Current Vaccines News and Events

Current Vaccines News and Events, Vaccines News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
KU Leuven vaccine candidate protects against Covid-19 and yellow fever
KU Leuven researchers published results of their vaccine candidate, a vector vaccine based on the yellow fever vaccine. The paper shows that the vaccine protects hamsters from infection with the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus after a single dose. It is also effective in monkeys. (2020-12-01)

Increasing HPV vaccine uptake in adolescents
More than 90 percent of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers could be prevented by widespread uptake of the HPV vaccine. Yet, vaccine use in the United States falls short of public health goals. (2020-12-01)

COVID-19 studies should also focus on mucosal immunity, researchers argue
More COVID-19 studies should be devoted to how immunity emerges to SARS-CoV-2 in the mucous membranes of the nose and mouth, a new paper argues. (2020-11-30)

SARS-CoV-2 mutations do not appear to increase transmissibility
None of the mutations currently documented in the SARS-CoV-2 virus appear to increase its transmissibility in humans, according to a study led by UCL researchers, published in Nature Communications. (2020-11-25)

Fiji's vaccine program reduces childhood death and illness: study
Fiji's national vaccine program against pneumonia, a serious lung condition, and rotavirus, a common disease which causes severe diarrhoea and vomiting, has reduced illness and death, new research shows. (2020-11-25)

Most adults over 50 say they'll get vaccinated against COVID-19, but many want to wait
A new poll of older adults - one of the highest-priority groups for COVID-19 vaccination - suggests an uphill climb lies ahead to reach the goal of widespread protection. In all, 58% of adults aged 50 to 80 say they are somewhat or very likely to get vaccinated to prevent COVID-19, but many say they want to wait until others are vaccinated first. (2020-11-24)

Proving viability of injection-free microneedle for single-administration of vaccines
A single-use, self-administered microneedle technology developed by UConn faculty to provide immunization against infectious diseases has recently been validated by preclinical research trials. Recently published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, the development and preclinical testing of the microneedle patches was reported by UConn researchers in the lab of Thanh Nguyen, assistant professor in the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering. (2020-11-23)

Big cats and small dogs: solving the mystery of canine distemper in wild tigers
Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes a serious disease in domestic dogs, and also infects other carnivores, including threatened species like the Amur tiger. It is often assumed that domestic dogs are the primary source of CDV, but in a new Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine study found that other local wildlife was the primary source of CDV transmission to tigers instead. (2020-11-23)

Experts issue recommendations for equitable distribution of COVID-19 vaccine
A group of vaccine experts led by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has published recommendations to ensure equitable distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine when it becomes available. The framework, published today in Heath Affairs, focuses on five principles the authors believe would strengthen the current immunization delivery system to ensure equitable access to everyone for whom vaccination is recommended. (2020-11-19)

COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness to be affected heavily by infrastructure, public attitudes
The success of a COVID-19 vaccine will depend not only on its efficacy, but will hinge at least as much on how fast and widely it can be delivered, the severity of the pandemic, and the public's willingness to be immunized, according to a study published in Health Affairs. (2020-11-19)

Many unresolved questions remain regarding T cell immunity to SARS-CoV-2
T cell responses are critical for providing early control and clearance of many viral infections, but there remain many unknowns concerning T cell immunity in COVID-19. Some T cell responses may even have a detrimental impact on the clinical outcome and contribute to long COVID, a phenomenon that affects roughly 10% of COVID-19 patients, causing them to experience an array of symptoms for a month or longer. (2020-11-18)

Potential cholera vaccine target discovered
Investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital analyzed antibodies recovered from humans who survived cholera. Experiments showed that the antibodies block V. cholerae bacteria's motility. (2020-11-17)

Immunological memory after cured Sars-CoV-2 infection
After recovery from SARS-CoV-2 infection, immune cells are formed which remain in the body and could mediate a rapid immune response in case of re-infection. The Freiburg study was published in the online edition of Nature Medicine on November 12, 2020 and gives hope for vaccine development. (2020-11-17)

Comprehensive safety testing of COVID-19 vaccines based on experience with prior vaccines
'The urgent need for COVID-19 vaccines must be balanced with the imperative of ensuring safety and public confidence in vaccines by following the established clinical safety testing protocols throughout vaccine development, including both pre- and post-deployment,' write David M. Knipe and colleagues in this Perspective. (2020-11-17)

