Nav: Home

Current Vision News and Events

Current Vision News and Events, Vision News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Palaeontology: 429-million-year-old eye provides a view of trilobite life
The internal structure of a 429-million-year-old fossilized trilobite eye is almost identical to that of modern bees, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-08-13)
Researchers develop cell injection technique that could help reverse vision loss
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have developed a new method of injecting healthy cells into damaged eyes. (2020-08-13)
Heavy class A drug use linked to heightened risk of sight loss in US military
Heavy use of class A drugs, such as heroin, methamphetamine, or cocaine is linked to a heightened risk of partial or total blindness among US military personnel, finds research published online in the journal BMJ Military Health. (2020-08-13)
Young nearsighted kids benefit from bifocal contact lenses, study shows
Bifocal contact lenses aren't just for aging eyes anymore. In nearsighted kids as young as 7 years old, multifocal contact lenses with a heavy dose of added reading power can dramatically slow further progression of myopia, new research has found. (2020-08-11)
Multifocal contact lenses slow myopia progression in children
Children wearing multifocal contact lenses had slower progression of their myopia, according to results from a clinical trial funded by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health. (2020-08-11)
KIST finds clue to improve artificial vision for patients with retinitis pigmentosa
A Korean research team has reported important findings that could potentially improve the performance of retinal prostheses creating artificial vision for blind individuals. (2020-08-10)
School-based vision screening programs found 1 in 10 kids had vision problems
A school-based vision screening program in kindergarten, shown to be effective at identifying untreated vision problems in 1 in 10 students, could be useful to implement widely in diverse communities, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191085. (2020-07-20)
Older adults who can really smell the roses may face lower likelihood of dementia
Seniors who can identify smells like roses, turpentine, paint-thinner and lemons, and have retained their senses of hearing, vision and touch, may have half the risk of developing dementia as their peers with marked sensory decline. (2020-07-20)
Glaucoma study findings emphasise need for regular eye checks
People with early-stage glaucoma see the contrast of visible objects in a very similar way to people without the condition, a new study has shown. (2020-07-17)
NUS researchers gives robots intelligent sensing abilities to carry out complex tasks
The novel system developed by National University Singapore computer scientists and materials engineers combines an artificial brain system with human-like electronic skin, and vision sensors, to make robots smarter. (2020-07-15)
Vision scientists discover why people literally don't see eye to eye
We humans may not always see eye to eye on politics, religion, sports and other matters of debate. (2020-07-14)
Study finds that special filters in glasses can help the color blind see colors better
A new UC Davis Eye Center study, conducted in collaboration with France's INSERM Stem Cell and Brain Research Institute, found that special patented glasses engineered with technically advanced spectral notch filters enhance color vision for those with the most common types of red-green color vision deficiency ('anomalous trichromacy'). (2020-07-13)
Is what I see, what I imagine? Study finds neural overlap between vision and imagination
In Current Biology, Medical University of South Carolina researchers report the results of a study using artificial intelligence and human brain studies to compare brain areas involved in mental imagery and vision. (2020-07-10)
Hearing and visual impairments linked to elevated dementia risk
Older adults with both hearing and visual impairments--or dual sensory impairment--had a significantly higher risk for dementia in a recent study published in Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring. (2020-07-08)
Researchers uncover a critical early step of the visual process
The key components of electrical connections between light receptors in the eye and the impact of these connections on the early steps of visual signal processing have been identified for the first time, according to research published today in Science Advances by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (2020-07-08)
Exercise can slow or prevent vision loss, study finds
Exercise can slow or prevent the development of macular degeneration and may benefit other common causes of vision loss, such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, new research suggests. (2020-07-01)
A revolutionary new treatment alternative to corneal transplantation
A new approach in ophthalmology that offers a revolutionary alternative to corneal transplantation has just been developed by researchers and clinicians in North America, Europe, and Oceania. (2020-06-30)
Declining eyesight improved by looking at deep red light
Staring at a deep red light for three minutes a day can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a new UCL-led study, the first of its kind in humans. (2020-06-28)
Humans navigate with stereo olfaction
A new study conducted by graduate student WU Yuli and his colleagues at the Institute of Psychology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences indicates that humans have a stereo sense of smell that subconsciously guides navigation. (2020-06-24)
The mystery of visual stability
We move our eyes several times per second. These fast eye movements, called saccades, create large image shifts on the retina -- making our visual system work hard to maintain a stable perceptual world. (2020-06-11)
A vitamin A analog may help treat diabetic retinopathy
Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and a leading cause of blindness among the working-age population. (2020-06-11)
Retinitis pigmentosa research probes role of the enzyme DHDDS in this genetic disease
Researchers who made a knock-in mouse-model of the genetic disorder retinitis pigmentosa 59, or RP59, expected to see retinal degeneration and retinal thinning. (2020-06-11)
