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Current Tree species News and Events

Current Tree species News and Events, Tree species News Articles.
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Turkestan cockroach selling online is a companion of the common household cockroach
The Turkestan cockroach (commonly known as the red runner roach or rusty red roach), which is popular as food for pet reptiles, has an interneuron extremely sensitive to sex pheromones emitted by American cockroaches, providing evidence that the Turkestan cockroach is phylogenetically close to the American cockroach and the smoky brown cockroach belonging to the genus Periplaneta. (2019-07-19)
Species on the move
A total of 55 animal species in the UK have been displaced from their natural ranges or enabled to arrive for the first time on UK shores because of climate change over the last 10 years (2008-2018) -- as revealed in a new study published today by scientists at international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London). (2019-07-18)
New species of flying squirrel from Southwest China added to the rarest and 'most wanted'
Described in 1981, the genus Biswamoyopterus is regarded as the most mysterious and rarest amongst all flying squirrels. (2019-07-18)
Tornadoes, windstorms pave way for lasting plant invasions
When tornadoes touch down, we brace for news of property damage, injuries, and loss of life, but the high-speed wind storms wreak environmental havoc, too. (2019-07-18)
UCF team discovers, names new frog species
An international team of researchers have identified and described two new frog species and have named one of them after a University of Central Florida professor. (2019-07-18)
Early mammal fossil reveals the evolutionary origins of having a loose tongue
Our highly mobile mammalian tongues, which allow us to swallow chewed food and suckle milk as babies, may have evolutionary origins in some of our most early mammalioform ancestors, according to a new study, which finds remarkably complex and modern mammal-like hyoid bones in a newly discovered 165-million-year-old mammaliaform species. (2019-07-18)
How sex affects gene expression in mammals
Researchers report the discovery of genome-wide variations in gene expression between mammalian females and males and offer new insights into the molecular origins and evolution of sexual dimorphism in mammal species, according to a new study. (2019-07-18)
Study reveals unusually high carbon stocks and tree diversity in Panama's Darien forest
Through a participatory forest-carbon monitoring project in the Darien forest of Panama, scientists and a team of trained indigenous technicians found that, even in disturbed areas, it maintained the same tree species richness and a disproportionately high capacity to sequester carbon. (2019-07-18)
Predators' fear of humans ripples through wildlife communities, emboldening rodents
Giving credence to the saying, 'While the cat's away, the mice will play,' a new study indicates that pumas and medium-sized carnivores lie low when they sense the presence of humans, which frees up the landscape for rodents to forage more brazenly. (2019-07-17)
The loss of biodiversity comes at a price
A University of Cordoba research team ran the numbers on the impact of forest fires on emblematic species using the fires in Spain's Doñana National Park and Segura mountains in 2017 as examples (2019-07-17)
New study works with historically disenfranchised communities to combat sudden oak death
Science often reflects the priorities of dominant industries and ignores the needs of disenfranchised communities, resulting in the perpetuation of historical injustices. (2019-07-17)
How puffins catch food outside the breeding season
Little is known about how seabirds catch their food outside the breeding season but using modern technology, researchers at the University of Liverpool and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology have gained new insight into their feeding habits. (2019-07-17)
Pokémon-like card game can help teach ecology: UBC research
Playing a Pokémon-like card game about ecology and biodiversity can result in broader knowledge of species and a better understanding of ecosystems than traditional teaching methods, like slideshows, according to new research from the University of British Columbia. (2019-07-17)
Joshua trees facing extinction
They outlived mammoths and saber-toothed tigers. But without dramatic action to reduce climate change, new research shows Joshua trees won't survive much past this century. (2019-07-16)
New species of tree discovered in Tanzania mountains
Researchers have discovered a new species of tree in the Usambara Mountains in Tanzania, part of the Eastern Arc Mountains, and a globally important region for species in need of conservation. (2019-07-16)
Salt regulation among saltmarsh sparrows evolved in 4 unique ways
A new study in Evolution Letters finds that different bird species in the same challenging environment -- the highly saline ecosystem of tidal marshes along ocean shores -- were able to evolve unique species-specific ways to address the same problem. (2019-07-16)
Timing is everything for the mutualistic relationship between ants and acacias
Ant-acacia plants attract ants by offering specialized food and hollow thorns in which the ants live, while the ant colony in turn defends its acacia against herbivores. (2019-07-16)
Invasive parrots have varying impacts on European biodiversity, citizens and economy
Non-native parrots can cause substantial agricultural damage and threaten native biodiversity. (2019-07-15)
More farmers, more problems: How smallholder agriculture is threatening the western Amazon
Small-scale farmers are posing serious threats to biodiversity in northeastern Peru -- and the problem will likely only get worse. (2019-07-15)