Researchers discover how to boost vaccine designed to prevent melanoma recurrence
A vaccine created to prevent the recurrence of the deadly skin cancer melanoma is about twice as effective when patients also receive two components that boost the number and effectiveness of immune system cells called dendritic cells, according to phase 2 clinical trial results published in Nature Cancer in November. (2020-11-16)

Identification of the SARS-CoV-2 virus features causing COVID-19 using primate model
Features of the SARS-CoV-2 virus causing COVID-19, which could be useful for developing vaccines and treatment strategies, were identified using a nonhuman primate model developed at the Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology(KRIBB). (2020-11-15)

Mimicking SARS-CoV-2 nasal infection in monkeys
A new rhesus macaque animal model recapitulates the clinical and pathological manifestations of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) observed in humans by mimicking natural infection via the nasal route, according to a study published November 12 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Longding Liu, Qihan Li, Zhanlong He, and colleagues. As noted by the authors, the new animal model could lead to effective treatments or vaccines for COVID-19, which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). (2020-11-12)

MTU, UMass researchers preserve viral vaccines without refrigeration
Half of vaccines are wasted annually because they aren't kept cold. Michigan Tech and UMass Amherst chemical engineers have discovered a way to stabilize viruses in vaccines with proteins instead of temperature. (2020-11-11)

Recommendations for fair and regulated access to a COVID-19 vaccine
The first COVID-19 vaccines could be authorized as early as the start of 2021. However, in all likelihood, there will not be sufficient vaccine doses in the beginning for all the people willing to undergo vaccination. This is why prioritization will be necessary. In the position paper published today, medical-epidemiological aspects of infection prevention are presented alongside ethical, legal and practical considerations. On this basis, the authors develop a framework for action for the initial prioritization of vaccination measures against COVID-19. (2020-11-09)

$1 million to support manufacturing of COVID-19 treatments, vaccines at uOttawa, Ottawa Hospital
Researchers from the University of Ottawa and The Ottawa Hospital have been awarded $1,050,000 million from the Canada Foundation for Innovation to support facilities for manufacturing innovative treatments and vaccines for COVID-19. (2020-11-09)

Could SARS-CoV-2 evolve resistance to COVID-19 vaccines?
Similar to bacteria evolving resistance to antibiotics, viruses can evolve resistance to vaccines, and the evolution of SARS-CoV-2 could undermine the effectiveness of vaccines that are currently under development, according to a paper published November 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by David Kennedy and Andrew Read from Pennsylvania State University, USA. The authors also offer recommendations to vaccine developers for minimizing the likelihood of this outcome. (2020-11-09)

Safety of HPV vaccines in males
A new analysis published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology shows that HPV vaccines are safe and well tolerated in the male population, and the side effects that may occur after immunization are similar in both sexes. (2020-11-04)

Researchers identify key marker to help speed development of CMV vaccines
A Duke Health-led research team has identified a key marker that will help speed effective vaccine designs for cytomegalovirus (CMV), the most common congenital infection worldwide and a leading cause of infant brain damage. (2020-11-04)

Fighting Zika? Call in the T cells
In a new Science Advances study, Shresta and her colleagues at LJI report that the immune system's T cells have the power to prevent Zika infection in mice. This finding suggests that effective Zika vaccines need to activate T cells to work alongside antibodies. (2020-11-04)

Key populations for early COVID-19 immunization in Canada
Canada's National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) recommends vaccinating key populations, such as people at risk of severe illness or death, those at risk of transmitting the virus and essential workers, during the initial rollout of a COVID-19 vaccine in Canada. The preliminary guidance, developed for the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-11-03)

Seven different 'disease forms' identified in mild COVID-19
In a study a team of MedUni Vienna scientists led by immunologist Winfried F. Pickl and allergologist Rudolf Valenta showed that there are seven ''forms of disease'' in COVID-19 with mild disease course and that the disease leaves behind significant changes in the immune system, even after 10 weeks. These findings could play a significant role in the treatment of patients and in the development of a potent vaccine. (2020-11-02)

ICE detention centers saw sustained outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases, says study
More than a dozen US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention centers experienced large, repeated outbreaks of vaccine-preventable illnesses in the last three years, according to a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco. (2020-10-29)

