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Current Vaccination News and Events

Current Vaccination News and Events, Vaccination News Articles.
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Candidate Ebola vaccine still effective when highly diluted, macaque study finds
A single dose of a highly diluted VSV-Ebola virus (EBOV) vaccine -- approximately one-millionth of what is in the vaccine being used to help control the ongoing Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo -- remains fully protective against disease in experimentally infected monkeys, according to NIH scientists. (2019-10-18)
New effective vaccines for Lyme disease are coming
There is no effective vaccine currently available to prevent Lyme disease in humans. (2019-10-17)
Ebola antibodies at work
Scientists in Israel and Germany show, on the molecular level, how an experimental vaccine offers long-term protection against the disease. (2019-10-10)
Researchers decode the immune response to Ebola vaccine
The vaccine rVSV-EBOV is currently used in the fight against Ebola virus. (2019-10-10)
Rotavirus infection may turn on type 1 diabetes
Rotavirus infection may play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes, according to a front matter article published Oct. (2019-10-10)
Influenza evolution patterns change with time, complicating vaccine design
Skoltech scientists discovered new patterns in the evolution of the influenza virus. (2019-10-08)
Badger behavior inside the cull zone
A study led by researchers at international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) and Imperial College London has found that culling drives badgers to roam 61% further afield -- helping to explain why the practice, intended to reduce bovine TB transmission, can sometimes exacerbate the problem instead (2019-10-08)
Dog rabies vaccination programs affect human exposure, prophylaxis use
The World Health Organization has made it a goal to eliminate human rabies deaths due to dog bites by the year 2030. (2019-09-26)
Powerful new synthetic vaccines to combat epidemics
A new type of vaccine that can be stored at warmer temperatures, removing the need for refrigeration, has been developed for mosquito-borne virus Chikungunya in a major advance in vaccine technology. (2019-09-25)
Evolution experiment: Specific immune response of beetles adapts to bacteria
The memory of the immune system is able to distinguish a foreign protein with which the organism has already come into contact from another and to react with a corresponding antibody. (2019-09-24)
Study shows the biological clock influences immune response efficiency
According to a recent study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, the biological clock influences immune response efficacy. (2019-09-24)
A single dose of yellow fever vaccine does not offer lasting protection to all children
José Enrique Mejía, Inserm researcher at Unit 1043 Center for Pathophysiology of Toulouse Purpan and Cristina Domingo from the Robert Koch Institute in Berlin have recently shown that around half of children initially protected by the yellow fever vaccination at 9 months of age lose that protection within the next 2 to 5 years, due to disappearance of the neutralizing antibodies. (2019-09-19)
Physicians report high refusal rates for the HPV vaccine and need for improvement
Despite its proven success at preventing cancer, many adolescents are still not getting the HPV vaccine. (2019-09-16)
Most American adults do not know that HPV causes oral, anal, and penile cancers
More than 70% of US adults are unaware that human papillomavirus (HPV) causes anal, penile, and oral cancers, according to an analysis led by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health and published in the current issue of JAMA Pediatrics. (2019-09-16)
Evidence of herd protection against oral HPV infections among unvaccinated US adults
HPV vaccination has been recommended for US females since 2006 and since 2011 for males to prevent anogenital HPV infections and associated cancers. (2019-09-10)
Paid family leave improves vaccination rates in infants
Parents who take paid family leave after the birth of a newborn are more likely to have their child vaccinated on time compared to those who do not, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-09-09)
Disrupting the gut microbiome may affect some immune responses to flu vaccination
The normal human gut microbiome is a flourishing community of microorganisms, some of which can affect the human immune system. (2019-09-06)
Research warns of the far-reaching consequences of measles epidemic and failure to vaccinate
The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) 5th Vaccine Conference will hear that the risks of failing to vaccinate children may extend far beyond one specific vaccine, although currently the most urgent problem to address is the resurgence of measles. (2019-09-05)
Flu vaccination linked with lower risk of death in patients with high blood pressure
Influenza vaccination in patients with high blood pressure is associated with an 18% reduced risk of death during flu season, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology. (2019-09-01)
Some vaccine doubters may be swayed by proximity to disease outbreak, study finds
An individual's trust in institutions such as the CDC, and how close they live to a recent measles outbreak, may affect their attitudes on measles vaccination, according to a study published Aug. (2019-08-28)
New sequencing study provides insight into HIV vaccine protection
Scientists led by the US Military HIV Research Program (MHRP) identified a transcriptional signature in B cells associated with protection from SIV or HIV infection in five independent trials of HIV-1 vaccine candidates. (2019-08-28)
Shingles vaccination of older adults cost-effective in Canada
Vaccinating older adults against shingles in Canada is likely cost-effective, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), and the Shingrix vaccine appears to provide better protection than the Zostavax vaccine. (2019-08-26)
Texas cities increasingly susceptible to large measles outbreaks
The growing number of children arriving at Texas schools unvaccinated makes the state increasingly vulnerable to measles outbreaks in cities large and small, according to a computer simulation created by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. (2019-08-21)
Religion associated with HPV vaccination rate for college women
A survey of female college students finds 25% had not been vaccinated for HPV and religion may be a contributing factor. (2019-08-19)
Should doctors accept unvaccinated children as patients?
