Current Toddlers News and Events

Current Toddlers News and Events, Toddlers News Articles.
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Study finds over 64% of people reported new health issues during 'work from home'
In a new study, researchers have found that working from home has negatively impacted our physical health and mental health, increased work expectations and distractions, reduced our communications with co-workers and ultimately lessened our productivity. The study finds that time spent at the workstation increased by approximately 1.5 hours. It also illustrates the differential impact of working from home for women, parents, and those with higher income (2020-12-03)

For toddlers with autism, more intervention hours are not necessarily better
Two prominent early intervention models for toddlers with autism show a very similar impact, whether delivered at 15-hours or 25-hours per week intensities, a UC Davis MIND Institute study has found. (2020-10-19)

Toddlers who use touchscreens show attention differences
New research from the TABLET project recruited 12-month-old infants who had different levels of touchscreen usage. (2020-08-19)

Early neural activity associated with autism
Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, have found evidence of signature brain activity in infants that predicted ASD symptoms later at 18 months old. The work, led by Shafali Jeste, MD, at UCLA appears in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, published by Elsevier. (2020-08-11)

Helicopter parents should step back and watch, study recommends
As part of her PhD at Edith Cowan University in Western Australia, Mandy Richardson conducted the world's first data-driven study of parenting classes based on the Respectful Approach intervention. The Respectful Approach, modelled on Resources for Infant Educators (RIE)TM, guides parents to treat young children as capable and independent humans who can flourish if given safe space and freedom from too much adult direction. (2020-07-30)

Dietary guidelines advisory committee reinforces need for increased choline intake
The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee published its Advisory Report to the Secretary of Agriculture and the Secretary of Health and Human Services. Among its findings, the Committee concluded that current choline intake levels are too low for most Americans and found low intake levels among infants and toddlers, as well as vulnerable populations like pregnant and lactating women, especially concerning. Choline is an essential nutrient that supports a variety of processes at all stages of life and throughout the body. (2020-07-20)

Insight into toddlers' awareness of their own uncertainty
Toddlers may not be able to describe their feelings of uncertainty, but a new study from the Center for Mind and Brain at UC Davis provides evidence that toddlers may experience and deal with uncertainty in decision making in the same way as older children and adults. (2020-07-20)

Do I look mad? Reading facial cues with the touch-screen generation
Are today's children, who grew up with mobile technology from birth, worse at reading emotions and picking up cues from people's faces than children who didn't grow up with tablets and smartphones? A new UCLA psychology study suggests today's kids are all right. (2020-05-07)

'Terrible twos' not inevitable: With engaged parenting, happy babies can become happy toddlers
Parents should not feel pressured to make their young children undertake structured learning or achieve specific tasks, particularly during lockdown. A new study of children under the age of two has found that parents who take a more flexible approach to their child's learning can - for children who were easy babies - minimise behavioural problems during toddlerhood. (2020-05-06)

Screen time for babies linked to higher risk of autism-like symptoms later in childhood
Sitting a baby in front of a tablet or television, as well as less parent-child play time, are associated with developing greater autism spectrum disorder (ASD)-like symptoms later in childhood. These findings, from the first prospective study on the subject, are published today in JAMA Pediatrics from researchers at Drexel University's College of Medicine and Dornsife School of Public Health. (2020-04-20)

Risk factors for carrying pneumonia-causing bacteria revealed
New research has uncovered the risk factors for Fijians carrying a pneumonia-causing bacteria. (2020-04-08)

New research finds infant cereal consumption is associated with improved nutrient intake
An investigation of infant feeding patterns found infants and toddlers consuming baby cereal, such as rice cereal, had higher intakes of key nutrients of concern, such as calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc and vitamin E. The study illustrates the importance of rice baby cereal in the diets of infants and toddlers in achieving proper nutrition. (2020-03-10)

Poor sleep in infancy linked to behavioral and emotional problems in toddlers
Disrupted and poor quality sleep in the earliest months of a child's life can be an indicator of depression, anxiety and behavioral problems among toddlers, according to a new study. (2020-03-10)

New study provides criteria for good infant sleep for the first time
According to a new study, sleep problems among infants are very common and normally improve by the time the child reaches the age of 2. (2020-02-05)

Association of parent, family stressors with screen exposure among toddlers
This population-based study explored associations between parent and family stressors, such as parenting stress and lower household income, with child screen exposure and screen use paired with feeding in toddlers. (2020-02-05)

Ad spending on toddler milks increased four-fold from 2006 to 2015
Formula companies quadrupled their advertising of toddler milk products over a ten- year period, contributing to a 2.6 times increase in the amount of toddler milk sold, according to a new paper published in Public Health Nutrition from researchers at the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at the University of Connecticut. This rapid increase in sales occurred despite recommendations from health and nutrition experts. (2020-02-04)

Kids rice snacks in Australia contain arsenic above EU guidelines: Study
Three out of four rice-based products tested have concentrations of arsenic that exceed the EU guideline for safe rice consumption for babies and toddlers. The research used European guidelines because Australia does not have safety standards specifically for children. (2020-01-21)

Infants integrate firsthand and social experiences to decide when and how to try
Persistence is important to learning and is related to success in school and emotional well-being. A new study of persistence from Arizona State University, the University of Washington and University of Toronto shows that 18-month-old infants made rational inferences about applying effort to problem solving. The infants dynamically integrated information from their own and others' experiences in deciding when and how to try. (2020-01-20)

Sleep linked to language skills in neurodevelopmental disorders
New research has discovered that Down's syndrome, Fragile X syndrome and Williams syndrome are all linked to sleep disruption in very young children, and that sleep plays a crucial role in the development of these children's language skills. (2020-01-16)

