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Current Unemployment News and Events

Current Unemployment News and Events, Unemployment News Articles.
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New study reveals surprising gender disparity in work-life balance
Work-life balance and its association with life satisfaction have been garnering a lot of interest. (2019-07-17)
Parents who help unemployed adult children curb behavior to offset costs
Parents who financially help their unemployed adult children offset such costs by adjusting their behavior, particularly by spending less money on food, working more and reducing retirement savings, according to a new RAND Corporation study. (2019-07-09)
Study: Poor women are more hopeful than poor men
The researchers concluded that even when men are poor and unemployed, their recognition and role is tied to work, money, and markets. (2019-07-08)
The dynamics of workplace sexual harassment in the US
A new Gender, Work & Organization analysis of US data from 1997-2016 provides new insights into workplace sexual harassment. (2019-06-19)
Record-low fertility rates linked to decline in stable manufacturing jobs
New research by University of Wisconsin-Madison sociologist Nathan Seltzer identifies a link between the long-term decline in manufacturing jobs -- accelerated during the Great Recession -- and reduced fertility rates. (2019-06-18)
One day of employment a week is all we need for mental health benefits -- study
Latest research finds up to eight hours of paid work a week significantly boosts mental health and life satisfaction. (2019-06-18)
Economic downturns may affect children's mental health
Research linking economic conditions and health often does not consider children's mental health problems. (2019-06-05)
Skilled health workforce in India does not meet WHO recommended threshold
The skilled health workforce in India does not meet the minimum threshold of 22.8 skilled workers per 10,000 population recommended by the World Health Organization, shows research published today in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-05-27)
Negative economic messaging impacting on suicide rates, says new research
Relentless negative reporting on economic downturns is impacting on people's emotions and contributing to the suicide rate, according to new research. (2019-05-08)
School bullying increases chances of mental health issues and unemployment in later life
Victims of bullying in secondary school have dramatically increased chances of mental health problems and unemployment in later life. (2019-04-17)
Mental health disorders rife in post-conflict areas
A new study has found that 58 percent of people displaced following the civil war in Sri Lanka have suffered mental health problems. (2019-04-01)
Long-term unemployment linked to increase in neonatal abstinence syndrome
Babies born after being exposed to opioids before birth are more likely to be delivered in regions of the US with high rates of long-term unemployment and lower levels of mental health services, according to a study from researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the RAND Corporation. (2019-01-29)
Association between economic factors, clinician supply and rate of newborns exposed to opioids during pregnancy
Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), which are symptoms that primarily occur in newborns exposed to opioids during pregnancy, has increased over the last two decades  but there is limited information on its association with economic conditions or clinician supply. (2019-01-29)
High rates of opioid prescriptions may be linked to poor labor force participation
Prescription opioids may be negatively affecting labor force participation and unemployment nationwide, according to findings in a new study co-authored by economists at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and published in The Journal of Human Resources. (2019-01-28)
Do economic conditions affect pregnancy outcomes?
Economic downturn during early pregnancy was linked with modest increases in preterm birth in a Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology analysis. (2019-01-24)
Cardiac events, stroke lead to loss of work, reduced income in survivors of working age
People who have experienced a heart attack (myocardial infarction), stroke or cardiac arrest are significantly less likely to be working than healthy people, and if they are working, on average have lower incomes, found a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-01-07)
UMN researchers describe need for health systems to improve care of gender non-binary patients
A perspective piece authored by UMN Medical School researchers and published in the New England Journal of Medicine uncovers significant healthcare disparities for individuals who identify as neither male nor female or may not identify as having a gender. (2019-01-07)
Neighborhood affects the healthiness of dietary choices
A new study shows that living or moving to a neighborhood with a higher socioeconomic status is clearly associated with better adherence to dietary recommendations. (2018-12-11)
In times of low unemployment, nursing home quality suffers
The low unemployment rate in the US -- which fell to a 49-year low in September and October -- is good news to many people, but perhaps not to residents of nursing homes. (2018-12-07)
Research examines causes of complications during pregnancy and delivery in adolescents
Pregnancy in adolescence has been linked with increased risks of mortality and life-threatening complications in young mothers and their newborn babies. (2018-12-05)
Postal code area data can help in the planning of cost-effective health care services
When assessing the effects of socioeconomic status (SES) on health inequalities or outcomes of care, it is worthwhile to use small-area-based open data instead of individual SES information, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. (2018-11-26)
Do local employment conditions affect women's pregnancy intentions?
