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Current Tree species News and Events, Tree species News Articles.
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New species of seaweed uncovered by genetic analyses
Genetic analyses have revealed remarkably higher species diversity in common red seaweed than previously assumed. (2019-11-19)
Researchers find striking variation in mechanisms that drive sex selection in frogs
Researchers from McMaster University have discovered striking variation in the underlying genetic machinery that orchestrates sexual differentiation in frogs, demonstrating that evolution of this crucial biological system has moved at a dramatic pace. (2019-11-19)
Unlikely wasp enemy of a serious alien pest in North America named Idris elba
Idris is a worldwide genus of microscopic, parasitic wasps. A new species of Idris from Mexico (Guanajuato) and the United States (California, New Mexico) proved to be an unlikely enemy of the invasive bagrada bug, a major pest of various crops, including cruciferous vegetables. (2019-11-18)
The global distribution of freshwater plants is controlled by catchment characteristics
Unlike land plants, photosynthesis in many aquatic plants relies on bicarbonate in addition to CO2 to compensate for the low availability of CO2 in water. (2019-11-15)
Genes borrowed from bacteria allowed plants to move to land
Natural genetic engineering allowed plants to move from water to land, according to a new study by an international group of scientists from Canada, China, France, Germany, and Russia. (2019-11-14)
Spot the difference: Two identical-looking bird species with very different genes
While reports of species going extinct are sadly becoming common, an international team of scientists has identified a new species of bird living on the Southern coast of China, that diverged from their Northern relatives around half a million years ago. (2019-11-13)
Genetics of species-specific birdsong revealed
Researchers have discovered the genetic mechanism that explains how birds sing different songs depending on their species. (2019-11-13)
Cats of the sea offer insights into territorial behavior of wild fishes
Researchers carrying out regular monitoring of a Marine Protected Area off the UK coastline noticed species of wrasse demonstrating almost cat-like behaviour as they chased lasers shone onto the seabed. (2019-11-12)
Larger than life: Augmented ants
The first app of its kind allows users to interact with biodiversity research through augmented reality. (2019-11-12)
Ant expert discovers newly emergent species in his backyard
Jack Longino is a global ant expert and has traveled the world documenting and discovering ant species. (2019-11-12)
First adult molars are 'living fossils' that hold a health record dating back to the womb
Researchers at McMaster University have found that a person's first permanent molars carry a life-long record of health information dating back to the womb, storing vital information that can connect maternal health to a child's health, even hundreds of years later. (2019-11-11)
New findings on nitrous oxide emissions from northern trees surprised scientists
A recently published study, completed by researchers from the University of Helsinki together with Dr Katerina Machacova, a visiting scholar, demonstrates that boreal forests of the Northern Hemisphere are sources of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). (2019-11-11)
Found: Miniature fanged 'deer' rediscovered tiptoeing through Vietnam's coastal forests
Global Wildlife Conservation and partners Southern Institute of Ecology and Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research have rediscovered a species lost to science since 1990 called a silver-backed chevrotain -- a deer-like species that is the size of a rabbit, has a silver sheen, and has been hanging on in a region of Vietnam ravaged by poaching by snares. (2019-11-11)
Evolutionary diversity is associated with Amazon forest productivity
An international team of researchers have revealed for the first time that Amazon forests with the greatest evolutionary diversity are the most productive. (2019-11-11)
Allergy shots may be an effective treatment for pediatric pollen food allergy syndrome
A new study being presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting in Houston shows allergy shots (subcutaneous immunotherapy) can be effective in reducing PFAS symptoms for pediatric patients. (2019-11-08)
Fossil suggests apes, old world monkeys moved in opposite directions from shared ancestor
In terms of their body plan, Old World monkeys -- a group that includes primates like baboons and macaques -- are generally considered more similar to ancestral species than apes are. (2019-11-08)
Millions of seabirds rely on discarded fish
Millions of scavenging seabirds survive on fish discarded by North Sea fishing vessels, new research shows. (2019-11-07)
Extinct species rediscovered in Winterhoek mountains, South Africa, after 200 years
One of the first recorded species to have been lost to forestry and agriculture in the Western Cape in the 1800s, a type of fountain bush from the pea family that used to grow next to mountain streams in the Tulbagh region, have been rediscovered. (2019-11-06)
Liver-chip predicts the toxicity of drug candidates across species
Researchers have created a 'Liver-Chip' using Organs-on-Chips technology that can predict and characterize the liver toxicity of various drug candidates and compounds in rats, dogs, and humans. (2019-11-06)
Huge gaps in research on microplastics in North America, PSU study finds
Amid increasing concern about the effects of plastic pollution on marine ecosystems, a new study led by Portland State University found that North America is lagging behind other continents when it comes to understanding the potential risks that microplastics and associated pollutants pose to both fisheries and the humans that consume the seafood (2019-11-06)
