09-08)

Airing commercials after political ads actually helps sell nonpolitical products
About $7 billion reportedly will be spent this fall on television and digital commercials from political campaigns and political action committees. Companies running ads immediately afterward have been concerned about the potential of a negative spillover effect on how they and their products and services are perceived. But new research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business finds that the opposite is true. Contrary to mainstream thought, political ads instead yield positive spillover effects for nonpolitical advertisers. (2020-08-18)

Journalists' Twitter use shows them talking within smaller bubbles
Journalists in Washington, D.C., have long been accused of living in a ''Beltway bubble.'' Their interactions on Twitter, however, show them congregating in even smaller ''microbubbles,'' says a recent study. The journalists within each communicate more among themselves than with journalists outside the group. That means Beltway journalism ''may be even more insular than previously thought,'' say study authors Nikki Usher and Yee Man Margaret Ng, journalism professors at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. (2020-08-05)

Study gauges how Kansans get information on COVID-19, which sources they trust
A researcher in KU's Center for Excellence in Health Communications to Underserved Populations surveyed Kansans over a 96-hour window to gauge where they got coronavirus info. He found they trusted the governor's briefing, local and national media most, while trusting social media the least. (2020-06-30)

Engaging in family meals starts with healthy family communication
Engaging in family meals may be a matter of improving communication and support at home. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, connects less family discouragement and better family communication with a higher likelihood to eat evening family meals and family breakfasts together, and not in front of a television. (2020-06-08)

Radio: The medium that is best dealing with the COVID-19 crisis
During lockdown, the Media Psychology Lab, directed by Emma Rodero, a lecturer with the UPF Department of Communication, has conducted a study on the listening habits, consumption, credibility and psychological impact of the radio in the COVID-19 crisis. Everything indicates that radio sets the bar quite high with its treatment of the crisis. (2020-05-19)

Screen time for babies linked to higher risk of autism-like symptoms later in childhood
Sitting a baby in front of a tablet or television, as well as less parent-child play time, are associated with developing greater autism spectrum disorder (ASD)-like symptoms later in childhood. These findings, from the first prospective study on the subject, are published today in JAMA Pediatrics from researchers at Drexel University's College of Medicine and Dornsife School of Public Health. (2020-04-20)

New UC Davis research suggests parents should limit screen media for preschoolers
New research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics this week says screen time for children should be limited. (2020-03-31)

CUNY New York City COVID-19 Survey week 2
Nearly three in ten New York City residents (29%) report that either they or someone in their household has lost their job as a result of coronavirus over the last two weeks. In addition, 80% of NYC residents said they experienced reduced ability to get the food they need, and two-thirds (66%) reported a loss of social connection in the past week, suggesting that compelled isolation is taking a toll on residents. (2020-03-24)

Newly found bacteria fights climate change, soil pollutants
Cornell University researchers have found a new species of soil bacteria that is particularly adept at breaking down organic matter, including the cancer-causing chemicals that are released when coal, gas, oil and refuse are burned. (2020-02-20)

Time spent watching television does not replace physical activity for Finnish men
A large proportion of highly active men watch more television than their low-active peers do. In contrast, highly active women watch less television than low-active women do. (2020-02-12)

Political TV ads referencing guns increased eightfold over four election cycles
The number of political candidate television advertisements that refer to guns increased significantly across four election cycles in US media markets, according to a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2020-02-03)

Lost in translation: Organic matter cuts plant-microbe links
Soil scientists from Cornell and Rice Universities have dug around and found that although adding carbon organic matter to agricultural fields is usually advantageous, it may muddle the beneficial underground communication between legume plants and microorganisms. (2020-01-30)

Wild tomatoes resist devastating bacterial canker
Many tomato growers are familiar with the scourge of bacterial canker - the wilted leaves and blistered fruit that can spoil an entire season's planting. For those whose livelihoods depend on tomatoes, this pathogen -- Clavibacter michiganensis -- is economically devastating. In a new paper, Cornell University researchers showed that wild tomato varieties are less affected by bacterial canker than traditionally cultivated varieties. (2020-01-27)