HKUST scientists develop world's first spherical artificial eye with 3D retina
An international team led by HKUST scientists has developed the world's first 3D artificial eye with capabilities better than existing bionic eyes and in some cases, even exceed those of the human eyes, bringing vision to humanoid robots and new hope to patients with visual impairment. (2020-06-10)
Restoring vision by gene therapy
Latest scientific findings give hope for people with incurable retinal degeneration. (2020-06-04)
Vision loss influences perception of sound
People with severe vision loss can less accurately judge the distance of nearby sounds, potentially putting them more at risk of injury. (2020-06-03)
Researchers control cattle microbiomes to reduce methane and greenhouse gases
''Now that we know we can influence the microbiome development, we can use this knowledge to modulate microbiome composition to lower the environmental impact of methane from cows by guiding them to our desired outcomes,'' Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Prof Mizrahi says. (2020-06-01)
'Single pixel' vision in fish helps scientists understand how humans can spot tiny details
Recently discovered 'single-pixel vision' in fish could help researchers understand how humans are able to spot tiny details in their environment -- like stars in the sky. (2020-05-29)
Vision: Observing the world during childhood affects the rest of life
Much of what we will be as adults depends on the first years of life, on what we simply observe happening around us and not only on what we are taught explicitly. (2020-05-29)
Sea snakes have been adapting to see underwater for 15 million years
A study led by the University of Plymouth (UK) has for the first time provided evidence of where, when and how frequently species have adapted their ability to see in color. (2020-05-28)
Researchers incorporate computer vision and uncertainty into AI for robotic prosthetics
Researchers have developed new software that can be integrated with existing hardware to enable people using robotic prosthetics or exoskeletons to walk in a safer, more natural manner on different types of terrain. (2020-05-27)
'Time is vision' after a stroke
University of Rochester researchers studied stroke patients who experienced vision loss and found that the patients retained some visual abilities immediately after the stroke but these abilities diminished gradually and eventually disappeared permanently after approximately six months. (2020-05-22)
New paper helps advance myopia management strategies
'Myopia Control 2020: Where are we and where are we heading?' has been published in Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics, the peer-reviewed journal of The College of Optometrists, giving eye care practitioners a comprehensive analysis of evidence-based information needed to help manage myopia. (2020-05-12)
'Data clouds fusion' helps robots work as a team in hazardous situations
A group of researchers and engineers has created a new way for robots to pool data gathered in real time, allowing them to 'think' collectively and navigate their way through difficult, previously unmapped obstacles as a team. (2020-05-11)
Computer vision helps SLAC scientists study lithium ion batteries
New machine learning methods bring insights into how lithium ion batteries degrade, and show it's more complicated than many thought. (2020-05-08)
NEI researchers link age-related DNA modifications to susceptibility to eye disease
National Eye Institute (NEI) researchers profiling epigenomic changes in light-sensing mouse photoreceptors have a clearer picture of how age-related eye diseases may be linked to age-related changes in the regulation of gene expression. (2020-04-21)
New algorithm to help process biological images
Skoltech researchers have presented a new biological image processing method that accurately picks out specific biological objects in complex images. (2020-04-21)
Researchers pinpoint potential new therapeutic target for eye disease
Multi-disciplinary work led by researchers from Trinity College Dublin has pinpointed a potential new therapeutic target for treating retinal degeneration. (2020-04-20)
Neural circuits mapped: Now we understand vision better
Researchers from Aarhus University have discovered the function of a special group of nerve cells which are found in the eye and which sense visual movement. (2020-04-16)
Smartphone videos produce highly realistic 3D face reconstructions
Normally, it takes pricey equipment and expertise to create an accurate 3D reconstruction of someone's face. (2020-04-01)
How well do you know the back of your hand, really?
Many of us are spending a lot of time looking at our hands lately and we think we know them pretty well. (2020-03-24)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Biology Of Sex
Original broadcast date: May 8, 2020. Many of us were taught biological sex is a question of female or male, XX or XY ... but it's far more complicated. This hour, TED speakers explore what determines our sex. Guests on the show include artist Emily Quinn, journalist Molly Webster, neuroscientist Lisa Mosconi, and structural biologist Karissa Sanbonmatsu.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#569 Facing Fear
What do you fear? I mean really fear? Well, ok, maybe right now that's tough. We're living in a new age and definition of fear. But what do we do about it? Eva Holland has faced her fears, including trauma and phobia. She lived to tell the tale and write a book: "Nerve: Adventures in the Science of Fear".
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Wubi Effect
When we think of China today, we think of a technological superpower. From Huweai and 5G to TikTok and viral social media, China is stride for stride with the United States in the world of computing. However, China's technological renaissance almost didn't happen. And for one very basic reason: The Chinese language, with its 70,000 plus characters, couldn't fit on a keyboard.  Today, we tell the story of Professor Wang Yongmin, a hard headed computer programmer who solved this puzzle and laid the foundation for the China we know today. This episode was reported and produced by Simon Adler with reporting assistance from Yang Yang. Special thanks to Martin Howard. You can view his renowned collection of typewriters at: antiquetypewriters.com Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.