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Current Vaccine News and Events

Current Vaccine News and Events, Vaccine News Articles.
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Immune system can be coaxed into selecting key antibodies to fight HIV
Researchers have cleared a major obstacle in the development of an HIV vaccine, proving in animal models that effective, yet short-lasting antibodies can be coaxed into multiplying as a fighting force against the virus (2019-12-05)
Typhoid vaccine over 81% effective in tackling disease in Nepal
A large field study of typhoid conjugate vaccine (TCV) in Nepal has shown a single dose to be safe and effective in reducing typhoid in children aged 9 months to <16 years in an endemic setting. (2019-12-04)
Virtual reality could help flu vaccination rates
Using a virtual reality simulation to show how flu spreads and its impact on others could be a way to encourage more people to get a flu vaccination, according to a study by researchers at the University of Georgia and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. (2019-12-03)
New vaccine will stop the spread of bovine TB
Scientists at the University of Surrey have developed a novel vaccine and complementary skin test to protect cattle against bovine tuberculosis (bovine TB). (2019-11-27)
UK and China research team take first steps towards a vaccine for pancreatic cancer
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London and Zhengzhou University have developed a personalised vaccine system that could ultimately delay the onset of pancreatic cancer. (2019-11-26)
Building a better flu shot
Getting the flu shot can reduce the chances of infection. (2019-11-26)
Simulating amino acid starvation may improve dengue vaccines
In a new paper in Science Signaling, researchers at the University of Hyderabad in India and the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine show that a plant-based compound called halofuginone improves the immune response to a potential vaccine against dengue virus. (2019-11-26)
New Cochrane Review assesses different HPV vaccines & vaccine schedules in adolescent girls and boys
New evidence published in the Cochrane Library today provides further information on the benefits and harms of different human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines and vaccine schedules in young women and men. (2019-11-22)
Successful study of Swedish vaccine candidate against diarrhea
University of Gothenburg reports first successful results of the oral, inactivated vaccine candidate ETVAX against enterotoxigenic E. coli diarrhea in a placebo-controlled phase I/II study in infants and children from 6 months to 5 years of age in Bangladesh. (2019-11-20)
Creating viral targets can weaken HIV vaccination
Vaccination against HIV/SIV can backfire if the vaccine induces the wrong kind of immune response. (2019-11-20)
Unruly T cells complicate the intended benefits of HIV vaccines
Inducing strong responses from T helper (TH) cells -- long seen as a desirable goal for HIV vaccines -- and using multiple antigens can hamper the effectiveness of vaccine candidates for HIV, according to an analysis of macaque experiments and a multicenter, phase 1 trial. (2019-11-20)
Experimental HIV vaccine successfully elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies to the virus
An experimental HIV vaccine developed by scientists at Scripps Research and the nonprofit vaccine research organization IAVI has reached an important milestone by eliciting antibodies that can neutralize a wide variety of HIV strains. (2019-11-20)
Trying to help parents decide to vaccinate kids against HPV? Consider storytelling
Health campaigns on social media aimed at increasing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination may see greater success, according to Drexel University researchers, if they inject a narrative into information-based posts. (2019-11-19)
Disease outbreaks are increasing; a Drexel study shows that legislators are taking action
Vaccine-preventable disease (VPD) outbreaks are increasing in frequency in the United States, but this trend is also met with an uptick in legislation aimed at increasing childhood vaccination in places where those epidemics occurred, according to findings published today in JAMA Pediatrics from researchers at the Dornsife School of Public Health at Drexel University. (2019-11-18)
Scientists make vampire bats 'glow' to simulate vaccine spread
University of Michigan scientists and their colleagues used glowing fluorescent gel to test the potential effectiveness of vaccines to control rabies and other diseases in wild bats. (2019-11-18)
Vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and state legislative proposals
This study explored how health is associated with legislative activity by examining whether outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases, such as measles, mumps, whooping cough and chickenpox, were associated with the introduction of legislation in states to change vaccine exemption laws. (2019-11-18)
Mild Zika infection in fetuses may cause brain abnormalities in young despite no symptoms
Using a relevant animal model (pigs), University of Saskatchewan researchers have shown that mild Zika virus infection in fetuses can cause abnormal brain development in apparently healthy young animals. (2019-11-15)
Inoculating against the spread of viral misinformation
In the first study of public health-related Facebook advertising, newly published in the journal Vaccine, researchers at the University of Maryland, the George Washington University and Johns Hopkins University show that a small group of anti-vaccine ad buyers has successfully leveraged Facebook to reach targeted audiences and that the social media platform's efforts to improve transparency have actually led to the removal of ads promoting vaccination and communicating scientific findings. (2019-11-14)
Researchers develop a faster, stronger rabies vaccine