One-fourth of children with autism are undiagnosed
One-fourth of children under age 8 with autism spectrum disorder -- most of them black or Hispanic -- are not being diagnosed, which is critical for improving quality of life. (2020-01-09)

False negatives: Delayed Zika effects in babies who appeared normal at birth
Colombian infants exposed to Zika virus in the womb showed neurodevelopmental delays as toddlers, despite having 'normal' brain imaging and head circumference at birth, a finding that underscores the importance of long-term neurodevelopmental follow-up for Zika-exposed infants, according to a cohort study published online Jan. 6, 2020, in JAMA Pediatrics. (2020-01-06)

In some children with autism, 'social' and 'visual' neural circuits don't quite connect
Researchers combined eye gaze research with brain scans to discover that in a common subtype of autism, in which ASD toddlers prefer images of geometric shapes over those of children playing, brain areas responsible for vision and attention are not controlled by social brain networks, and so social stimuli are ignored. (2019-12-17)

Researchers compare nutritional value of infant and toddler foods
Infant and toddler foods sold in pouches have lower nutritional value than foods sold in jars and other packaging, according to a new study led by researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. The findings of the study are published in the current issue of the journal Nutrition Today. (2019-12-02)

Unhealthy habits can start young: Infants, toddlers, and added sugars
A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, found that nearly two-thirds of infants (61%) and almost all toddlers (98%) consumed added sugars in their average daily diets, primarily in the form of flavored yogurts (infants) and fruit drinks (toddlers). Infants were 6-11 months, and toddlers were 12-23 months. (2019-11-14)

Puberty may offer window to reset effects of early deprived care on stress-response system
The ability to recalibrate how children respond to stress could offer a way to promote resilience. (2019-11-13)

Late talkers twice as likely to have severe, frequent temper tantrums
Toddler speech delays and temper tantrums have long been assumed to be linked. Now, for the first time, a new, large-scale study supports that assumption with data. (2019-11-11)

Allergy shots may be an effective treatment for pediatric pollen food allergy syndrome
A new study being presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting in Houston shows allergy shots (subcutaneous immunotherapy) can be effective in reducing PFAS symptoms for pediatric patients. (2019-11-08)

Empowering pediatricians to reduce preventable firearm injuries and deaths
A Children's National Hospital emergency room physician will participate in a symposium of surgeons, neurosurgeons and emergency medicine doctors during the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference and Exhibition -- the first time these groups have come together to help reduce the number of kids hurt or killed by firearms. (2019-10-25)

Babies understand counting years earlier than believed
Babies who are years away from being able to say 'one,' 'two,' and 'three' actually already have a sense of what counting means, Johns Hopkins University researchers have discovered. The findings reveal that very early on, years earlier than previously believed, babies who hear counting realize that it's about quantity. (2019-10-24)

Ethnically diverse mothers, children living in poverty at risk for sleep problems
African-American and other ethnically diverse mothers know the value of a good night's sleep, but they and their young children are at risk for developing sleep problems if they live in urban poverty, a Rutgers study finds. (2019-10-09)

First large-scale study of universal screening for autism raises questions about accuracy
In the first large, real-world study of universal screening for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in toddlers, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found that the most widely used and researched screening tool is less accurate than shown in previous studies conducted in research laboratory settings. The new study also revealed significant disparities in detecting early autism symptoms in minority, urban and low-income children. (2019-09-27)

Head start programs alleviate supply gap of center-based childcare in NJ
The availability of Head Start and Early Head Start in New Jersey, federal programs designed to serve low-income families' childcare needs, reduces the likelihood that a community will experience a severe childcare supply gap, a Rutgers-led study found. (2019-08-26)

Intake of phosphates: Babies, infants and children can exceed the health guidance values
Phosphates are essential substances that occur naturally in the human body and make up a considerable portion of our nutrition. They occur in almost all foods, especially those high in protein, such as cheese, cold cuts and meat. A certain group of phosphates is authorised as food additives in the European Union. (2019-07-16)

How does playing with other children affect toddlers' language learning?
Toddlers are surprisingly good at processing the speech of other young children, according to a new study. And toddlers who have more exposure to other children, such as those in daycare, may be particularly good at certain word learning skills. (2019-07-10)

Motorized scooter head injuries on the rise, Rutgers study finds
Facial and head injuries from riding electric scooters have tripled over the past decade, according to a Rutgers study. (2019-06-11)

Reading with toddlers reduces harsh parenting, enhances child behavior
People who regularly read with their toddlers are less likely to engage in harsh parenting and the children are less likely to be hyperactive or disruptive, a Rutgers-led study finds. (2019-05-23)

What happens when your picky eater becomes a teenager?
Toddlers who are picky about their food are not deficient in essential nutrients compared to their peers when they are teenagers. (2019-05-14)

New study shows toddlers are great at getting the conversation started
Conversation is an important part of what makes us human. Previous research has shown that children begin to develop this skill at a young age. While many assume that mothers instigate communication with their children, new research suggests that children are the ones who get the conversation started. 'I was surprised that kids were drivers of conversation,' said Mark VanDam, who will present his team's research findings at the 177th ASA Meeting, May 13-17, 2019. (2019-05-14)

Want to expand your toddler's vocabulary? Find another child
Children glean all kinds of information from the people around them. In particular, children mimic and learn speech patterns from their family. Previous work has shown that infants attend selectively to their mother's voice over another female's voice. But new research suggests that children learn new words best from other children. Yuanyuan Wang will present research findings from a collaborative work with Amanda Seidl from Purdue University at the 177th ASA Meeting, May 13-17, 2019. (2019-05-13)

Autism diagnoses prove highly stable as early as 14 months
Diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by trained professionals in children as young as 14 months are remarkably stable, suggesting that accurate screening and earlier treatment is feasible, report scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine. (2019-04-29)

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