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Current Vertebrate paleontology News and Events

Current Vertebrate paleontology News and Events, Vertebrate paleontology News Articles.
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Strange new species of duck-billed dinosaur identified
The most complete skull of a duck-billed dinosaur from Big Bend National Park, Texas, is revealed in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology as a new genus and species, Aquilarhinus palimentus. (2019-07-15)
Small horned dinosaur from China, a Triceratops relative, walked on two feet
Auroraceratops, a bipedal dinosaur that lived roughly 115 million years ago, has been newly described by an international team of researchers led by paleontologist Peter Dodson of the University of Pennsylvania and former student Eric Morschhauser, now of Indiana University of Pennsylvania. (2019-07-12)
New species of lizard found in stomach of microraptor
A team of paleontologists led by Professor Jingmai O'Connor from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with researchers from the Shandong Tianyu Museum of Nature, have discovered a new specimen of the volant dromaeosaurid Microraptor zhaoianus with the remains of a nearly complete lizard preserved in its stomach. (2019-07-11)
Ancient Saharan seaway shows how Earth's climate and creatures can undergo extreme change
A new paper integrates 20 years of research by a diverse scientific team and describes the ancient Trans-Saharan Seaway of Africa that existed 50 to 100 million years ago in the region of the current Sahara Desert. (2019-07-08)
Discovery reveals prolific ability of Schwann cells to generate myelin
Scientists have discovered that a special type of cell is much more prolific in generating a protective sheath covering nerve fibers than previously believed. (2019-07-05)
Slime travelers
New UC Riverside-led research settles a longstanding debate about whether the most ancient animal communities were deliberately mobile. (2019-06-20)
Dinosaur bones are home to microscopic life
Scientists went looking for preserved collagen, the protein in bone and skin, in dinosaur fossils. (2019-06-18)
Crocs' climate clock: Ancient distribution of Crocs could reveal more about past climates
Underneath their tough exteriors, some crocodilians have a sensitive side that scientists could use to shine light on our ancient climate, according to new findings published in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. (2019-06-18)
What's your poison? Scrupulous scorpions tailor venom to target
Replenishing venom takes time and energy -- so it pays to be stingy with stings. (2019-06-10)
Salmon get a major athletic boost via a single enzyme
A single enzyme anchored to the walls of salmons' blood vessels helps reduce how hard their hearts have to work during exercise by up to 27%. (2019-06-04)
Snout dated: Slow-evolving elephant shark offers new insights into human physiology
Slow-evolving elephant shark reveals hormonal adaptation and offers new insights into human physiology. (2019-06-04)
Exotic pets can become pests with risk of invasion
In a new study, a team of researchers gain further insight into the dynamics of the exotic pet trade and the role it plays in the introduction of invasive vertebrate populations across the globe. (2019-06-03)
Homo sapiens may have had several routes of dispersal across Asia in the Late Pleistocene
Homo sapiens may have had a variety of routes to choose from while dispersing across Asia during the Late Pleistocene Epoch, according to a study released May 29, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Feng Li of the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology in Beijing and colleagues. (2019-05-29)
Humans used northern migration routes to reach eastern Asia
Northern and Central Asia have been neglected in studies of early human migration, with deserts and mountains being considered uncompromising barriers. (2019-05-29)
Thai dinosaur is a cousin of T. rex
Scientists from the University of Bonn and the Sirindhorn Museum in Thailand have identified two new dinosaur species. (2019-05-28)
The neural mechanisms that inhibit slow muscle activity during fast swimming in fish
Using zebrafish larvae, Assistant Professor Yukiko Kimura and Professor Shin-Ichi Higashijima of the National Institute for Basic Biology in Japan have discovered neural mechanisms that suppress slow muscle activity in fish swimming at high speeds. (2019-05-22)
In a first, researchers identify reddish coloring in an ancient fossil
Researchers have for the first time detected chemical traces of red pigment in an ancient fossil -- an exceptionally well-preserved mouse, not unlike today's field mice, that roamed the fields of what is now the German village of Willershausen around 3 million years ago. (2019-05-21)
Museum volunteers discover new species of extinct heron at North Florida fossil site
When the bones of an ancient heron were unearthed at a North Florida fossil site, the find wasn't made by researchers but by two Florida Museum of Natural History volunteers. (2019-05-16)
Molecular basis of brain dysfunction and embryo malformation associated with thalidomide
Scientists at the Tokyo Medical University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology identified the molecule involved in thalidomide-related dysfunctions associated with in utero brain and organ development. (2019-05-15)
First birds: Archaeopteryx gets company
Researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich describe a hitherto unknown bird from the late Jurassic period. (2019-05-14)
Color vision found in fish that live in near darkness
