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Current Thermal conductivity News and Events

Current Thermal conductivity News and Events, Thermal conductivity News Articles.
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Nano bulb lights novel path
Rice University engineers have created what may be viewed as the world's smallest incandescent lightbulbs, collections of near-nanoscale materials called 'selective thermal emitters' that absorb heat and emit light. (2019-09-19)
UBC engineers create ways to keep stone waste out of landfills
Using polymers and natural stone slurry waste, UBC Okanagan researchers are manufacturing environmentally friendly stone composites. (2019-09-19)
Novel mechanism of electron scattering in graphene-like 2D materials
Suggesting an unconventional way to manipulate the properties of 2D materials in the presence of a Bose-Einstein condensate, and an alternative strategy to design high-temperature superconductors. (2019-09-17)
Army research looks at pearls for clues on enhancing lightweight armor for soldiers
By mimicking the outer coating of pearls (nacre, or as it's more commonly known, mother of pearl), researchers at University at Buffalo, funded by the Army Research Office (ARO), created a lightweight plastic that is 14 times stronger and eight times lighter (less dense) than steel and ideal for absorbing the impact of bullets and other projectiles. (2019-09-16)
Just add water
Chemists uncover a mechanism behind doping organic semiconductors (2019-09-16)
Paramagnetic spins take electrons for a ride, produce electricity from heat
Local thermal perturbations of spins in a solid can convert heat to energy even in a paramagnetic material -- where spins weren't thought to correlate long enough to do so. (2019-09-13)
Innovative model created for NASA to predict vitamin levels in spaceflight food
A team of food scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has developed a groundbreaking, user-friendly mathematical model for NASA to help ensure that astronauts' food remains rich in nutrients during extended missions in space. (2019-09-12)
Conductivity at the edges of graphene bilayers
For nanoribbons of bilayer graphene, whose edge atoms are arranged in zigzag patterns, the bands of electron energies which are allowed and forbidden are significantly different to those found in monolayer graphene. (2019-09-11)
Smithsonian scientists triple number of known electric eel species
South American rivers are home to at least three different species of electric eels, including a newly identified species capable of generating a greater electrical discharge than any other known animal, according to a new analysis of 107 fish collected in Brazil, French Guiana, Guyana and Suriname in recent years. (2019-09-10)
Future of portable electronics -- Novel organic semiconductor with exciting properties
Organic semiconductors have advantages over inorganic semiconductors in several areas. (2019-09-10)
Prehistoric AC
Tyrannosaurus rex, one of the largest meat-eating dinosaurs on the planet, had an air conditioner in its head, suggest scientists from the University of Missouri, Ohio University and University of Florida, while challenging over a century of previous beliefs. (2019-09-04)
Seeking moments of disorder
Scientists discover a new, long-hypothesized material state with a signature of quantum disordered liquid-like magnetic moments. (2019-09-04)
Revolutionizing water quality monitoring for our rivers and reef
New, lower-cost help may soon be on the way to help manage one of the biggest threats facing the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-09-03)
Novel approach leads to potential sepsis prevention in burn patients
Abdul Hamood, Ph.D., from the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine and his collaborative team investigated the feasibility of developing a topical treatment unrelated to conventional antibiotics that can be used to battle Pseudomonas aeruginosa. (2019-09-03)
Functional changes of thermosensory molecules related to environmental adaptation
Scientists from National Institute for Physiological Sciences and their collaborator in Japan have clarified the functional shift of thermal sensors among frog species adapted to different thermal niches and revealed the molecular basis for the shift in thermal perception related to environmental adaptation. (2019-09-02)
Researchers demonstrate first all-metamaterial optical gas sensor
At FiO + LS conference, researchers will discuss the first fully integrated, non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) gas sensor enabled by specially engineered synthetic materials known as metamaterials. (2019-08-29)
Hints of a volcanically active exomoon
A rocky extrasolar moon (exomoon) with bubbling lava may orbit a planet 550 light-years away from us. (2019-08-29)
Researchers reveal ultra-fast bomb detection method that could upgrade airport security
Researchers from the University of Surrey have revealed a new ultra-fast method to detect materials that could be used to build explosives. (2019-08-29)
Energy-efficient power electronics -- Gallium oxide power transistors with record values
The Ferdinand-Braun-Institut (FBH) has now achieved a breakthrough with transistors based on gallium oxide (beta-Ga2O3). (2019-08-27)
From crystals to glasses: a new unified theory for heat transport
Theoretical physicists from SISSA and the UCDavis lay brand new foundations to heat transport in materials, which finally allow crystals, polycrystalline solids, alloys, and glasses to be treated on the same solid footing. (2019-08-26)
New study reveals carbon nanotubes measurement possible for the first time