Economic conditions can shape the decisions that adults make about their families, such as whether and when to have children. (2018-11-21)
Post-Soviet Union happiness lag between east and west Europe explained
The upheaval caused by the collapse of the Soviet Union that left millions of workers unemployed for long periods of time could be the reason for the sizeable 'transition happiness gap' that existed for many years between east and western nations in Europe, according to new research. (2018-11-19)
Half as many US children die from firearm injuries where gun laws are strictest
New research shows dramatic differences in the number of children hospitalized and killed each year in the US from firearm-related injuries based on their states' gun legislation, even after adjusting for poverty, unemployment, and education rates. (2018-11-02)
Europeans receptive to new welfare policy ideas
A new report explains European attitudes towards the welfare state, as measured in Round 8 (2016/17) of the European Social Survey. (2018-09-26)
When refugees are barred from working, long-term integration suffers
Many European countries prevent asylum seekers from working for a certain waiting period after arrival. (2018-09-19)
Social class determines how the unemployed talk about food insecurity
'Cherry Blossom,' a 39-year-old woman worked as a hotel breakfast bar hostess around the start of the 'Great Recession.' She lost her job, and three years later she was being interviewed to assess her struggles with her unemployment. (2018-09-13)
California's large minority population drives state's relatively low death rate
High poverty rates, low education and lack of insurance are all social determinants that are expected to lead to high mortality rates and negative health outcomes. (2018-09-06)
Study examines relationship between social disparities and benign prostatic hyperplasia
In an Andrologia study of 100,000 men in Korea, social disparities -- such as low education level and low household income, current or previous use of medical aid health insurance, blue-collar employment or unemployment, divorce, and low social capital of communities -- were all linked with a higher prevalence of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a condition that is characterized by an enlarged prostate due to aging, lower urinary tract blockage, and other factors. (2018-08-22)
More than 40 percent of women with asthma may develop COPD, but risk may be reduced
More than four in 10 women with asthma may go on to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study conducted in Ontario, Canada, and published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. (2018-08-10)
Use of VA services impacted by external economic, policy changes
A new study has found that use of VA services is affected by economic and policy changes outside the VA, such as Medicaid eligibility, private employer insurance coverage, unemployment and (non-VA) physician availability. (2018-07-31)
Study finds Medicaid expansion boosts employment
A study from the University of Kansas found individuals with disabilities were more likely to be employed in states that expanded Medicaid than their peers in non-expansion states, reducing the need to live in poverty to qualify for Medicaid coverage. (2018-07-19)
BU: Almost half of US adults who drink, drink too much, and continue to do so
A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers has found that about 40 percent of adults in the United States who drink alcohol do so in amounts that risk health consequences, and identifies a range of factors associated with starting or stopping drinking too much. (2018-07-17)
Male couples report as much domestic violence as straight couples
Nearly half of all men in a new study about intimate partner violence in male couples report being victims of abuse. (2018-07-10)
Age and education affect job changes, study finds
New research reveals that people are more likely to change jobs when they are younger and well educated, though not necessarily because they are more open to a new experience. (2018-07-05)
Asylum seekers positively affect host countries' economy, though on slower timescale
Asylum seekers fleeing to Western European countries to escape war-ridden areas positively affect a host countries' economy, according to a new report that analyzes 30 years' worth of economic and migration data. (2018-06-20)
No, asylum seekers are not a 'burden' for European economies
Does the arrival of asylum seekers lead to a deterioration in the economic performance and public finances of the European countries that host them? (2018-06-20)
Internet search data shows link between anti-Muslim and pro-ISIS searches in the US
In ethnically alike communities where poverty levels run high, anti-Muslim internet searches are strongly associated with pro-ISIS searches, according to a new analysis. (2018-06-06)
Working or protesting
The higher the unemployment rates in Western European countries, the more likely it is that socio-political destabilization will occur. (2018-05-16)
Study finds better measures than a person's occupation to predict long-term earnings
In a new study, researchers found that a person's cross-sectional annual earnings taken at one point in time have greater predictive power of his or her 20-year long-term earnings, ahead of occupation-based classifications. (2018-05-07)
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