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Transcription factors may inadvertently lock in DNA mistakes
A team of Duke researchers has found that transcription factors have a tendency to bind strongly to ''mismatched'' sections of DNA, i.e. sections of the genome that were not copied correctly. (2020-10-21)
Targeting the shell of the Ebola virus
As the world grapples with COVID-19, the Ebola virus is again raging. (2020-10-20)
Terahertz zaps alter gene activity in stem cells
Terahertz light pulses change gene expression in stem cells, report researchers from Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) and Tokai University in Japan in the journal Optics Letters. (2020-10-08)
Mammals share gene pathways that allow zebrafish to grow new eyes
Working with fish, birds and mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that some animals' natural capacity to regrow neurons is not missing, but is instead inactivated in mammals. (2020-10-07)
Scientists map genes controlling immune system 'brakes'
Researchers at Gladstone Institutes, in collaboration with scientists at UC San Francisco (UCSF) and the Technical University of Munich (TUM), have mapped out the networks of genes that help differentiate regulatory T cells from other T cells. (2020-10-01)
Latent lineage potential in neural stem cells enables spinal cord repair in mice
Spinal stem cells in mice can be reprogrammed to generate protective oligodendrocytes after spinal cord injury, enhancing neural repair, according to a new study. (2020-10-01)
MAX binding with the variant Rs72780850 in RNA helicase DDX1 for susceptibility to neuroblastoma
The researchers adopted the functional polymorphism research strategy to screen out the functional polymorphisms associated with neuroblastoma in Chinese population and elucidate its mechanism, providing data on children susceptible to neuroblastoma in China. (2020-09-11)
"Jumping" DNA regulates human neurons
''Jumping'' sequences of DNA, known as transposable elements, partner up with evolutionarily recent proteins to influence the differentiation and physiological functioning of human neurons. (2020-08-28)
Researchers validate rapid tests to detect dengue, Zika, yellow fever and other viruses
The method identifies and distinguishes between flaviviruses that cause many diseases in humans and animals in Brazil. (2020-08-21)
Unlocking the cell enhances student learning of the genetic code
An open-source educational biotechnology called the 'Genetic Code Kit' allows students to interact with the molecular process inside cells in new ways. (2020-08-19)
A quick, cost-effective method to track the spread of COVID-19
A group of researchers have demonstrated that, from seven methods commonly used to test for viruses in untreated wastewater, an adsorption-extraction technique can most efficiently detect SARS-CoV-2. (2020-08-12)
Sugar-based signature identifies T cells where HIV hides despite antiretroviral therapy
Wistar scientists may have discovered a new way of identifying and targeting hidden HIV viral reservoirs during treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART). (2020-08-07)
Scientists discover new concept of bacterial gene regulation
Microbiologist Prof. Kai Papenfort and his team at Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) discovered a new mechanism of autoregulation during gene expression that relies on small regulatory ribonucleic acids (sRNAs) and the major endoribonuclease RNase E. (2020-08-06)
Four-stranded DNA structures found to play role in breast cancer
Four stranded DNA structures - known as G-quadruplexes - have been shown to play a role in certain types of breast cancer for the first time, providing a potential new target for personalised medicine, say scientists at the University of Cambridge. (2020-08-03)
HudsonAlpha scientists help identify important parts of the human genome
During the third phase, ENCODE consortium researchers drew closer to their goal of developing a comprehensive map of the functional elements of human and mouse genomes by adding to the ENCODE database millions of candidate DNA switches that regulate when and where genes are turned on. (2020-07-31)
Alternative amplification technique could speed up SARS-CoV-2 testing
An alternative amplification technique to detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA could offer a way to rapidly test large numbers of people for COVID-19, although the technique is not as sensitive as quantitative RT-PCR, the current standard method for COVID-19 testing. (2020-07-27)
Gene-controlling mechanisms play key role in cancer progression
MIT researchers have analyzed how epigenomic modifications change as tumors evolve. (2020-07-23)
How the regulator is regulated -- Insight into immune-related protein holds therapeutic value
Various proteins expressed in cells of the immune system have shown to play an important role in various disorders, including cancer, allergy, and autoimmune disease. (2020-07-21)
Specialized cellular compartments discovered in bacteria
Researchers at McGill University have discovered bacterial organelles involved in gene expression, suggesting that bacteria may not be as simple as once thought. (2020-07-20)
Molecular "tails" are secret ingredient for gene activation
Researchers in the lab of Caltech's Paul Sternberg discover how diverse forms of life are able to use the same cellular machinery for DNA transcription. (2020-07-14)