Swansea University scientists report an entirely new approach to manipulation of carbon nanotubes that allows physical measurements to be made on carbon nanotubes that have previously only been possible by theoretical computation. (2019-08-22)
Artificial muscles bloom, dance, and wave
Researchers from KAIST have developed an ultrathin, artificial muscle for soft robotics. (2019-08-21)
Doped photovoltaics
Organic solar cells are made of cheap and abundant materials, but their efficiency and stability still lag behind those of silicon-based solar cells. (2019-08-16)
Skoltech scientists found a way to create long-life fast-charging batteries
A group of researchers led by Skoltech Professor Pavel Troshin studied coordination polymers, a class of compounds with scarcely explored applications in metal-ion batteries, and demonstrated their possible future use in energy storage devices with a high charging/discharging rate and stability. (2019-08-15)
New 3D interconnection technology for future wearable bioelectronics
IBS scientists developed stretchable metal composites and 3D printed them on soft substrates at room temperature. (2019-08-14)
The first metal-organic coordination polymers were synthesized at the Samara Polytech
Fullerenes, metamaterials, composites and superconductors -- these are all the materials from which the world of the future will be created. (2019-08-13)
Despite temperature shifts, treehoppers manage to mate
A rare bright spot among dismal climate change predictions, new research findings show that some singing insects are likely to manage to reproduce even in the midst of potentially disruptive temperature changes. (2019-08-09)
A key piece to understanding how quantum gravity affects low-energy physics
In a new study, led by researchers from SISSA (Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati), the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Waterloo, a solid theoretical framework is provided to discuss modifications to the Unruh effect caused by the microstructure of space-time. (2019-08-08)
Brain stimulation for PTSD patients
University of Houston assistant professor of electrical engineering Rose T. (2019-08-07)
Ionic thermal up-diffusion boosts energy harvesting
Recently nanofluidic salinity gradient energy harvesting via ion channels or membranes has drawn increasing concerns due to the advances in materials science and nanotechnology, which exhibits much higher power density than the macro reverse electrodialysis systems, indicating its potential to harvest the huge amount blue energy released by mixing seawater and river water and enhance power extracted for osmotic heat engines. (2019-08-06)
Is it safe to use an electric fan for cooling?
The safety and effectiveness of electric fans in heatwaves depend on the climate and basing public health advice on common weather metrics could be misleading, according to a new study from the University of Sydney. (2019-08-05)
In the future, this electricity-free tech could help cool buildings in metropolitan areas
Engineers designed a new system to help cool buildings in crowded metropolitan areas without consuming electricity, an important innovation as cities work to adapt to climate change. (2019-08-05)
How roads can help cool sizzling cities
Special permeable concrete pavement can help reduce the 'urban heat island effect' that causes cities to sizzle in the summer, according to a Rutgers-led team of engineers. (2019-08-01)
Expanding functions of conducting microbial nanowires for chemical, biological sensors
In the latest paper from the Geobacter Lab led by microbiologist Derek Lovley at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, he and colleagues report 'a major advance' in the quest to develop electrically conductive protein nanowires in the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens for use as chemical and biological sensors. (2019-07-29)
KIST-Stanford team develops new material for wearable devices able to restore conductivity
Development of nanocomposite material simultaneously possessing high stretchability, high conductivity, and self-healability. (2019-07-24)
Is deadly Candida auris a product of global warming?
A drug-resistant fungus species called Candida auris, which was first identified 10 years ago and has since caused hundreds of deadly outbreaks in hospitals around the world, may have become a human pathogen in part due to global warming, according to three scientists led by a researcher at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2019-07-24)
Skoltech scientists developed a novel method to fine-tune the properties of carbon nanotubes
Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials (CPQM) have developed a novel method to fine-tune the optoelectrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) by applying an aerosolized dopant solution on their surface, thus opening up new avenues for SWCNT application in optoelectronics. (2019-07-24)
Rise of Candida auris blamed on global warming
Global warming may have played a pivotal role in the emergence of Candida auris, according to a new study published in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2019-07-23)
Search for new semiconductors heats up with gallium oxide
University of Illinois electrical engineers have cleared another hurdle in high-power semiconductor fabrication by adding the field's hottest material -- beta-gallium oxide -- to their arsenal. (2019-07-22)
Successful application of machine learning in the discovery of new polymers
As a powerful example of how artificial intelligence (AI) can accelerate the discovery of new materials, scientists in Japan have designed and verified polymers with high thermal conductivity -- a property that would be the key to heat management, for example, in the fifth-generation (5G) mobile communication technologies. (2019-07-19)
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