Current Tongue News and Events

Current Tongue News and Events, Tongue News Articles.
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Prehistoric shark hid its largest teeth
Some, if not all, early sharks that lived 300 to 400 million years ago not only dropped their lower jaws downward but rotated them outwards when opening their mouths. This enabled them to make the best of their largest, sharpest and inward-facing teeth when catching prey, paleontologists at the Universities of Zurich and Chicago have now shown using CT scanning and 3D printing. (2020-11-18)

Extremely rare parasitic crustacean discovered in museum shark collection
Scientists have discovered an extremely rare species of cymothoid from the mouth of a museum specimen of a deep-sea shark caught from the East China Sea, suggesting its wide distribution around the globe. (2020-11-17)

Children misdiagnosed with "impairment of language acquisition"
Around 45% of children in Austrian day nurseries have a first language other than German. Those who our experiencing difficulty in learning the second language are often diagnosed as having a suspected ''impairment of language acquisition''. In fact, this often merely reflects the fact that they have not yet fully acquired the second language. (2020-11-16)

Silicone surface mimics topology, wettability of a real human tongue
The tongue helps people taste food, but structures on its surface also help them sense textures -- something that's also very important when savoring a meal. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have made a 3D silicone surface that, for the first time, closely mimics the surface features of the human tongue. The material could help food scientists study mechanical interactions of foods, liquids and medicines with the organ. (2020-11-11)

RUDN University linguists: Vocabulary size affects ability to differentiate foreign language vowels
A team of linguists from RUDN University established that a person's ability to accurately differentiate between vowel sounds of a foreign language correlates with the size of their vocabulary in said language. (2020-11-10)

Earliest example of a rapid-fire tongue found in 'weird and wonderful' extinct amphibians
Fossils of bizarre, armored amphibians known as albanerpetontids provide the oldest evidence of a slingshot-style tongue, a new Science study shows. (2020-11-05)

A species identified in 2016 as an ancient form of chameleon was misidentified at that time, say researchers
A species identified in 2016 as an ancient form of chameleon was misidentified at that time, say researchers, many of whom were part of the original 2016 report. (2020-11-05)

3D printing the first ever biomimetic tongue surface
Scientists have created synthetic soft surfaces with tongue-like textures for the first time using 3D printing, opening new possibilities for testing oral processing properties of food, nutritional technologies, pharmaceutics and dry mouth therapies. (2020-10-26)

New research could help millions who suffer from 'ringing in the ears'
In the largest clinical trial of its kind, researchers show that combining sound and electrical stimulation of the tongue can significantly reduce tinnitus, commonly described as 'ringing in the ears.' They also found that therapeutic effects can be sustained for up to 12 months post-treatment. (2020-10-15)

Sensory device stimulates ears and tongue to treat tinnitus in large trial
A device that stimulates the ears and tongue substantially reduced the severity of tinnitus symptoms in 326 patients for as long as 1 year, while achieving high patient satisfaction and adherence. (2020-10-07)

Wasp egg-laying organ inspires new tool to reduce trauma in minimally invasive surgery
A new surgery tool based on the egg-laying organ of parasitic wasps could advance minimally invasive surgery by enabling tissue removal in deeper areas of the body while further minimising trauma and patient recovery time. Researchers at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands based their prototype on the ovipositor of wasps, an ultra-thin flexible organ, which uses friction forces generated by sliding internal blades to achieve efficient transport on a small scale. (2020-09-30)

Ancient Adélie penguin colony revealed by snowmelt at Cape Irizar, Ross Sea, Antarctica
Researcher Steven Emslie encountered a puzzle at Cape Irizar, a rocky cape located just south of the Drygalski Ice Tongue on the Scott Coast, Ross Sea. He found both ancient and what appeared to be fresh remains of Adelie penguins, mostly of chicks, which frequently die and accumulate at these colonies. However, the ''fresh'' remains were puzzling, he says, because there are no records of an active penguin colony at this site. (2020-09-28)

Relief for people who struggle with CPAP masks
A trial of a simple yet effective surgery has led Australian experts to promote it as an option to specialists around the world for managing difficult obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) cases. After rigorous evaluation of the surgery, excellent outcomes were shown in sleep apnea patients who had been unable to use continuous positive pressure airway (CPAP) treatment, with patients achieved relief from snoring and disrupted sleep and experienced improved general health. according to a new report in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). (2020-09-04)

