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Current Vaccination News and Events

Current Vaccination News and Events, Vaccination News Articles.
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Mandatory country-wide BCG vaccination found to correlate with slower growth rates of COVID-19 cases
Scientists have found that countries with mandatory Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination until at least the year 2000 tended to exhibit slower infection and death rates during the first 30 days of the outbreak (2020-07-31)
Iron deficiency during infancy reduces vaccine efficacy
About 40 percent of children around the globe suffer from anaemia because they do not consume enough iron. (2020-07-28)
Flu, pneumonia vaccinations tied to lower risk of Alzheimer's dementia
Flu (influenza) and pneumonia vaccinations are associated with reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to new research reported at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference® (AAIC®) 2020. (2020-07-27)
Flu vaccine may reduce risk of Alzheimer's disease, new study shows
People who received at least one flu vaccination were 17% less likely to get Alzheimer's disease over the course of a lifetime, according to researchers at UTHealth. (2020-07-27)
Flu vaccine could protect against serious heart and stroke complications
The rate of seasonal flu vaccinations among people over age 50 and nursing home residents is extremely low, and those who do get the flu vaccine can significantly lower their risk of heart attack, TIA (transient ischemic attack), death and cardiac arrest. (2020-07-27)
UCalgary researchers unlock new insights that could help with vaccine development
Researchers at the University of Calgary have unlocked new insights that may help with vaccine development for infectious diseases such as COVID-19, malaria, and tuberculosis. (2020-07-27)
Parents of 1 in 2 unvaccinated US adolescents have no intention to initiate HPV vaccine
Study results documenting parental hesitancy to begin and complete their child's HPV vaccine series were published in The Lancet Public Health by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (2020-07-21)
The Lancet: Chinese phase 2 trial finds vaccine is safe and induces an immune response
Chinese phase 2 trial finds vaccine is safe and induces an immune response. (2020-07-20)
Scientists trace and identify origin of smallpox vaccine strains used in Civil War
Scientists and historians working at McMaster University, the Mütter Museum and the University of Sydney have pieced together the genomes of old viruses that were used as vaccination strains during and after the American Civil War ultimately leading to the eradication of smallpox. (2020-07-19)
The Lancet Global Health: Benefits of routine childhood vaccines far outweigh risks of additional COVID-19 transmission in Africa, modelling study suggests
The health benefits of maintaining routine childhood vaccination programmes in Africa during the COVID-19 pandemic far outweigh the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission that might be associated with clinic visits, according to a modelling study published in The Lancet Global Health journal. (2020-07-17)
Vaccine additives can enhance immune flexibility -- Implications for flu and SARS-CoV-2
A vaccine additive known as an adjuvant can enhance responses to a vaccine containing the exotic avian flu virus H5N1, so that both rookie and veteran elements of the immune response are strengthened, according to results from an Emory Vaccine Center study. (2020-07-16)
Aging-associated inflammation may worsen COVID-19 outcomes in older individuals
The increased severity and mortality of SARS-CoV-2 infections in older individuals may be related to inflammageing -- an age-associated phenomenon of increased general inflammation. (2020-07-16)
Studying nearly 300 recently identified antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 reveals a common theme
An analysis of nearly 300 recently identified human SARS-CoV-2 antibodies uncovered a gene frequently used in antibodies that most effectively target the virus. (2020-07-13)
Biomedical Sciences researchers discover first-in-class broad-inhibitor of paramyxovirus polymerases
A new antiviral drug that is effective against a broad range of human pathogens in the paramyxovirus family, such as the human parainfluenzaviruses and measles virus, has been discovered by researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2020-07-13)
Neonatal exposure to antigens of commensal bacteria promotes broader immune repertoire
Researchers have added fresh evidence that early exposure to vaccine-, bacterial- or microbiota-derived antigens has a dramatic effect on the diversity of antibodies an adult mammal will have to fight future infections by pathogens. (2020-07-09)
American Cancer Society updates guideline for HPV vaccination
The American Cancer Society has updated its guideline for HPV vaccination, adapting a 2019 update from the Federal Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. (2020-07-08)
Age-related impairments reversed in animal model
Frailty and immune decline are two main features of old age. (2020-07-06)
Grassroots dog vaccinations can help stop rabies, but not alone
While scientists are trying to find a vaccine for COVID-19, the rabies virus continues to kill 59,000 people every year. (2020-07-02)
Study: Fever-associated seizures after vaccination do not affect development, behavior
Now a new study has found there is no difference in developmental and behavioral outcomes for children who have febrile seizures after vaccination, children who have febrile seizures not associated with vaccination and children who have never had a seizure. (2020-07-01)
Common childhood vaccine might prevent severe complications of COVID-19
A paper published by LSU Health New Orleans and Tulane University School of Medicine researchers suggests that live attenuated vaccines such as MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) may prevent the severe lung inflammation and sepsis associated with COVID-19 infection. (2020-06-26)