An international team of researchers discovered a previously unknown visual system that may allow color vision in deep, dark waters where animals were presumed to be colorblind. (2019-05-09)
New Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur sheds light on origin of flight in Dinosauria
A new Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur from 163-million-year-old fossil deposits in northeastern China provides new information regarding the incredible richness of evolutionary experimentation that characterized the origin of flight in the Dinosauria. (2019-05-08)
Chewing versus sex in the duck-billed dinosaurs
The duck-billed hadrosaurs walked the Earth over 90-million years ago and were one of the most successful groups of dinosaurs. (2019-05-02)
Middle Pleistocene human skull reveals variation and continuity in early Asian humans
A team of scientists led by LIU Wu and WU Xiujie from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the first ever Middle Pleistocene human skull found in southeastern China, revealing the variation and continuity in early Asian humans. (2019-04-30)
New 3D imaging and visualization technique provides detailed views of muscle architecture
In a new study, scientists in pathology and anatomical sciences in the University of Missouri's School of Medicine have revealed a three-dimensional view of the skeletal muscles responsible for flight in a European starling. (2019-04-30)
Flowering plants, new teeth and no dinosaurs: New study sheds light on the rise of mammals
A new study has identified three factors critical in the rise of mammal communities since they first emerged during the Age of Dinosaurs: the rise of flowering plants; the evolution of tribosphenic molars in mammals; and the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs, which reduced competition between mammals and other vertebrates in terrestrial ecosystems. (2019-04-30)
Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore
Paleontologists at Ohio University have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. (2019-04-18)
Fish that outlived dinosaurs reveals secrets of ancient skull evolution
A new study into one of the world's oldest types of fish, coelacanth, provides fresh insights into the development of the skull and brain of vertebrates and the evolution of lobe-finned fishes and land animals, as published in Nature. (2019-04-17)
Coelacanth reveals new insights into skull evolution
An international team of researchers presents the first observations of the development of the skull and brain in the living coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae. (2019-04-17)
MU neurobiologists annotate critical neuronal proteins in lamprey genome
The lamprey, an eel-like primitive vertebrate, is a popular organism for neurobiology studies because it has a relatively simple nervous system. (2019-04-15)
Ancient 'Texas Serengeti' had elephant-like animals, rhinos, alligators and more
During the Great Depression, Texans were put to work as fossil hunters. (2019-04-11)
Gut microbiota and phytoestrogen-associated infertility in southern white rhinoceros
Researchers from the San Diego Zoo Global Institute for Conservation Research have found the gut microbiota of the captive southern white rhinoceros may partially explain its infertility. (2019-04-09)
The return of Cthulhu -- the small sea critter
Researchers at Yale, Oxford, the University of Leicester, Imperial College London, and University College London have identified a 430-million-year-old fossil as a new species related to living sea cucumbers. (2019-04-09)
Which came first, the lizard or the egg?
In a world first, Sydney biologists have observed a three-toed skink lay eggs and give birth to a live baby from the same pregnancy, opening a useful pathway to study the evolution of pregnancy. (2019-04-02)
Stunning discovery offers glimpse of minutes following 'dinosaur-killer' Chicxulub impact
At a site called Tanis in North Dakota's Hell Creek Formation, a team of paleontologists whose headquarters are at the University of Kansas unearthed a motherlode of exquisitely preserved animal and fish fossils that were killed suddenly in events triggered by the Chicxulub impact. (2019-03-29)
UTA biologist shows new insights into chromosome evolution, venom regulation in snakes
In a new paper, a team of biologists addressed genomic questions by generating and analyzing the first most complete chromosome-level genome for a snake -- the prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis). (2019-03-29)
New gene potentially involved in metastasis identified
Cancers that display a specific combination of sugars, called T-antigen, are more likely to spread through the body and kill a patient. (2019-03-26)
In vivo data show effects of spaceflight microgravity on stem cells and tissue regeneration
A new review of data from 12 spaceflight experiments and simulated microgravity studies has shown that microgravity does not have a negative effect on stem-like cell-dependent tissue regeneration in newts, but in some tissues regeneration is faster and more robust. (2019-03-25)
New Cretaceous fossil sheds light on avian reproduction
A team of scientists led by Alida Bailleul and Jingmai O'Connor from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the first fossil bird ever found with an egg preserved inside its body. (2019-03-20)
Rukwa Rift Basin Project names new Cretaceous mammal from East African Rift System
Ohio University researchers announced a new species of mammal from the Age of Dinosaurs, representing the most complete mammal from the Cretaceous Period of continental Africa, and providing tantalizing insights into the past diversity of mammals on the planet. (2019-03-18)
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