A simpler way to make sensory hearing cells
Scientists from the USC Stem Cell laboratories of Neil Segil and Justin Ichida are whispering the secrets of a simpler way to generate the sensory cells of the inner ear. (2020-07-01)
Breaking the silence: scientists investigate epigenetic impact across whole genome
Researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have uncovered a clue to the mystery of how epigenetic regulation impacts the entire plant genome, by looking at how plant cells suppress transcription - the first stage of how genes manufacture their products. (2020-06-30)
A vital game of hide-and-seek elucidated by novel single-molecule microscopy
Life depends on an intricate game of hide-and-seek taking place inside the cell. (2020-06-24)
Virtually screening antiviral compounds against SARS-CoV-2 structure may speed up drug and vaccine D
Virtually screening antiviral compounds to model their interactions with the SARS-CoV-2 virus may enable scientists to more easily identify antiviral drugs that work against the virus while informing the search for viable vaccine candidates, according to a new study. (2020-06-24)
Researchers have found a molecular explanation to a longstanding enigma in viral oncology
The oncogenic herpesvirus (HHV8 or KSHV) causes a cancer known as Kaposi's Sarcoma. (2020-06-09)
Down to the bone: Understanding how bone-dissolving cells are generated
Bone-dissolving cells called osteoclasts are derived from a type of immune cells called macrophages. (2020-06-09)
New treatment target verification for myelodysplastic syndrome
A Japanese research group analyzed the pathophysiology of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a blood cancer that presents often in the elderly, and found the presence of transcription factor RUNX3, thereby revealing a cancer growth function for what had been considered be a tumor suppressor. (2020-06-08)
Intestinal health: Dresden research team identifies enzyme essential for stem cell survival
Which pathways govern intestinal epithelial differentiation under constitutive conditions? Epithelial differentiation is largely controlled by the tissue-specific activity of transcription factors. (2020-06-08)
New role assigned to a human protein in transcription and genome stability
DNA-RNA hybrids, or R loops, are structures that generate genomic instability, a common feature of tumor cells. (2020-06-04)
'Terminator' protein halts cancer-causing cellular processes
New research from the lab of Hening Lin, professor of chemistry and chemical biology in the College of Arts and Sciences, finds that a protein called TiPARP acts as a terminator for several cancer-causing transcription factors, including HIF-1, which is implicated in many cancers, including breast cancer. (2020-06-03)
CNIC researchers discover a system essential for limb formation during embryonic development
Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have identified a system that tells embryonic cells where they are in a developing organ (2020-06-03)
Discovery in human acute myeloid leukemia could provide novel pathway to new treatments
Researchers at Mount Sinai have discovered that human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) stem cells are dependent on a transcription factor known as RUNX1, potentially providing a new therapeutic target to achieve lasting remissions or even cures for a disease in which medical advances have been limited. (2020-06-02)
FloChiP, a new tool optimizing gene-regulation studies
EPFL scientists have developed FloChip, a new microfluidic take on the widely used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technique. (2020-06-01)
Pregnancy reprograms breast cells, reducing cancer risk
Women who are pregnant before the age of 25 have a decreased risk of breast cancer throughout their lives. (2020-05-27)
Why pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is so lethal
Pancreatic ductal carcinoma is a fast growing and invasive cancer, and now scientists understand the molecular dance that makes it so deadly. (2020-05-19)
How to boost plant biomass: Biologists uncover molecular link between nutrient availability, growth
In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), plant genomic scientists at New York University's Center for Genomics & Systems Biology discovered the missing piece in the molecular link between a plant's perception of the nitrogen dose in its environment and the dose-responsive changes in its biomass. (2020-05-11)
Eliminating damaged germline cells preserves germline integrity
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba discovered that the transcription factor Myc plays a central role in the elimination of damaged germline cells. (2020-05-07)
Scientists edge closer to treatment for myotonic dystrophy
Scientists at the University of Nottingham have taken a step closer towards developing a treatment for the long-term genetic disorder, myotonic dystrophy. (2020-04-29)
Foot feathering in domesticated breeds of pigeons and chickens use same gene regulatory networks
Lead researcher Leif Andersson has investigated the genetic basis of foot feathering. (2020-04-28)
New test for COVID-19 may deliver faster results to more people
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in over 2.5 million confirmed cases worldwide and nearly over 170,000 deaths as of April 21 according to the World Health Organization1. (2020-04-23)
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