Scientists studied the reasons for plant extinction in different world regions
A team of Russian researchers from Tyumen State University together with foreign colleagues studied the cases of plant extinction in world biodiversity hotspots and coldspots. (2019-11-05)
NRRI scientist sheds light on complexity of biodiversity loss
University of Minnesota Duluth Natural Resources Research Institute limnologist Chris Filstrup is the lead author on a paper published in the journal Ecology Letters this month, that suggests that species richness -- the number of different species in a given ecological community -- is not the only, nor necessarily the best, way to measure biodiversity impacts on ecosystems. (2019-11-05)
To save biodiversity, scientists suggest 'mega-conservation'
While the conservation of charismatic creatures like pandas, elephants and snow leopards are important in their own right, there may be no better ecological bang-for-our-buck than a sound, science-based effort to save widespread keystone systems. (2019-11-05)
Best of frenemies: Unexpected role of social networks in ecology
Social networking, even between competing species, plays a much bigger role in ecology than anyone previously thought, according to three biologists at UC Davis. (2019-11-01)
Zoo animal research skewed towards 'popular' species
Research on zoo animals focuses more on 'familiar' species like gorillas and chimpanzees than less well known ones like the waxy monkey frog, scientists say. (2019-10-31)
Bound by blood
After studying vampire bat relationships in captivity, researchers at the Smithsonian in Panama released the bats into the wild colony where they originally came from. (2019-10-31)
DNA exchange among species is major contributor to diversity in Heliconius butterflies
Exchange of genetic material among species played a major role in the wide diversity of Heliconius butterflies, according to a new study, results of which inform a centuries-long debate about the value of hybridization to species evolution. (2019-10-31)
Fishery in Lake Shinji, Japan, collapsed 1 year after neonicotinoid use
Neonicotinoid pesticide use may have caused the abrupt collapse of two commercial fisheries on Lake Shinji, Japan, in 1993, according to a new study. (2019-10-31)
1,100 plants examined in massive, 9-year genomic diversity study
A new study published in Nature traces the genetic histories of the last billion years of plant life on Earth. (2019-10-31)
Preserved pollen tells the history of floodplains
Fossil pollen can help reconstruct the past and predict the future. (2019-10-30)
Detection dogs and DNA on the trail of endangered lizards
Detection dogs trained to sniff out the scat of an endangered lizard in California's San Joaquin Valley, combined with genetic species identification, could represent a new noninvasive sampling technique for lizard conservation worldwide. (2019-10-30)
First South American insect that emits blue light is discovered
Larvae of a fungus gnat found in Iporanga, São Paulo State, Brazil, have bioluminescent properties previously observed only in species native to North America, New Zealand and Asia. (2019-10-30)
Facebook and Instagram gave away the presence of the 'Japan pig' seahorse in Taiwan
Having turned to local underwater photographers and scuba divers via social media, a research team from Taiwan not only reported a total of five pygmy seahorses, including the elusive, yet mesmerising 15-millimetre 'Japan pig', which was so far only known from the 'Land of the Rising Sun', but also confirmed Taiwan as one of the world's hotspots when it comes to these curious tiny marine inhabitants. (2019-10-29)
Leipzig primate researchers initiate global collaboration
In order to investigate evolutionary questions, scientists require the largest and most versatile samples possible. (2019-10-29)
IKBFU researchers have discovered another natural antioxidant -- alder bark
An alder bark may become a great source of anti-aging and anti-disease natural antioxidants. (2019-10-25)
Fire-spawned forest fungi hide out in other organisms, study finds
When a wildfire obliterates a forest, the first life to rise from the ashes is usually a fungus - one of several species that cannot complete its life cycle in the absence of fire. (2019-10-25)
Scientists identify British butterflies most threatened by climate change
Many British butterflies and moths have been responding to warmer temperatures by emerging earlier in the year and for the first time scientists have identified why this is creating winners and losers among species. (2019-10-24)
Massive fangs and a death crush: How a 370 million year old tetrapod hunted and killed
The habits of a needle-toothed tetrapod which lived more than 370 million years ago have filled in a piece of the evolutionary puzzle after an international team of palaeontologists pieced together fossilised skeletons and found unusual characteristics such as a crocodile-like skull with high positioned eyes would have been used to 'keep an eye' on prey before it used its slender needle-like teeth and elastic jaw to snatch its kill and crush it to death. (2019-10-24)
New Colorado fossil record documents life's rebound after Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction
Nearly 66 million years ago, the reign of dinosaurs ended and the ascendency of mammals on Earth began. (2019-10-24)
Study provides framework for 1 billion years of green plant evolution
Gene sequences for more than 1,100 plant species have been released by an international consortium of nearly 200 plant scientists, the culmination of a nine-year research project. (2019-10-23)
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