Four in 10 parents say they are very or somewhat likely to move their child to a different provider if their doctor sees families who refuse all childhood vaccines, according to a new national poll. (2019-08-19)
Study predicts modest impact from additional dose of rotavirus vaccine
Giving children an additional dose of rotavirus vaccine when they are nine months old would provide only a modest improvement in the vaccine's effectiveness in low-income countries, according to a new study led by the Yale School of Public Health and the Institute of Infection and Global Health at the University of Liverpool. (2019-08-14)
RTS,S vaccine could favor the acquisition of natural immunity against malaria
The RTS,S malaria vaccine could enhance the production of protective antibodies upon subsequent parasite infection, according to a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by 'la Caixa.' The results, published in BMC Medicine, identify the antigens (or protein fragments) that could be included in future, more effective multivalent vaccines. (2019-08-13)
Vaccinations not a risk factor for multiple sclerosis
Data from over 12,000 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients formed the basis of a study by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) which investigated the population's vaccination behavior in relation to MS. (2019-07-31)
One dose of HPV vaccine may be enough, Australian research finds
One dose of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has comparable effectiveness to 2 or 3 doses for preventing cervical pre-cancer, according to a new study. (2019-07-24)
What makes some people more receptive to the idea of being vaccinated against infectious disease?
Fear, trust, and the likelihood of exposure are three leading factors that influence whether people are willing to be vaccinated against a virulent disease, according to a new study in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier. (2019-07-18)
New tuberculosis tests pave way for cow vaccination programs
Skin tests that can distinguish between cattle that are infected with tuberculosis (TB) and those that have been vaccinated against the disease have been created by an international team of scientists. (2019-07-17)
Singapore scientists uncover mechanism behind development of viral infections
A team of researchers from the SingHealth Duke-NUS Academic Medicine Centre's Viral Research and Experimental Medicine Centre (ViREMiCS) found that immune cells undergoing stress and an altered metabolism are the reasons why some individuals become sick from viral infections while others do not, when exposed to the same virus. (2019-07-16)
Political support, strong public health systems key to eliminating measles outbreaks worldwide
Strong political support and strong public health systems are necessary to combat measles outbreaks, which are growing in frequency around the world, argue public health experts in a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-07-15)
Flu fact sheet for parents increases vaccination rate in children
Parents given a handout with flu facts at their pediatrician's office were significantly more likely to get their kids vaccinated before the end of flu season, Columbia pediatricians have found. (2019-07-10)
Top global public health scientists launch new challenge to anti-vaxxers
Search engines and social media organizations must do more to prevent the spread of inaccurate information on childhood vaccination, and governments must better support mandatory immunization programs, says an international group of leading public health scientists in a statement published in the Journal of Health Communication. (2019-07-02)
Using facts to promote cancer prevention on social media is more effective than anecdotes
Clear information from trusted organizations has greater reach on social media than personal accounts. (2019-07-01)
The Lancet: HPV vaccination programmes have substantial impact in reducing HPV infections and precancerous cervical lesions
The new study is the first to show pooled estimates of population-level impact of HPV vaccination on CIN2+ from several countries, the benefit of vaccinating more than one age group, along with substantial herd effects in countries achieving high vaccination coverage. (2019-06-26)
Vaccination programs substantially reduce HPV infections and precancerous cervical lesions
Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination programs have substantially reduced the number of infections and precancerous cervical lesions caused by the virus, according to a study published today in The Lancet by researchers from Université Laval and the CHU de Québec-Université Laval Research Centre. (2019-06-26)
45% of American adults doubt vaccine safety, according to survey
The survey also asked Americans to choose a statement that best represented their feelings about vaccine safety and efficacy. (2019-06-24)
Pathogen engineered to self-destruct underlies cancer vaccine platform
A team of investigators has developed a cancer vaccine technology using live, attenuated pathogens as vectors. (2019-06-24)
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