Misfiring brain cells may cause swallowing woes in children with developmental disorders
Misfiring brain cells that control key parts of the mouth and tongue may be creating swallowing difficulties in children with neurodevelopmental disorders, according to neuroscientists with Virginia Tech and George Washington University. Problems ingesting, chewing, or swallowing food occur in up to 80 percent of children with developmental disorders and can lead to food aspiration, choking, or life-threatening respiratory infections. (2020-09-01)

Japanese expedition identifies East Antarctic melting hotspot
Ice is melting at a surprisingly fast rate underneath Shirase Glacier Tongue in East Antarctica due to the continuing influx of warm seawater into the Lützow-Holm Bay. (2020-08-24)

COVID-19 does not directly damage taste bud cells
A new study from the Regenerative Bioscience Center at the University of Georgia is the first to suggest that COVID-19 does not directly damage taste bud cells. (2020-08-10)

Taste bud cells might not be a target of SARS-CoV-2
An intriguing early symptom among some COVID-19 patients is the loss of the sense of smell and/or taste, which has led to the suspicion that the virus that causes the illness, SARS-CoV-2, could be targeting taste buds. But as researchers report in ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science, initial data from mice suggest that might not be the case.  (2020-08-05)

Specialized cellular compartments discovered in bacteria
Researchers at McGill University have discovered bacterial organelles involved in gene expression, suggesting that bacteria may not be as simple as once thought. This finding could offer new targets for the development of new antibiotics. (2020-07-20)

AI model to forecast complicated large-scale tropical instability waves in Pacific Ocean
Prof. LI Xiaofeng from the Institute of Oceanology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (IOCAS) and his collaborators from Ministry of Natural Resources and Shanghai Ocean University studied this type of complex oceanic phenomena through artificial intelligence (AI) technologies. (2020-07-15)

Sodium found to regulate the biological clock of mice
A new study from McGill University shows that increases in the concentrations of blood sodium can have an influence on the biological clock of mice, opening new research avenues for potentially treating the negative effects associated with long distance travel or shift work. (2020-07-09)

What happens when food first touches your tongue
A new study might explain why humans register some tastes more quickly than others, potentially due to each flavor's molecular size. The research also provided explanation as to why humans register taste more quickly when food or drink moves over their tongues quickly, as compared to when they are held in their mouth steadily. (2020-07-09)

Tongue microbes provide window to heart health
Microorganisms on the tongue could help diagnose heart failure, according to research presented today on HFA Discoveries, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). 'The tongues of patients with chronic heart failure look totally different to those of healthy people,' said study author Dr. Tianhui Yuan, No.1 Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine. (2020-06-23)

Altered sense of taste present in half of COVID-19 cases
A systematic review of COVID-19 cases finds nearly half of patients reported changes to or complete loss of their sense of taste. The finding furthers the evidence that changes in taste are a valid screening tool for COVID-19. (2020-05-27)

Enhancement of bitter taste sensor reduces salt intake and improves cardiovascular dysfunction
Researchers from China for the first time found long-term high salt intake blunted the TRPM5-mediated aversive behavior to high salt concentrations, consequently promoting high salt intake and hypertension. Moreover, they also found that activation of TRPM5 by bitter melon extract ameliorates high salt-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. (2020-05-15)

World-first saliva test detects hidden throat cancer
A series of saliva HPV tests detected an asymptomatic throat cancer during a trial of a new saliva diagnostic. Further validation studies are needed to confirm this finding. It is a world-first discovery, previously there was no screening test for HPV-DNA oropharyngeal cancers. The patient had surgery in which a 2 mm cancer was removed and has had no recurrence of HPV-DNA in his saliva. (2020-05-11)

An artificial 'tongue' of gold to taste maple syrup
A chemistry professor at Université de Montréal has developed a new test using gold nanoparticles to establish the flavour profile of maple syrup and help producers evaluate its quality. (2020-05-05)