Every year, more than 59,000 people around the world die of rabies and there remains no cheap and easy vaccine regimen to prevent the disease in humans. (2019-11-14)
Discovery reveals mechanism that turns herpes virus on and off
New research from Dr. Luis M. Schang and his group at the Baker Institute for Animal Health has identified a new mechanism that plays a role in controlling how the herpes virus alternates between dormant and active stages of infection. (2019-11-14)
Scientists close in on malaria vaccine
Scientists have taken another big step forward towards developing a vaccine that's effective against the most severe forms of malaria. (2019-11-14)
Scientists spearhead 'major step forward' for malaria vaccine
Researchers have narrowed down the malaria proteins and disease-fighting antibodies that could be used to develop a vaccine against the most severe forms of malaria. (2019-11-13)
Vaccine reduces likelihood of severe pneumonia
A new study has found severe pneumonia decreases by 35 per cent in children who receive a vaccine against a pneumonia-causing bacteria. (2019-11-12)
An additional component can triple vaccine efficiency, and scientists explained how
A team of Russian scientists carried out a study on the cell immunity level and found out how an adjuvant called azoximer bromide increases the immunogenicity of the anti-flu vaccine. (2019-11-12)
New vaccine protects from widespread, costly infection, mice study shows
A newly developed experimental vaccine was more than eighty percent effective in protecting mice from succumbing to Staphylococcus aureus infection. (2019-11-11)
Live zoster vaccine safe and effective for people taking TNF inhibitors
According to new research findings presented this week at the 2019 ACR/ARP Annual Meeting, the live zoster virus vaccine is safe for people who are currently receiving tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) biologic therapies for various indications (Abstract # 824). (2019-11-09)
Study vaccine protects monkeys against four types of hemorrhagic fever viruses
Scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health have developed an investigational vaccine that protected cynomolgus macaques against four types of hemorrhagic fever viruses endemic to overlapping regions in Africa. (2019-11-08)
Groundbreaking HIV vaccine design strategy shows promise in proof-of-principle tests
The new vaccine strategy centers on stimulating the immune system to produce broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against HIV. (2019-11-07)
In unvaccinated children, 'immune amnesia' occurs in the wake of measles infection
Two separate investigations into the immune systems of 77 unvaccinated children before and after measles infection have revealed the infection can cripple immunity against viruses and bacteria for the long-term, creating a kind of 'immune amnesia' that leaves individuals more vulnerable to future infections by other pathogens. (2019-10-31)
HVTN study confirms correlates of risk associated with decrease in HIV transmission
A pilot study led by senior authors Georgia Tomaras and Peter Gilbert and first authors Scott Neidich, Youyi Fong and Shuying Li of the NIAID-funded HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) demonstrated that an increase in three antibody-mediated immune responses (antibody-mediated Fc? receptor [Fc?R] recruitment, antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis [ADCP], and anti-Env IgG3) correlated with a decrease in HIV transmission. (2019-10-31)
Advance in search for new Clostridioides difficile vaccine
Scientists have made a breakthrough in the hunt for a new vaccine for killer hospital bug Clostridioides difficile (C. diff). (2019-10-25)
By targeting flu-enabling protein, antibody may protect against wide-ranging strains
A nationwide team of researchers has found an antibody that protects mice against a wide range of potentially lethal influenza viruses, advancing efforts to design of a universal vaccine that could either treat or protect people against all strains of the virus. (2019-10-25)
Detection of oral HPV DNA in teen, young adult females
Researchers tested for HPV DNA in oral rinse samples collected over 10 years from a group of sexually active females (ages 13 to 21) who were planning to or had received the vaccine that targets four types of HPV. (2019-10-25)
Ending HIV will require optimizing treatment and prevention tools, say NIH experts
Optimal implementation of existing HIV prevention and treatment tools and continued development of new interventions are essential to ending the HIV pandemic, National Institutes of Health experts write in a commentary in Clinical Infectious Diseases. (2019-10-24)
Lassa fever: Vaccine set to be trialed
There is currently no vaccine for the Lassa arenavirus, which causes Lassa fever. (2019-10-24)
Flu antibody protects against numerous and wide-ranging strains
A human antibody that protects mice against a wide range of lethal flu viruses could be the key to a universal vaccine and better treatments for severe flu disease, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2019-10-24)
Clues to improve cancer immunotherapy revealed
A new study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2019-10-23)
Journal articles explore fatal consequences of immigrant detention policies, conditions
An analysis and related commentary published in Clinical Infectious Diseases today provide in-depth examination of the deplorable and dangerous conditions in US immigrant detention centers where seven children have died in the last 10 months. (2019-10-23)
HPV immunization program cuts pre-cancer rates by more than half
A school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization program in British Columbia, Canada, is dramatically reducing rates of cervical pre-cancer in B.C. women, according to a new study. (2019-10-21)
Scientists pioneer new way of finding cancer-causing germs
University of East Anglia scientists are pioneering a new way of finding cancer-causing germs. (2019-10-21)
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