Kids twice as likely to eat healthy after watching cooking shows with healthy food
Television programs featuring healthy foods can be a key ingredient in leading children to make healthier food choices now and into adulthood. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, found kids who watched a child-oriented cooking show featuring healthy food were 2.7 times more likely to make a healthy food choice than those who watched a different episode of the same show featuring unhealthy food. (2020-01-03)

Here's what police know about digital evidence
In today's criminal justice system, a Play Station and iPhone are just as important pieces of evidence as eyewitness accounts. Thomas Holt, professor of criminal justice at Michigan State University, is among the first researchers to capture how well police officers recognize digital evidence, as well as what to do with it. (2019-12-12)

One-third of Americans use news sources they consider less reliable
One-third of Americans rely on news platforms they acknowledge are less reliable, mainly social media and peers. The other two-thirds of the public consider their primary news sources trustworthy, mainly print news and broadcast television, according to a new RAND Corporation report. (2019-12-10)

TV watching is the lifestyle habit most strongly associated with obesity in children
ISGlobal team studies the role of five different lifestyle habits in the development of childhood overweight and obesity (2019-12-10)

Impact of lifestyle behaviors in early childhood on obesity
Adhering to a healthy lifestyle at age 4 years is associated with a decreased risk of overweight, obesity, and abdominal obesity at 7 years, according to a study published in Pediatric Obesity. (2019-12-04)

High levels of screen use associated with symptoms of anxiety in adolescence
High levels of social media use, television viewing and computer use are associated with symptoms of anxiety in adolescence. (2019-11-26)

Metabolic discovery may help in fight against heart disease, diabetes
Researchers at Cornell University have uncovered a key step in how the human body metabolizes sugar, which could lead to better treatment and prevention of heart disease, obesity and Type 2 diabetes. (2019-10-02)

Is overall screen time associated with academic performance in kids, teens?
Screen time overall wasn't associated with the academic performance of children and adolescents in this observational study. Called a systematic review and meta-analysis, this research consisted of a review of 58 studies from 23 countries (involving 480,000 participants ages 4 to 18) and a meta-analysis that combined the results of 30 of those studies involving 106,000 participants. (2019-09-23)

Virtual reality experiences may help treat severe pain
Therapeutic virtual reality can be used to reduce severe pain in hospitalized patients, according to a study published August 14, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Brennan Spiegel of Cedars-Sinai Health System, USA, and colleagues. (2019-08-14)

Abundant screen time linked with overweight among children
A recently completed study indicates that Finnish children who spend a lot of time in front of screens have a heightened risk for overweight and abdominal obesity, regardless of the extent of their physical activity. (2019-08-09)

Increases in social media use and television viewing associated with increases in teen depression
A new study published in JAMA Pediatrics has revealed that social media use and television viewing are linked to increases in adolescent depressive symptoms. (2019-07-15)

Tweeting while watching TV diminishes enjoyment
The most significant impact of two-screen experience was on viewers' ability to 'transport' into the narrative and become immersed in the televised story. (2019-07-02)

Binge watching TV increases heart health risks more than a desk job among African Americans
Among African Americans, television watching proved more of a heart health threat than sitting at a desk job. African Americans who watched more than four hours of television every day faced a 50% greater risk of heart disease and premature death compared with those who watched less than two hours. However, African Americans who watched regular TV but also engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity 150 minutes per week did not face an increased risk for heart health problems. (2019-06-26)

Moral concerns override desire to profit from finding a lost wallet
The setup of a research study was a bit like the popular ABC television program 'What Would You Do?' -- minus the television cameras and big reveal in the end. (2019-06-20)

Moral lessons in children's television programs may require extra explanation
In two separate studies, researchers monitored more than 100 4-6-year-olds and found that they didn't understand messages about inclusiveness. (2019-06-20)

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