Glacier detachments: A new hazard in a warming world?
On the evening of 5 August 2013, a startling event occurred deep in the remote interior of the United States' largest national park. A half-kilometer-long tongue of Alaska's Flat Creek glacier suddenly broke off, unleashing a torrent of ice and rock that rushed 11 kilometers down a rugged mountain valley into the wilderness encompassed by Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. (2020-04-28)

With a heavy heart: How men and women develop heart disease differently
A new study by researchers from McGill University has uncovered that minerals causing aortic heart valve blockage in men and women are different, a discovery that could change how heart disease is diagnosed and treated. (2020-04-24)

How does sugar drive consumption? Scientists discover gut-brain sugar sensor in mice
Artificial sweeteners have never fully succeeded in impersonating sugar. Now, a Columbia study in mice has identified a brain mechanism that may explain why. (2020-04-15)

Sweet as: The science of how diet can change the way sugar tastes
Researchers at the University of Sydney have discovered the basic science of how sweet taste perception is fine-tuned in response to different diets. While it has long been known that food can taste different based on previous experience, until now we didn't know the molecular pathways that controlled this effect. (2020-04-09)

The YAP signal plays a crucial role in head-and-neck cancer onset
Joint research between Kobe University and National Hospital Organization Kyushu Cancer Center has revealed that mice with mutations in the YAP signal pathway develop head-and-neck cancer over an extremely short period of time (world's fastest cancer onset mouse model), indicating that this pathway plays a crucial role in the onset of these cancers. This discovery may shed light on the development of new drugs for head-and-neck cancer. (2020-03-25)

Images reveal how bacteria form communities on the human tongue
Using a recently developed fluorescent imaging technique, researchers in the United States have developed high-resolution maps of microbial communities on the human tongue. The images, presented March 24 in the journal Cell Reports, reveal that microbial biofilms on the surface of the tongue have a complex, highly structured spatial organization. (2020-03-24)

East Antarctica's Denman Glacier has retreated almost 3 miles over last 22 years
East Antarctica's Denman Glacier has retreated 5 kilometers, nearly 3 miles, in the past 22 years, and researchers at the University of California, Irvine and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory are concerned that the shape of the ground surface beneath the ice sheet could make it even more susceptible to climate-driven collapse. (2020-03-23)

At 8 months, babies already know their grammar
Even before uttering their first words, babies master the grammar basics of their mother tongue. Thus eight-month-old French infants can distinguish function words, or functors -- e.g. articles (the), personal pronouns (she), or prepositions (on) -- from content words -- e.g. nouns (rainbow), verbs (to drive), or adjectives (green), according to researchers from the Integrative Neuroscience and Cognition Center (CNRS/Université de Paris). (2020-03-12)

How waves of 'clutches' in the motor cortex help our brains initiate movement
University of Chicago scientists have discovered that signals in the motor cortex act like a series of clutches when it comes to moving, and that these signals can be disrupted to slow the brain's initiation of movement. (2020-03-06)

It's what's inside that matters: Locking up proteins enables cancer metastasis
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) found that internalizing claudin-1 enables cancer cells to increase cell motility and to metastasize to lymph nodes. These findings could be exploited to develop novel therapies for cancer metastasis. (2020-03-03)

New technology helps reduce salt, keep flavor
A new processing technology out of Washington State University called microwave assisted thermal sterilization (MATS) could make it possible to reduce sodium while maintaining safety and tastiness. (2020-03-03)

Adaptation: Competition and predation may not be the driving force scientists thought
Species adapt to their local climates, but how often they adapt to their local communities remains a mystery. To find answers, researchers at McGill University and the University of British Columbia examined over 125 studies testing local adaptation in over 100 species of plants and animals in an article published in The American Naturalist. (2020-02-25)

Boys with inattention-hyperactivity face increased risk for traumatic brain injuries
McGill-led research shows that boys exhibiting inattention-hyperactivity at age 10 have a higher risk for traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in adolescence and adulthood. Treatments to reduce these behaviours may decrease the risk for TBIs. (2020-02-19)

Foot-and-mouth-disease virus could help target the deadliest cancer
The foot-and-mouth-disease virus is helping scientists to tackle a common cancer with the worst survival rate -- pancreatic cancer. (2020-02-11)

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