World's island conifers threatened with extinction from climate change
By estimating climate conditions in which conifer species could thrive if they needed to, a new study identifies which species are at extinction risk due to climate change. (2019-07-15)
Hear them roar: How humans and chickadees understand each other
Is there something universal about the sounds we make that allows vocal learners -- like songbirds -- to figure out how we're feeling? (2019-07-12)
Bird with unusually long toes found fossilized in amber
Meet the ancient bird that had toes longer than its lower legs. (2019-07-11)
DNA analysis reveals cryptic underwater ecosystem engineers
They look like smears of pink bubblegum on the rocks off British Columbia's coast, indistinguishable from one another. (2019-07-11)
Decades-long butterfly study shows common species on the decline
The most extensive and systematic insect monitoring program ever undertaken in North America shows that butterfly abundance in Ohio declined yearly by 2%, resulting in an overall 33% drop for the 21 years of the program. (2019-07-09)
Coral reefs shifting away from equator
Coral reefs are retreating from equatorial waters and establishing new reefs in more temperate regions, according to new research in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series. (2019-07-09)
Bacteria associated with hospital infections are found in raw meat
Bacteria of the Acinetobacter ACB complex, which are frequently acquired in hospital settings, can also be found in beef meat, according to a study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa' and performed with meat samples from markets in Lima, Peru. (2019-07-08)
Portland State study shows ways to reduce extreme heat in city neighborhoods
Planting more vegetation, using reflective materials on hard surfaces and installing green roofs on buildings can help cool potentially deadly urban heat islands -- a phenomenon that exists in nearly all large cities -- a new study from Portland State University shows. (2019-07-08)
CNIO researchers discover that the rate of telomere shortening predicts species lifespan
Comparison of telomeres of goats, dolphins, gulls, reindeer, vultures, flamingos, elephants, mice and humans reveals that species whose telomeres shorten faster have shorter lives. (2019-07-08)
Tracing the roots: Mapping a vegetable family tree for better food
In the new study, a team of multi-institution scientists led by the University of Missouri challenged prior theories of the origins of three vegetables -- canola, rutabaga and Siberian kale -- by mapping the genetic family tree of these leafy greens. (2019-07-08)
UBC scientists find high mutation rates within huge, old-growth trees
UBC scientists found the first evidence of the tremendous genetic variation that can accumulate in some of our tallest trees. (2019-07-08)
The global tree restoration potential
Restoration of the Earth's forests is the world's most effective solution to climate change available today and has the potential to capture two thirds of man-made carbon emissions, finds landmark research by the Crowther Lab, published today in the journal Science. (2019-07-04)
Area for restoring trees far greater than imagined and 'best climate change solution available'
In the first study to quantify how many trees the Earth can support, where, and how much carbon they could store, researchers report that Earth could support enough additional trees to cut carbon levels in the atmosphere by nearly 25% -- levels not seen for almost a century. (2019-07-04)
How trees could save the climate
Around 0.9 billion hectares of land worldwide would be suitable for reforestation, which could ultimately capture two thirds of human-made carbon emissions. (2019-07-04)
Hundreds of sharks and rays tangled in plastic
Hundreds of sharks and rays have become tangled in plastic waste in the world's oceans, new research shows. (2019-07-04)
Two new species of parasitic wasps described from an altitude of over 3,400 m in Tibet
Specimens kept in the collection of the Institute of Beneficial Insects at the Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University (China) revealed the existence of two previously unknown species of endoparasitic wasps. (2019-07-03)
Physicists develop model that describes length growth in biological systems
One of science's unsolved puzzles is that concerning the growth of biological systems. (2019-07-03)
11% of destroyed moist tropical forests could be restored to boost climate, environment
Researchers identified more than 100 million hectares of lost lowland tropical rain forests -- restoration hotspots -- spread out across Central and South America, Africa and Southeast Asia that present the most compelling opportunities for restoration to overcome rising global temperatures, water pollution and shortages, and the extinction of plant and animal life. (2019-07-03)
Is wildfire management 'for the birds?'
Spotted owl populations are in decline all along the West Coast, and as climate change increases the risk of large and destructive wildfires in the region, these iconic animals face the real threat of losing even more of their forest habitat. (2019-07-02)
Old-growth forest may provide valuable biodiversity refuge in areas at risk of severe fire
New findings show that old-growth forests, a critical nesting habitat for threatened northern spotted owls, are less likely to experience high-severity fire than young-growth forests during wildfires. (2019-07-02)
Corals in Singapore likely to survive sea-level rise: NUS study
Marine scientists from the National University of Singapore found that coral species in Singapore's sedimented and turbid waters are unlikely to be impacted by accelerating sea-level rise (2019-07-01)
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