COVID-19 vaccine nationalism could cost world up to $1.2 trillion: New RAND Europe study
A huge global research effort is taking place to bring a fast-tracked COVID-19 vaccine to the market but there is concern that certain countries may prioritise their own population's access to any vaccines developed. New RAND Europe research shows that if some countries are unable to obtain vaccines owing to vaccine nationalism it could cost the global economy up to $1.2 trillion per year in GDP terms. (2020-10-28)

Turning a coronavirus protein into a nanoparticle could be key for COVID-19 vaccine
One of the proteins on the virus - located on the characteristic COVID spike - has a component called the receptor-binding domain, or RBD, which is its ''Achilles heel.'' That is, he said, antibodies against this part of the virus have the potential to the neutralize the virus. (2020-10-28)

Model could improve design of vaccines, immunotherapies
Researchers have discovered a general property for understanding how immune cell receptors sense and respond to microbial signals, which could lead to more effective vaccines for both existing and novel viruses. (2020-10-27)

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Experts outline key challenges for assessing clinical efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines
Collaboration and standardised approaches for assessing different vaccine efficacy endpoints are key for meaningful comparison of different COVID-19 vaccine candidates to ensure that the most effective vaccines are deployed, say authors of an opinion piece based on a review of evidence, and published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal. (2020-10-27)

New imaging method reveals HIV's sugary shield in unprecedented detail
Scientists from Scripps Research have devised a method for mapping in unprecedented detail the thickets of slippery sugar molecules that help shield HIV from the immune system. Mapping these shields will give researchers a more complete understanding of why antibodies react to some spots on the virus but not others, and may shape the design of new vaccines that target the most vulnerable sites on viruses. (2020-10-23)

How does the immune system develop in the first days of life?
Researchers highlight the anti-inflammatory response taking place after birth and designed to shield the newborn from infection. Early protection is ensured by the innate immunity through the rapid development of the complement pathway during the first week after birth. (2020-10-22)

Vaccine to treat and prevent lung, bowel and pancreatic cancer shows promise in the lab
An experimental vaccine, designed to enlist the body's own immune system to target cancer cells, has shown promise for treating and preventing cancer in mice. The vaccine was created to target a gene called KRAS that is involved in the development of many types of cancer, including lung, bowel and pancreatic cancer. (2020-10-22)

'Foreign disinformation' social media campaigns linked to falling vaccination rates
'Foreign disinformation' social media campaigns are linked to falling vaccination rates, reveals an international time trends analysis, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2020-10-22)

Perspective: Understanding COVID-19 vaccine efficacy
In this Perspective, Marc Lipsitch and Natalie Dean consider what would happen if a COVID-19 vaccine offers little to no protection in high-risk groups, like the elderly and those with comorbidities, yet is able to reduce infection or infectiousness in younger adults. (2020-10-21)

Covid-19 vaccine trials cannot tell us if they will save lives
Vaccines are being hailed as the solution to the covid-19 pandemic, but the vaccine trials currently underway are not designed to tell us if they will save lives, reports Peter Doshi, Associate Editor at The BMJ today. (2020-10-21)

Efficacy, politics influence public trust in COVID-19 vaccine
If an initial COVID-19 vaccine is about as effective as a flu shot, uptake by the American public may fall far short of the 70% level needed to achieve herd immunity, new Cornell research suggests. (2020-10-20)

ACP and Annals of Internal Medicine hold virtual COVID-19 vaccine forum
The American College of Physicians (ACP) and Annals of Internal Medicine hosted a virtual forum on October 16 assembling some of the country's leading health experts to discuss timely, evidence-based information related to what physicians and other health care professionals need to know about a COVID-19 vaccine. During the forum, experts discussed the progress of the science and the challenges related to bringing the vaccine to the public. (2020-10-19)

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Preliminary results find vaccine candidate based on inactivated SARS-CoV-2 virus is safe and induces an immune response in healthy volunteers
A Chinese COVID-19 vaccine candidate based on the inactivated whole SARS-CoV-2 virus (BBIBP-CorV) is safe and elicits an antibody response, findings from a small early-phase randomised clinical trial published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal have found. (2020-10-15)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.