Early childhood vaccinations might protect children from COVID-19
A group of Lithuanian and Kurdish scientists have raised a hypothesis that the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine could protect children from COVID-19. (2020-06-25)
Early clinical trial supports tumor cell-based vaccine for mantle cell lymphoma
A phase I/II clinical trial by researchers at Stanford University suggests that vaccines prepared from a patient's own tumor cells may prevent the incurable blood cancer mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) from returning after treatment. (2020-06-19)
Study finds significant parental hesitancy about routine childhood and influenza vaccines
A national study measuring parental attitudes toward vaccinations found 6.1% were hesitant about routine childhood immunizations while nearly 26% were hesitant about the influenza vaccine. (2020-06-15)
Tuberculosis vaccine strengthens immune system
A tuberculosis vaccine developed 100 years ago also makes vaccinated persons less susceptible to other infections. (2020-06-15)
Multilevel interventions improve HPV vaccination rates of series initiation and completion
New research from Boston Medical Center shows that providing education and training to pediatric and family medicine providers about the importance of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, in tandem with healthcare systems changes including starting an HPV vaccination series before the age of 11, improves the overall rate of HPV vaccinations among adolescent patients. (2020-06-15)
Flu vaccine coverage linked to reduced antibiotic prescribing
Researchers at CDDEP, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Maryland School of Medicine assessed the impact of influenza vaccination coverage on state-level antibiotic prescribing rates in the United States between 2010 and 2017. (2020-06-10)
Immune cell discovery could improve the fight against hepatitis B
For the first time, researchers at The Westmead Institute for Medical Research (WIMR) have identified and described a new and unique subset of human cells that are involved in the immune response against hepatitis B (HBV) infection. (2020-06-09)
Computer modelling predicts where vaccines are needed most
Researchers have developed a model that can estimate regional disease burden and the impact of vaccination, even in the absence of robust surveillance data, a study in eLife reveals. (2020-06-09)
Wording of vaccination messages influences behavior
An experiment by Washington State University researchers revealed that relatively small differences in messages influenced people's attitudes about the human papillomavirus or HPV vaccine, which has been shown to help prevent cancer. (2020-06-04)
HPV vaccines that work in US women may miss the target in women from other countries
Most cervical cancers are caused by persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV). (2020-06-04)
When COVID-19 meets flu season
As if the COVID-19 pandemic isn't scary enough, the flu season is not far away. (2020-05-29)
Low vaccination rates and 'measles parties' fueled 2019 measles outbreak in NYC
An analysis of the 2018-2019 measles outbreak in New York City identifies factors that made the outbreak so severe: delayed vaccination of young children combined with increased contact among this age group, likely through ''measles parties'' designed to purposely infect children. (2020-05-27)
The Lancet: First human trial of COVID-19 vaccine finds it is safe and induces rapid immune response
The Lancet: First human trial of COVID-19 vaccine finds it is safe and induces rapid immune response. (2020-05-22)
Viral infection: Early indicators of vaccine efficacy
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich researchers have shown that a specific class of immune cells in the blood induced by vaccination is an earlier indicator of vaccine efficacy than conventional tests for neutralizing antibodies. (2020-05-15)
New approach to design functional antibodies for precision vaccines
A new approach to de novo protein design dubbed 'TopoBuilder' allows researchers to develop complex antigens that, when used in vaccines, elicit antibody responses that target the weaknesses in some of the most intractable viral pathogens, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). (2020-05-14)
New map reveals distrust in health expertise is winning hearts and minds online
Communities on Facebook that distrust establishment health guidance are more effective than government health agencies and other reliable health groups at reaching and engaging 'undecided' individuals, according to a study published today in the journal Nature. (2020-05-13)
In victory over polio, hope for the battle against COVID-19
Medicine's great triumph over polio holds out hope we can do the same for COVID-19, two researchers say. (2020-05-13)
Lidar technology demonstrates how light levels determine mosquito 'rush hour'
The first study to remotely track wild mosquito populations using laser radar (lidar) technology found that mosquitoes in a southeastern Tanzanian village are most active during morning and evening 'rush hour' periods, suggesting these may be the most effective times to target the insects with sprays designed to prevent the spread of malaria. (2020-05-13)
Malaria vaccine trial samples reveal immune benchmarks for achieving protection
By studying samples from two independent clinical trials of malaria vaccines, Gemma Moncunill and colleagues have linked signatures in the immune system to better vaccine protection from the disease in children and adults. (2020-05-13)
Rotavirus vaccination leads to reduced hospitalizations, fewer infant deaths
Vaccination against rotavirus has led to a significant decrease in hospitalisations and deaths of children due to severe diarrhoea in the Western Pacific region, a new study has found. (2020-05-12)
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